Improvement in Student Satisfaction and Confidence Levels through Simulation Activities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601810
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improvement in Student Satisfaction and Confidence Levels through Simulation Activities
Other Titles:
Use of Simulation to Improve Student Confidence [Session]
Author(s):
Cummings, Cynthia; Connelly, Linda K.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Rho at-large
Author Details:
Cynthia Cummings, RN, cynthia.cummings@unf.edu; Linda K. Connelly, ARNP
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: This research explored whether nursing students' learning satisfaction and confidence scores improved in simulation experiences, as they progressed from junior to senior year.' 'Methods: The students were asked to voluntarily participate in a survey on learning satisfaction and self-confidence following a simulation activity. The student scores were compared between juniors and seniors for each item. Survey data was collected for a one year time frame and was approved by the University's institutional review board. The instrument utilized was the: Student Satisfaction with Learning Scale and the Self-Confidence in Learning Using Simulations Scale (Jeffries & Rizzolo, 2006). Results: The results demonstrated that for eight items specifically linked to satisfaction and confidence levels, there was significant improvement in the average score. The mean averages for each item were compared using a t-test for significance of means. A p value <.001 was obtained for the following eight items: 'I am confident that I am mastering the content of the simulation activity that my instructors presented to me;' 'I am confident that the simulation covered critical content necessary for the mastery of medical surgical curriculum;' 'I am confident that I am developing the skills and obtaining the required knowledge from this simulation to perform necessary tasks in a clinical setting;' 'I know how to use simulation activities to learn critical aspects of these skills;' 'I actively participated in the debriefing session after the simulation;' 'I had the opportunity to put more thought into my comments during the debriefing session;' 'There were enough opportunities in the simulation to find out if I clearly understand the material;' ' Using simulation activities made my learning time more productive.' Conclusion: The faculty will continue to survey upcoming students and assess simulation activities in order to develop and improve student learning and confidence. Oermann, Poole-Dawkins, Alvarez, Foster and O'Sullivan (2010) reported that nurse managers described new graduates as lacking confidence in their clinical skills and rely unnecessarily on staff for second opinions. Real life simulations allow students the opportunity to practice clinical skills and refine decision making in an effort to develop confidence in their own abilities (Gaberson & Oermann, 2010; Swenty & Eggleston, 2010; Pike & O'Donnell, 2009).Thidemann and Soderhamn (2012) reported that satisfaction and self-confidence in learning were both highly rated in simulation groups and these activities may bridge the gap between theory and clinical practice. In all, it is imperative that faculty look at multiple ways to educate our students in a fast moving and ever-changing clinical environment. A variety of simulation activities provide an invaluable method to engage and develop student confidence.
Keywords:
Simulation; Confidence levels; Student Satisfaction
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15I16
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleImprovement in Student Satisfaction and Confidence Levels through Simulation Activitiesen
dc.title.alternativeUse of Simulation to Improve Student Confidence [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorCummings, Cynthiaen
dc.contributor.authorConnelly, Linda K.en
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Rho at-largeen
dc.author.detailsCynthia Cummings, RN, cynthia.cummings@unf.edu; Linda K. Connelly, ARNPen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601810-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: This research explored whether nursing students' learning satisfaction and confidence scores improved in simulation experiences, as they progressed from junior to senior year.' 'Methods: The students were asked to voluntarily participate in a survey on learning satisfaction and self-confidence following a simulation activity. The student scores were compared between juniors and seniors for each item. Survey data was collected for a one year time frame and was approved by the University's institutional review board. The instrument utilized was the: Student Satisfaction with Learning Scale and the Self-Confidence in Learning Using Simulations Scale (Jeffries & Rizzolo, 2006). Results: The results demonstrated that for eight items specifically linked to satisfaction and confidence levels, there was significant improvement in the average score. The mean averages for each item were compared using a t-test for significance of means. A p value <.001 was obtained for the following eight items: 'I am confident that I am mastering the content of the simulation activity that my instructors presented to me;' 'I am confident that the simulation covered critical content necessary for the mastery of medical surgical curriculum;' 'I am confident that I am developing the skills and obtaining the required knowledge from this simulation to perform necessary tasks in a clinical setting;' 'I know how to use simulation activities to learn critical aspects of these skills;' 'I actively participated in the debriefing session after the simulation;' 'I had the opportunity to put more thought into my comments during the debriefing session;' 'There were enough opportunities in the simulation to find out if I clearly understand the material;' ' Using simulation activities made my learning time more productive.' Conclusion: The faculty will continue to survey upcoming students and assess simulation activities in order to develop and improve student learning and confidence. Oermann, Poole-Dawkins, Alvarez, Foster and O'Sullivan (2010) reported that nurse managers described new graduates as lacking confidence in their clinical skills and rely unnecessarily on staff for second opinions. Real life simulations allow students the opportunity to practice clinical skills and refine decision making in an effort to develop confidence in their own abilities (Gaberson & Oermann, 2010; Swenty & Eggleston, 2010; Pike & O'Donnell, 2009).Thidemann and Soderhamn (2012) reported that satisfaction and self-confidence in learning were both highly rated in simulation groups and these activities may bridge the gap between theory and clinical practice. In all, it is imperative that faculty look at multiple ways to educate our students in a fast moving and ever-changing clinical environment. A variety of simulation activities provide an invaluable method to engage and develop student confidence.en
dc.subjectSimulationen
dc.subjectConfidence levelsen
dc.subjectStudent Satisfactionen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:56:07Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:56:07Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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