2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601817
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
QSEN and Magnet': Incorporating System Thinking for Quality Care
Other Titles:
Impacts of Magnet Designation [Session]
Author(s):
Merriweather, Jeanette
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Omicron
Author Details:
Jeanette Merriweather, RN, CNE, CNN, jmerriw2@gru.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Patient care errors with dire consequences have continued to threaten the health and safety of patients and erode trust among the public in our health care systems.' Recent studies have confirmed that the number and the percentage of preventable adverse patient events in United States (US) hospitals has been grossly underestimated (Sitterding, 2011).' One attempt to improve the safety and quality in the hospital setting has been the pursuit of Magnet ' status.' The Magnet ' framework for nursing excellence provides insight about essential roles needed to support a culture of patient safety in the hospital setting.' It could be argued that Magnet ' recognition is a marker of pre-existing quality pursued by hospitals before the recognition was obtained, however, research supports lower odds of mortality and lower odds of failure to rescue in Magnet ' facilities (McHugh, et al., 2013).' Although the number of Magnet ' recognized hospitals have grown (now 8% of hospitals nationally), only a slight improvement in patient safety and quality outcomes have been reported (Brady, 2011).' Despite small gains in quality and safety indicators, nosocomial infections, falls, pressure ulcers, and many other preventable incidents continue to plague our healthcare systems.' 'Safety and quality issues identified in US healthcare system have triggered a mandate to transform nursing education into a new model that prepares graduates for interdisciplinary collaboration and system thinking to promote patient safety (Brady, 2011).' Responding to this call, the quality and safety education for nurses (QSEN) initiative was developed to integrate quality and safety competences into nursing education (Brady, 2011).' The relationship between nursing excellence and a culture of patient safety is well illustrated through the combining of QSEN with a Magnet ' environment.' QSEN competencies are patient centered care, teamwork, collaboration, evidence based practice, safety, quality improvement and informatics (Dolansky & Moore, 2013).' The Magnet ' model includes transformational leadership, structural empowerment, exemplary professional practice, new knowledge, innovations and improvements, and empirical outcomes (ANCC, 2013).' Integrating system thinking into the QSEN and Magnet ' environment offers promise for developing a culture that fosters patient safety.' Dolansky and Moore (2013) suggest that system thinking is vital to heighten awareness of the interdependencies needed to provide safety and quality care. They further indicate that events occur as part of a chain in the system, rather than isolated occurrences.' 'Most systems have deep layers of complexity in which patient care is delivered requiring nurses to recognize patterns and processes that are barriers to patient safety. How nurses view themselves and the quality of their work is informed by the systems in which they provide care. 'Nursing excellence must include the ability to understand systems and apply system thinking skills to create an environment that ensure patient safety.
Keywords:
System thinking; Magnet Status; QSEN
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15F08
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleQSEN and Magnet': Incorporating System Thinking for Quality Careen
dc.title.alternativeImpacts of Magnet Designation [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorMerriweather, Jeanetteen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Omicronen
dc.author.detailsJeanette Merriweather, RN, CNE, CNN, jmerriw2@gru.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601817-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Patient care errors with dire consequences have continued to threaten the health and safety of patients and erode trust among the public in our health care systems.' Recent studies have confirmed that the number and the percentage of preventable adverse patient events in United States (US) hospitals has been grossly underestimated (Sitterding, 2011).' One attempt to improve the safety and quality in the hospital setting has been the pursuit of Magnet ' status.' The Magnet ' framework for nursing excellence provides insight about essential roles needed to support a culture of patient safety in the hospital setting.' It could be argued that Magnet ' recognition is a marker of pre-existing quality pursued by hospitals before the recognition was obtained, however, research supports lower odds of mortality and lower odds of failure to rescue in Magnet ' facilities (McHugh, et al., 2013).' Although the number of Magnet ' recognized hospitals have grown (now 8% of hospitals nationally), only a slight improvement in patient safety and quality outcomes have been reported (Brady, 2011).' Despite small gains in quality and safety indicators, nosocomial infections, falls, pressure ulcers, and many other preventable incidents continue to plague our healthcare systems.' 'Safety and quality issues identified in US healthcare system have triggered a mandate to transform nursing education into a new model that prepares graduates for interdisciplinary collaboration and system thinking to promote patient safety (Brady, 2011).' Responding to this call, the quality and safety education for nurses (QSEN) initiative was developed to integrate quality and safety competences into nursing education (Brady, 2011).' The relationship between nursing excellence and a culture of patient safety is well illustrated through the combining of QSEN with a Magnet ' environment.' QSEN competencies are patient centered care, teamwork, collaboration, evidence based practice, safety, quality improvement and informatics (Dolansky & Moore, 2013).' The Magnet ' model includes transformational leadership, structural empowerment, exemplary professional practice, new knowledge, innovations and improvements, and empirical outcomes (ANCC, 2013).' Integrating system thinking into the QSEN and Magnet ' environment offers promise for developing a culture that fosters patient safety.' Dolansky and Moore (2013) suggest that system thinking is vital to heighten awareness of the interdependencies needed to provide safety and quality care. They further indicate that events occur as part of a chain in the system, rather than isolated occurrences.' 'Most systems have deep layers of complexity in which patient care is delivered requiring nurses to recognize patterns and processes that are barriers to patient safety. How nurses view themselves and the quality of their work is informed by the systems in which they provide care. 'Nursing excellence must include the ability to understand systems and apply system thinking skills to create an environment that ensure patient safety.en
dc.subjectSystem thinkingen
dc.subjectMagnet Statusen
dc.subjectQSENen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:56:18Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:56:18Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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