2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601792
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Stressors, Inflammation and Preterm Birth in African-American Women
Other Titles:
Depression in Women: Research Regarding Mental Health Stressors and Status [Session]
Author(s):
Giurgescu, Carmen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Carmen Giurgescu, RN, WHNP, carmen.giurgescu@wayne.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: In 2012 in the United States, 11.5% of infants were born prematurely (<37 weeks) and African American women had almost twice the rates of preterm birth compared with non-Hispanic white women. Preterm birth is associated with neonatal mortality and morbidity, childhood illness, and school failures; and it costs $26 billion annually. Attempts to explain preterm birth disparity have focused on social stressors of neighborhood environment and racial discrimination. These social stressors increase psychological stress and are related to preterm birth. Psychological stress and its associated inflammation [e.g., interleukin (IL)-6] are also associated with preterm birth. In contrast, personal resources (e.g., coping, social support) ameliorate stress and have protective effects on preterm birth. Guided by the Stress and Coping model and the Psychoneuroimmunology framework, we examined the relationships among neighborhood environment, racial discrimination, psychological stress, personal resources, inflammation and preterm birth. Methods: Using a longitudinal descriptive correlational design, we enrolled 114 pregnant African American women. Women completed questionnaires and had blood draw at 16-22 weeks and 26-32 weeks.Birth data were collected from medical records. ' Results: 'Women who reported higher levels of perceived neighborhood stressors and more experiences of racial discrimination also reported higher levels of psychological stress and lower levels of personal resources. Psychological stress was related to higher levels of inflammation (IL-6, IL-8). Compared with women with full term birth, women with preterm birth had higher levels of psychological stress as early as 19 weeks gestation. Finally, psychological stress mediated the effects of neighborhood stressors on preterm birth.' 'Conclusion: These results suggest that (1) social stressors are related to psychological stress and inflammation; (2) psychological stress is related to inflammation; and (3) women with preterm birth have higher levels of psychological stress. Knowledge of the social context of African American women's lives can generate new perspectives for future research, new interventions to reduce racial disparities in preterm birth, improve child outcomes and ultimately reduce the emotional burdens to families.
Keywords:
preterm birth; inflammation; stress
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15L08
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleSocial Stressors, Inflammation and Preterm Birth in African-American Womenen
dc.title.alternativeDepression in Women: Research Regarding Mental Health Stressors and Status [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorGiurgescu, Carmenen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsCarmen Giurgescu, RN, WHNP, carmen.giurgescu@wayne.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601792-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: In 2012 in the United States, 11.5% of infants were born prematurely (<37 weeks) and African American women had almost twice the rates of preterm birth compared with non-Hispanic white women. Preterm birth is associated with neonatal mortality and morbidity, childhood illness, and school failures; and it costs $26 billion annually. Attempts to explain preterm birth disparity have focused on social stressors of neighborhood environment and racial discrimination. These social stressors increase psychological stress and are related to preterm birth. Psychological stress and its associated inflammation [e.g., interleukin (IL)-6] are also associated with preterm birth. In contrast, personal resources (e.g., coping, social support) ameliorate stress and have protective effects on preterm birth. Guided by the Stress and Coping model and the Psychoneuroimmunology framework, we examined the relationships among neighborhood environment, racial discrimination, psychological stress, personal resources, inflammation and preterm birth. Methods: Using a longitudinal descriptive correlational design, we enrolled 114 pregnant African American women. Women completed questionnaires and had blood draw at 16-22 weeks and 26-32 weeks.Birth data were collected from medical records. ' Results: 'Women who reported higher levels of perceived neighborhood stressors and more experiences of racial discrimination also reported higher levels of psychological stress and lower levels of personal resources. Psychological stress was related to higher levels of inflammation (IL-6, IL-8). Compared with women with full term birth, women with preterm birth had higher levels of psychological stress as early as 19 weeks gestation. Finally, psychological stress mediated the effects of neighborhood stressors on preterm birth.' 'Conclusion: These results suggest that (1) social stressors are related to psychological stress and inflammation; (2) psychological stress is related to inflammation; and (3) women with preterm birth have higher levels of psychological stress. Knowledge of the social context of African American women's lives can generate new perspectives for future research, new interventions to reduce racial disparities in preterm birth, improve child outcomes and ultimately reduce the emotional burdens to families.en
dc.subjectpreterm birthen
dc.subjectinflammationen
dc.subjectstressen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:55:39Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:55:39Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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