2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601816
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning Together While Using the Intravenous Simulator
Other Titles:
Using Simulation in the Classroom [Session]
Author(s):
McWilliams, Lenora
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Lenora McWilliams, RN, LMcWilliams1@twu.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: Inserting an intravenous catheter is the most challenging and complex skill taught in nursing school. Simulators provide opportunity for students to practice and perfect skills in a safe non-threatening environment while making errors without harm or discomfort to a patient. Haptic IV simulators allow students to practice IV procedures repeatedly on complex patients while developing proficiency and critical learning skills. Cooperative learning is a form of active learning and is defined as the instructional use of small groups of students working together in order to complete a task or goal. In this research project nursing students worked together in cooperative groups to complete the task of learning how to insert an IV using the haptic IV simulator. Methods: A 2 X 3 split plot related measure ANOVA with the between subjects factor of timing of the simulation with two levels (BEFORE or AFTER lab skills day) and the within subjects related factor of ordinal position with 3 levels (1st, 2nd or 3rd individual to attempt the simulation) evaluated the differences on the initial numerical score received on the IV simulator. Students were randomly assigned to the BEFORE or AFTER group and randomized a second time to their within group ordinal position during their simulated activity. After completing an orientation on the simulator, the nursing student entered the IV simulator and completed their initial attempt. Each group of three students worked together to individually complete the task. Within group members were encouraged to give suggestions, feedback and support to their group during their individual simulation. Results: Results indicated that student's ordinal position was significant when learning together and accounted for more than 41% of the variances: Ordinal Position F (1.765, 28.245) = 12.071, p < .001, ?2 = .416. Bonferoni post hoc pairwise tests indicated that the individual who attempted the simulation second learned as a result of observing the first individual to attempt the simulation. The third individual in the group also learned as a result of observing the first individual to attempt the simulation. However in this research, there was no statistically significant difference for the third individual who attempted the simulation learning as a result of observing the second individual. The timing of the simulation and interaction were not significant in this research. Conclusion: Individuals learn together by working in small cooperative groups. Cooperative groups provide the opportunity to discuss and work though problems. Group members are accountable and they must actively participate in order for individual and group success. Learning together has implications for all health care providers, faculty and students. Using simulated environments along with learning together is applicable to many areas of healthcare. Simulated environments provide safe experiences for student nurses who are currently losing clinical sites and it could be beneficial for teams of providers while practicing emergency procedures. Using simulated environments could also be useful for providing opportunities for inter-professional collaboration and research. Future research would include replication or working with cooperative groups while using other types of simulators or technology.
Keywords:
Cooperative Learning; Haptic IV Simulators; Nursing Student
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15L06
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleLearning Together While Using the Intravenous Simulatoren
dc.title.alternativeUsing Simulation in the Classroom [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorMcWilliams, Lenoraen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsLenora McWilliams, RN, LMcWilliams1@twu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601816-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: Inserting an intravenous catheter is the most challenging and complex skill taught in nursing school. Simulators provide opportunity for students to practice and perfect skills in a safe non-threatening environment while making errors without harm or discomfort to a patient. Haptic IV simulators allow students to practice IV procedures repeatedly on complex patients while developing proficiency and critical learning skills. Cooperative learning is a form of active learning and is defined as the instructional use of small groups of students working together in order to complete a task or goal. In this research project nursing students worked together in cooperative groups to complete the task of learning how to insert an IV using the haptic IV simulator. Methods: A 2 X 3 split plot related measure ANOVA with the between subjects factor of timing of the simulation with two levels (BEFORE or AFTER lab skills day) and the within subjects related factor of ordinal position with 3 levels (1st, 2nd or 3rd individual to attempt the simulation) evaluated the differences on the initial numerical score received on the IV simulator. Students were randomly assigned to the BEFORE or AFTER group and randomized a second time to their within group ordinal position during their simulated activity. After completing an orientation on the simulator, the nursing student entered the IV simulator and completed their initial attempt. Each group of three students worked together to individually complete the task. Within group members were encouraged to give suggestions, feedback and support to their group during their individual simulation. Results: Results indicated that student's ordinal position was significant when learning together and accounted for more than 41% of the variances: Ordinal Position F (1.765, 28.245) = 12.071, p < .001, ?2 = .416. Bonferoni post hoc pairwise tests indicated that the individual who attempted the simulation second learned as a result of observing the first individual to attempt the simulation. The third individual in the group also learned as a result of observing the first individual to attempt the simulation. However in this research, there was no statistically significant difference for the third individual who attempted the simulation learning as a result of observing the second individual. The timing of the simulation and interaction were not significant in this research. Conclusion: Individuals learn together by working in small cooperative groups. Cooperative groups provide the opportunity to discuss and work though problems. Group members are accountable and they must actively participate in order for individual and group success. Learning together has implications for all health care providers, faculty and students. Using simulated environments along with learning together is applicable to many areas of healthcare. Simulated environments provide safe experiences for student nurses who are currently losing clinical sites and it could be beneficial for teams of providers while practicing emergency procedures. Using simulated environments could also be useful for providing opportunities for inter-professional collaboration and research. Future research would include replication or working with cooperative groups while using other types of simulators or technology.en
dc.subjectCooperative Learningen
dc.subjectHaptic IV Simulatorsen
dc.subjectNursing Studenten
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:56:17Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:56:17Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.