Identifying Bedside Staff Nurse Barriers and Facilitators in Moving from an RN to a BSN Degree

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601795
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identifying Bedside Staff Nurse Barriers and Facilitators in Moving from an RN to a BSN Degree
Other Titles:
Leadership Education for Nursing Students [Session]
Author(s):
Graham, Shannon M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu
Author Details:
Shannon M. Graham, RN, NE-BC, sgraham@uabmc.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Recognizing the IOM recommendation of 80% BSN by 2020, one large academic medical center conducted a study in order to answer the question 'What are the perceived barriers and facilitators of associate degree staff nurses returning to school to obtain a BSN?' With a nursing force of approximately 3,000 registered nurses, this hospital's current rate of BSN prepared nurses was at 48.7% with 48.6% holding an Associate degree, clearly indicating a need to formulate a plan of action. As a teaching hospital, higher education is not only promoted and encouraged, but also supported through a tuition reimbursement program. However, the relatively low number of nursing staff with an associate's degree currently in school to obtain a BSN indicated that more than a tuition reimbursement program was needed for staff to enroll in school. The purpose of the study was to identify the barriers and facilitators for returning to school to obtain a BSN degree. Methods: Email invitations were sent to bedside nurses with an associate's degree asking them to participate in one of six focus groups. Facilitated by the study investigators, each focus group was asked questions designed to identify their perceived barriers and facilitators to returning to school for a BSN. Information gathered from the focus groups was used to create a 15 item survey which was sent via email to bedside nursing staff to further evaluate the barriers. The survey was designed as a likert scale using an online survey tool. Results: Twenty bedside staff nurses participated in the six focus groups. The themes identified by participants as barriers included family obligations; money, including books, fee's, and work schedule; difficulty and need to obtain pre-requisites, and lack of support from nursing management. The themes were incorporated into a survey. Results from the survey echoed the focus group themes with the greatest barriers identified as cost of education, family obligations, work schedule, and time. Participants identified the following as facilitators for returning to school: support from family and co-workers, online classes, personal growth, and personal satisfaction. Conclusion: Bedside staff nurses want to pursue higher education but feel they lack the resources, direction, support, and encouragement. Through collaboration with school of nursing faculty, hospital nursing leadership can create structures to support bedside staff nurses in returning to school for a BSN.
Keywords:
education; leadership; bedside nurse
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15E13
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleIdentifying Bedside Staff Nurse Barriers and Facilitators in Moving from an RN to a BSN Degreeen
dc.title.alternativeLeadership Education for Nursing Students [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Shannon M.en
dc.contributor.departmentNuen
dc.author.detailsShannon M. Graham, RN, NE-BC, sgraham@uabmc.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601795-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Recognizing the IOM recommendation of 80% BSN by 2020, one large academic medical center conducted a study in order to answer the question 'What are the perceived barriers and facilitators of associate degree staff nurses returning to school to obtain a BSN?' With a nursing force of approximately 3,000 registered nurses, this hospital's current rate of BSN prepared nurses was at 48.7% with 48.6% holding an Associate degree, clearly indicating a need to formulate a plan of action. As a teaching hospital, higher education is not only promoted and encouraged, but also supported through a tuition reimbursement program. However, the relatively low number of nursing staff with an associate's degree currently in school to obtain a BSN indicated that more than a tuition reimbursement program was needed for staff to enroll in school. The purpose of the study was to identify the barriers and facilitators for returning to school to obtain a BSN degree. Methods: Email invitations were sent to bedside nurses with an associate's degree asking them to participate in one of six focus groups. Facilitated by the study investigators, each focus group was asked questions designed to identify their perceived barriers and facilitators to returning to school for a BSN. Information gathered from the focus groups was used to create a 15 item survey which was sent via email to bedside nursing staff to further evaluate the barriers. The survey was designed as a likert scale using an online survey tool. Results: Twenty bedside staff nurses participated in the six focus groups. The themes identified by participants as barriers included family obligations; money, including books, fee's, and work schedule; difficulty and need to obtain pre-requisites, and lack of support from nursing management. The themes were incorporated into a survey. Results from the survey echoed the focus group themes with the greatest barriers identified as cost of education, family obligations, work schedule, and time. Participants identified the following as facilitators for returning to school: support from family and co-workers, online classes, personal growth, and personal satisfaction. Conclusion: Bedside staff nurses want to pursue higher education but feel they lack the resources, direction, support, and encouragement. Through collaboration with school of nursing faculty, hospital nursing leadership can create structures to support bedside staff nurses in returning to school for a BSN.en
dc.subjecteducationen
dc.subjectleadershipen
dc.subjectbedside nurseen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:55:44Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:55:44Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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