2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601811
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Emergency Nurse's Perception of Incivility in the Workplace
Other Titles:
Factors Affecting Nurse Satisfaction and Retention [Session]
Author(s):
Manley, Dana; Byers, Dina; Garth, Katy; Kuiper, Betty
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Epsilon
Author Details:
Dana Manley, APRN, RN, dmanley@murraystate.edu; Dina Byers; Katy Garth; Betty Kuiper
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Workplace incivility is defined as low-intensity deviant behavior with ambiguous intent to harm the target, in violation of workplace norms for mutual respect. 'Uncivil behaviors are characteristically rude, discourteous, displaying a lack of respect for others" (Anderson & Pearson, 1999, p. 457). Incivility among nurses is a growing problem. Uncivil behavior can cause nurses to experience post-traumatic stress disorder and symptoms such as low self-esteem, anxiety, sleep disturbance, recurrent nightmares, and depression (Mikkelsen & Einarsen, 2002). Research to date has focused on nurses in general with little research examining incivility among nurses who work in Emergency Departments. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the perception of incivility among nurses who work in Emergency Departments. Methods: Workplace incivility experienced by nurses is a growing problem. Uncivil behavior can cause nurses to experience post-traumatic stress disorder and symptoms such as low self-esteem, anxiety, sleep disturbance, recurrent nightmares, and depression (Mikkelsen & Einarsen, 2002). This descriptive study used the Nursing Incivility Scale (Guidroz, Burnfield-Geimer, Clark, Schwetschenau, & Jex, 2010) to identify incivility experienced by Emergency Department (ED) Nurses from several institutions. Results: Results revealed that 62.6% (n=80) of the 129 participating ED nurses reported that they had experienced uncivil behavior in the workplace. Twenty-one percent (n=27) of the nurses left a job as a result of uncivil behavior. Over 50% (n=50) indicated that they had reported uncivil behavior to a supervisor with 33.9% (n=22) stating they were not taken seriously. Over half of those surveyed reported that hospital employees raise their voices when frustrated and blame others for their mistakes. The most commonly reported uncivil behavior displayed by nurses was gossiping about others. Physicians and families were identified as the two non-nurse groups most likely to take their frustrations out on nurses in an uncivil manner. Conclusion: A better understanding of the experience of workplace incivility is the first step in solving the problem of workplace incivility. Examining these perceptions will allow for the creation of interventions aimed at reversing this problem. Effective communication between nurses, physicians, and family members appears to be the second step in reducing uncivil behavior and ultimately improving job satisfaction which in turn will improve health outcomes.
Keywords:
incivility; emergencey room; nurses
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15F05
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Emergency Nurse's Perception of Incivility in the Workplaceen
dc.title.alternativeFactors Affecting Nurse Satisfaction and Retention [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorManley, Danaen
dc.contributor.authorByers, Dinaen
dc.contributor.authorGarth, Katyen
dc.contributor.authorKuiper, Bettyen
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Epsilonen
dc.author.detailsDana Manley, APRN, RN, dmanley@murraystate.edu; Dina Byers; Katy Garth; Betty Kuiperen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601811-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Workplace incivility is defined as low-intensity deviant behavior with ambiguous intent to harm the target, in violation of workplace norms for mutual respect. 'Uncivil behaviors are characteristically rude, discourteous, displaying a lack of respect for others" (Anderson & Pearson, 1999, p. 457). Incivility among nurses is a growing problem. Uncivil behavior can cause nurses to experience post-traumatic stress disorder and symptoms such as low self-esteem, anxiety, sleep disturbance, recurrent nightmares, and depression (Mikkelsen & Einarsen, 2002). Research to date has focused on nurses in general with little research examining incivility among nurses who work in Emergency Departments. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the perception of incivility among nurses who work in Emergency Departments. Methods: Workplace incivility experienced by nurses is a growing problem. Uncivil behavior can cause nurses to experience post-traumatic stress disorder and symptoms such as low self-esteem, anxiety, sleep disturbance, recurrent nightmares, and depression (Mikkelsen & Einarsen, 2002). This descriptive study used the Nursing Incivility Scale (Guidroz, Burnfield-Geimer, Clark, Schwetschenau, & Jex, 2010) to identify incivility experienced by Emergency Department (ED) Nurses from several institutions. Results: Results revealed that 62.6% (n=80) of the 129 participating ED nurses reported that they had experienced uncivil behavior in the workplace. Twenty-one percent (n=27) of the nurses left a job as a result of uncivil behavior. Over 50% (n=50) indicated that they had reported uncivil behavior to a supervisor with 33.9% (n=22) stating they were not taken seriously. Over half of those surveyed reported that hospital employees raise their voices when frustrated and blame others for their mistakes. The most commonly reported uncivil behavior displayed by nurses was gossiping about others. Physicians and families were identified as the two non-nurse groups most likely to take their frustrations out on nurses in an uncivil manner. Conclusion: A better understanding of the experience of workplace incivility is the first step in solving the problem of workplace incivility. Examining these perceptions will allow for the creation of interventions aimed at reversing this problem. Effective communication between nurses, physicians, and family members appears to be the second step in reducing uncivil behavior and ultimately improving job satisfaction which in turn will improve health outcomes.en
dc.subjectincivilityen
dc.subjectemergencey roomen
dc.subjectnursesen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:56:08Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:56:08Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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