2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601809
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of an Immersion Experience in the Dominican Republic
Other Titles:
Service Learning Initiatives [Session]
Author(s):
Etienne, Marie O.; Messmer, Patricia R.; Blot, Guerna; Henri, Nancy; Manos, Patrick; Williams, Marjorie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Marie O. Etienne, ARNP, PLNC, metienne@mdc.edu; Patricia R. Messmer, RN-BC, FAAN; Guerna Blot, ARNP, FNP-BC, OCN; Nancy Henri, RN; Patrick Manos, RN; Marjorie Williams, ARNP/FNP-BC
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: IntroductionThe Haitian American Nurses Association (HANA)' joined forces with the Haitian Professional Coalition (HAPC) and the Bejam'n Le'n School of Nursing Miami Dade College (MDC) since 2005 to care for the migrant workers in the Dominican Republic. HANA'organized and conducted medical missions in various 'Bateyes' (sugarcane plantations) in the Dominican Republic to provide healthcare and supplies to the migrant workers living in impoverished conditions. 'On March 16-23, 2013, 15 RN-BSN participated in the immersion project, similar to Gonzalez 's (2013) immersive experience. Students collected over 375 book bags filled with school supplies while HANA received donations of'medications 'and clothing. HANA,HAPC and MDC partnered with Universidad Central del Este (UCE) medical school to work collaboratively in the Bateyes.' RN-BSN' received service-learning hours for the immersion experience'(Chen et al, 2012; Stallwood @ Groh, 2013). ProblemThese migrant workers have a life of poverty and hardship. They are prone to 'gastro-intestinal (GERD), hypertension and cardiac problems along with vitamin deficiencies and respiratory illnesses. Methodology Descriptive, exploratory study Results: At all the Bateys, 'women and children stood in lines to undergo a physical assessment exam and receive medication and treatment for their conditions. Fewer men were seen since they were working in the sugarcane fields.' ''Of 1098 patients seen during the one-week mission, 503 charts (50%) 'were analyzed. Demographics- The largest age group was the 12-21 for 26% and the smallest age group was 77-87+ for 3%.; newborn-5 years and 66-76% 'accounted for 5%; 6-11 for 14%; 22-32 and 33-43 for'17%; 44-54 for 11%; 55-65 for 9%. There were more females (65%) than males (35%) due to their working in the sugar cane fields. There more physicians/medical students (72%) treating the patients compared to the ARNPs (29%) treating the workers and families. The most common diagnosis was GI, especially GERD, epigastric and abdominal pain with' poor appetite (44%) with Neuro (27%) headache and seizures; GU (21%) bladder infections and yeast infections and STIs; Muscosketeton (20%) back, knee and shoulder pain; ENT (17%)' eye, now and throat problems; Derm (15%) tinea corpis and skin disorders; Resp (13%) asthma and respiratory infections; 'Cardiac (11%) cardiac problems and hypertension, Hema (5%) blood disorders. Many had multiple diagnosis; several were diagnosed with cholera and PTSD resulting from the 2012 Haiti Earthquake. Discussion 'The conditions at the 2nd batey were deplorable with 10-12 workers (both men and women) living in a very small unit. The women prepared their only meal in the unit where they reside while the men workers were in the fields. The workers slept on iron bunk beds with no mattresses. There was neither electricity nor water. There was no education provided to the children of these sugar cane workers. Conditions have deteriorated in some bateyes to the point that one of the patients wanted to give her baby to one of the RN-BSN students. The mother was having a difficult time caring for the baby and could no longer support all her children. One could only imagine the poor mother's anguish over wanting to give up her child. In all the Bateyes, RN-BSN students and and UCE medical students provided education to the children on hygiene, safety, growing-up healthy, and teeth brushing, hygiene, disease prevention and health promotion. They taught the adults how to use a condom stressing prevention of HIV/AIDS and STIs. 'There were many sad cases. In one instance a child with cerebral palsy was not attending school since there were no available wheelchairs. The child laid on the floor morning and night and even got wet during rain storms due to the substandard housing and leaking roofs. One of the challenges faced by ARNPs/nursing students, physicians/medical students was how much medication to prescribe or give since many medications required follow-up and there was no guarantee of follow-up care or any monitoring. There was only one clinic at the medical school that these families could attend for follow-up care. Conclusion The one-week immersion project provided RN-BSN students with opportunities they would not often see in clinical agencies in the United States.' Lives were saved, hearts were touched, tears were shed; lives have changed forever by the overwhelming experience. Once could never imagine living in such conditions, yet, we feel fortunate and blessed to be able to help others in need as we count our blessings. It is difficult to imagine the horrendous conditions that these poverty stricken families endure and try to live their daily lives.
Keywords:
Immersion expereince; Service-learning project; Dominican Republic
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15J09
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleOutcomes of an Immersion Experience in the Dominican Republicen
dc.title.alternativeService Learning Initiatives [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorEtienne, Marie O.en
dc.contributor.authorMessmer, Patricia R.en
dc.contributor.authorBlot, Guernaen
dc.contributor.authorHenri, Nancyen
dc.contributor.authorManos, Patricken
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Marjorieen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsMarie O. Etienne, ARNP, PLNC, metienne@mdc.edu; Patricia R. Messmer, RN-BC, FAAN; Guerna Blot, ARNP, FNP-BC, OCN; Nancy Henri, RN; Patrick Manos, RN; Marjorie Williams, ARNP/FNP-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601809-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: IntroductionThe Haitian American Nurses Association (HANA)' joined forces with the Haitian Professional Coalition (HAPC) and the Bejam'n Le'n School of Nursing Miami Dade College (MDC) since 2005 to care for the migrant workers in the Dominican Republic. HANA'organized and conducted medical missions in various 'Bateyes' (sugarcane plantations) in the Dominican Republic to provide healthcare and supplies to the migrant workers living in impoverished conditions. 'On March 16-23, 2013, 15 RN-BSN participated in the immersion project, similar to Gonzalez 's (2013) immersive experience. Students collected over 375 book bags filled with school supplies while HANA received donations of'medications 'and clothing. HANA,HAPC and MDC partnered with Universidad Central del Este (UCE) medical school to work collaboratively in the Bateyes.' RN-BSN' received service-learning hours for the immersion experience'(Chen et al, 2012; Stallwood @ Groh, 2013). ProblemThese migrant workers have a life of poverty and hardship. They are prone to 'gastro-intestinal (GERD), hypertension and cardiac problems along with vitamin deficiencies and respiratory illnesses. Methodology Descriptive, exploratory study Results: At all the Bateys, 'women and children stood in lines to undergo a physical assessment exam and receive medication and treatment for their conditions. Fewer men were seen since they were working in the sugarcane fields.' ''Of 1098 patients seen during the one-week mission, 503 charts (50%) 'were analyzed. Demographics- The largest age group was the 12-21 for 26% and the smallest age group was 77-87+ for 3%.; newborn-5 years and 66-76% 'accounted for 5%; 6-11 for 14%; 22-32 and 33-43 for'17%; 44-54 for 11%; 55-65 for 9%. There were more females (65%) than males (35%) due to their working in the sugar cane fields. There more physicians/medical students (72%) treating the patients compared to the ARNPs (29%) treating the workers and families. The most common diagnosis was GI, especially GERD, epigastric and abdominal pain with' poor appetite (44%) with Neuro (27%) headache and seizures; GU (21%) bladder infections and yeast infections and STIs; Muscosketeton (20%) back, knee and shoulder pain; ENT (17%)' eye, now and throat problems; Derm (15%) tinea corpis and skin disorders; Resp (13%) asthma and respiratory infections; 'Cardiac (11%) cardiac problems and hypertension, Hema (5%) blood disorders. Many had multiple diagnosis; several were diagnosed with cholera and PTSD resulting from the 2012 Haiti Earthquake. Discussion 'The conditions at the 2nd batey were deplorable with 10-12 workers (both men and women) living in a very small unit. The women prepared their only meal in the unit where they reside while the men workers were in the fields. The workers slept on iron bunk beds with no mattresses. There was neither electricity nor water. There was no education provided to the children of these sugar cane workers. Conditions have deteriorated in some bateyes to the point that one of the patients wanted to give her baby to one of the RN-BSN students. The mother was having a difficult time caring for the baby and could no longer support all her children. One could only imagine the poor mother's anguish over wanting to give up her child. In all the Bateyes, RN-BSN students and and UCE medical students provided education to the children on hygiene, safety, growing-up healthy, and teeth brushing, hygiene, disease prevention and health promotion. They taught the adults how to use a condom stressing prevention of HIV/AIDS and STIs. 'There were many sad cases. In one instance a child with cerebral palsy was not attending school since there were no available wheelchairs. The child laid on the floor morning and night and even got wet during rain storms due to the substandard housing and leaking roofs. One of the challenges faced by ARNPs/nursing students, physicians/medical students was how much medication to prescribe or give since many medications required follow-up and there was no guarantee of follow-up care or any monitoring. There was only one clinic at the medical school that these families could attend for follow-up care. Conclusion The one-week immersion project provided RN-BSN students with opportunities they would not often see in clinical agencies in the United States.' Lives were saved, hearts were touched, tears were shed; lives have changed forever by the overwhelming experience. Once could never imagine living in such conditions, yet, we feel fortunate and blessed to be able to help others in need as we count our blessings. It is difficult to imagine the horrendous conditions that these poverty stricken families endure and try to live their daily lives.en
dc.subjectImmersion expereinceen
dc.subjectService-learning projecten
dc.subjectDominican Republicen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:56:05Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:56:05Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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