Outcomes of a Bystander Intervention Service Learning Project in a Pre-Licensure Nursing Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601802
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of a Bystander Intervention Service Learning Project in a Pre-Licensure Nursing Program
Other Titles:
Research Affecting Pre-Licensure Nursing Student Education [Session]
Author(s):
Hensel, Desiree; Decker, Kim Alexander
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha
Author Details:
Desiree Hensel, RN, PCNS-BC, CNE, dehensel@iu.edu; Kim Alexander Decker, RN, CNS
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this project was to explore outcomes from the integration of a bystander intervention, service learning project into a pre-licensure nursing program.'The bystander effect is a well- known social phenomena where ambiguity and diffusion of responsibility result in the failure of individuals to assist others in need (Bennett, Banyard, & Garnhart, 2014; Darley & Latane, 1968). Alarming trends in preventable injuries and assaults among college students have led some campuses to explore ways to teach bystander intervention as a means to improve safety and well-being (Coker et al., 2011; Gidycz, Orchowski, & Berkowitz, 2011; Reid, Irwin, & Dye, 2013). Specifically, one large public university in the Midwestern United States created a campus-wide, bystander intervention initiative to promote awareness, compassion, and courage among students called 'Culture of Care.' The initiative focuses on improving sexual well-being, mental health, alcohol and drug awareness, and respect among students. 'Consistent with the American Nurses Association's (ANA, 2014) position that nurses have an ethical responsibility to collaborate with the public to improve the health and safety of communities, we created a service learning project at the same university in a beginning level nursing course to support the Culture of Care initiative. The research questions that guided this study were 'How did the nursing students improve the campus's well-being?' and 'How did participation in the bystander intervention service learning project help promote students' professional development?'' Methods: We obtained IRB approval to conduct this mixed-method study. Over the course of two years, all BSN students enrolled in a required entry level, Healthy Populations clinical course (N=120) participated in a 4-hour training on bystander intervention. Students then received instructions to spend a minimum of 6 hours engaging in activities of their choice that promoted a least one of the four Culture of Care focus areas over the course of the semester. Students recorded their hours in their clinical logs and reflected on their experience through group discussion and in a written journal. 'We used a case study design to gain a holistic understanding of the intended and unexpected project outcomes. Quantitative data from student's time logs was mapped to qualitative data from the students' reflective journals using Dedoose Version 5.0.11software. Results: Data showed that the majority of students (77%) devoted at least part of their hours to the drug and alcohol awareness focus area. Students served the university by spending their time acting as sober monitors or designated drivers (324 hours), creating alternative to drinking activities (269 hours), joining groups or attending meetings related to the Culture of Care focus areas (177 hours), participating in community awareness events (77 hours), taking friends to Culture of Care related lectures (75 hours), and working with small groups or individuals (62 hours). 'Approximately one third of the students (35%) described a specific incidence where they used their training in bystander intervention to assist an individual in need beyond acting as their designated driver.' Analysis of student journals revealed that students engaged in caring occasions while gaining skills as leaders, activists, and educators, and participation in this project helped the majority of students appreciate their personal responsibility in community safety. Conclusion: While this pilot project involved 120 students dedicating a total of over 980 hours to campus well-being, the student logs suggested the impact was much further reaching. Nurses are leaders and advocates who have a moral responsibility to promote the health and safety of all people (ANA, 2014), but traditional methods used in pre- licensure education have not always led to the development of strong leaders (Hensel & Laux, 2014; Hensel, Middleton, & Engs, 2014). Very early in the curriculum, this service learning project gave novice nurses an opportunity to cultivate professional skills and values, including those related to safety and leadership, while functioning in a fairly independent manner. Future research is needed to determine if learning to act when things are not right in a community setting will transfer to the acute care setting where all team members are expected to intervene about safety concerns.
Keywords:
Nursing Education; Bystander Intervention; Professional Values
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15L07
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleOutcomes of a Bystander Intervention Service Learning Project in a Pre-Licensure Nursing Programen
dc.title.alternativeResearch Affecting Pre-Licensure Nursing Student Education [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorHensel, Desireeen
dc.contributor.authorDecker, Kim Alexanderen
dc.contributor.departmentAlphaen
dc.author.detailsDesiree Hensel, RN, PCNS-BC, CNE, dehensel@iu.edu; Kim Alexander Decker, RN, CNSen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601802-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this project was to explore outcomes from the integration of a bystander intervention, service learning project into a pre-licensure nursing program.'The bystander effect is a well- known social phenomena where ambiguity and diffusion of responsibility result in the failure of individuals to assist others in need (Bennett, Banyard, & Garnhart, 2014; Darley & Latane, 1968). Alarming trends in preventable injuries and assaults among college students have led some campuses to explore ways to teach bystander intervention as a means to improve safety and well-being (Coker et al., 2011; Gidycz, Orchowski, & Berkowitz, 2011; Reid, Irwin, & Dye, 2013). Specifically, one large public university in the Midwestern United States created a campus-wide, bystander intervention initiative to promote awareness, compassion, and courage among students called 'Culture of Care.' The initiative focuses on improving sexual well-being, mental health, alcohol and drug awareness, and respect among students. 'Consistent with the American Nurses Association's (ANA, 2014) position that nurses have an ethical responsibility to collaborate with the public to improve the health and safety of communities, we created a service learning project at the same university in a beginning level nursing course to support the Culture of Care initiative. The research questions that guided this study were 'How did the nursing students improve the campus's well-being?' and 'How did participation in the bystander intervention service learning project help promote students' professional development?'' Methods: We obtained IRB approval to conduct this mixed-method study. Over the course of two years, all BSN students enrolled in a required entry level, Healthy Populations clinical course (N=120) participated in a 4-hour training on bystander intervention. Students then received instructions to spend a minimum of 6 hours engaging in activities of their choice that promoted a least one of the four Culture of Care focus areas over the course of the semester. Students recorded their hours in their clinical logs and reflected on their experience through group discussion and in a written journal. 'We used a case study design to gain a holistic understanding of the intended and unexpected project outcomes. Quantitative data from student's time logs was mapped to qualitative data from the students' reflective journals using Dedoose Version 5.0.11software. Results: Data showed that the majority of students (77%) devoted at least part of their hours to the drug and alcohol awareness focus area. Students served the university by spending their time acting as sober monitors or designated drivers (324 hours), creating alternative to drinking activities (269 hours), joining groups or attending meetings related to the Culture of Care focus areas (177 hours), participating in community awareness events (77 hours), taking friends to Culture of Care related lectures (75 hours), and working with small groups or individuals (62 hours). 'Approximately one third of the students (35%) described a specific incidence where they used their training in bystander intervention to assist an individual in need beyond acting as their designated driver.' Analysis of student journals revealed that students engaged in caring occasions while gaining skills as leaders, activists, and educators, and participation in this project helped the majority of students appreciate their personal responsibility in community safety. Conclusion: While this pilot project involved 120 students dedicating a total of over 980 hours to campus well-being, the student logs suggested the impact was much further reaching. Nurses are leaders and advocates who have a moral responsibility to promote the health and safety of all people (ANA, 2014), but traditional methods used in pre- licensure education have not always led to the development of strong leaders (Hensel & Laux, 2014; Hensel, Middleton, & Engs, 2014). Very early in the curriculum, this service learning project gave novice nurses an opportunity to cultivate professional skills and values, including those related to safety and leadership, while functioning in a fairly independent manner. Future research is needed to determine if learning to act when things are not right in a community setting will transfer to the acute care setting where all team members are expected to intervene about safety concerns.en
dc.subjectNursing Educationen
dc.subjectBystander Interventionen
dc.subjectProfessional Valuesen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:55:54Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:55:54Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.