Mentoring Future Nurse Leaders: Collaboration between a Sigma Theta Tau Chapter and a Nursing Student Association

9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601832
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mentoring Future Nurse Leaders: Collaboration between a Sigma Theta Tau Chapter and a Nursing Student Association
Other Titles:
Mentoring Nursing Students [Session]
Author(s):
Hershorin, Indra; Schwal, Lauren; Olea, Jevon; Shaw, Mureen; McGregor, Debbie; Marshall, Jacquie; McCarthy, Lolita; Chin, Claudette
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Chi
Author Details:
Indra Hershorin, RN, CNE, ihershorin@barry.edu; Lauren Schwal, RN; Jevon Olea, RN; Mureen Shaw, RN; Debbie McGregor, RN, RNC; Jacquie Marshall, CNE; Lolita McCarthy, RN; Claudette Chin, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Mentoring is increasingly being used in nursing and by nursing organizations with the aim of contributing to personal, professional and leadership development. Shea (1999) describes mentoring as a developmental, caring, sharing, and helping relationship where one person invests time, know-how, and effort in enhancing another person's growth, knowledge and skills. Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) supports and advocates for mentoring as a key component of professional and leadership development. Mentoring programs not only make a difference in the health and vitality of an organization but benefits all parties involved; mentor, mentee, the organization and the nursing profession as a whole (http://www.nursingsociety.org). A review of the states of the science with regards to leadership suggests that one method for achieving transformational change in nursing is early, active, and dynamic mentoring. According to Fielden, Davidson, and Sutherland (2009) to be an effective influence in shaping American healthcare delivery systems, policy, and practice in the future it is crucial to prepare all nurses competently for leadership. In light of the empirical evidences on mentoring and leadership the Lambda Chi Chapter embarked on a mentoring program with the Barry University Nursing Student Association (NSA) aimed at developing future nurse leaders who will benefit the organization and the nursing profession. A mentoring program committee was established, a needs assessment completed and a framework for the mentoring program was designed. The ten Lambda Chi Board members were matched with the NSA executive board members. The pairing in most instances was of like or similar positions on the respective organizations executive boards. Two formal group meetings were held, one in the Fall semester and one in the Spring semester. The first meeting was designed as a 'meet-and-greet' session for the mentors and mentees. At this meeting the mentors and mentees established further meetings that were face-to-face, e-mail or telephone communication and a minimum of at least two times a month. A second formal group meeting was held at the end of the Spring semester. In addition, mentees were invited to participate in several Lambda Chi events and programs including the annual research conference. To determine effectiveness of the mentoring program a seven-item questionnaire was developed and mentees were asked to complete the survey. Ten surveys were distributed and nine were returned. Results of the questionnaire surveys were unanimously positive. Feedback from the mentees suggests that there was evidence of personal growth, increased satisfaction, support, encouragement, connectedness, and professional and leadership development. Mentoring serves as an important catalyst in the development of future leaders. The Lambda Chi Chapter mentoring program with the Barry University Nursing Students Association is designed to provide a purposeful, powerful, and positive impact on novice leadership development. The integration of mentoring through collaboration with the NSA fosters optimal learning, caring, communication, and development of leadership skills that consequently advance the quality of the nursing profession.
Keywords:
Mentoring; Leadership; Collaboration
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15G10
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMentoring Future Nurse Leaders: Collaboration between a Sigma Theta Tau Chapter and a Nursing Student Associationen
dc.title.alternativeMentoring Nursing Students [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorHershorin, Indraen
dc.contributor.authorSchwal, Laurenen
dc.contributor.authorOlea, Jevonen
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Mureenen
dc.contributor.authorMcGregor, Debbieen
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Jacquieen
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Lolitaen
dc.contributor.authorChin, Claudetteen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Chien
dc.author.detailsIndra Hershorin, RN, CNE, ihershorin@barry.edu; Lauren Schwal, RN; Jevon Olea, RN; Mureen Shaw, RN; Debbie McGregor, RN, RNC; Jacquie Marshall, CNE; Lolita McCarthy, RN; Claudette Chin, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601832-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Mentoring is increasingly being used in nursing and by nursing organizations with the aim of contributing to personal, professional and leadership development. Shea (1999) describes mentoring as a developmental, caring, sharing, and helping relationship where one person invests time, know-how, and effort in enhancing another person's growth, knowledge and skills. Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) supports and advocates for mentoring as a key component of professional and leadership development. Mentoring programs not only make a difference in the health and vitality of an organization but benefits all parties involved; mentor, mentee, the organization and the nursing profession as a whole (http://www.nursingsociety.org). A review of the states of the science with regards to leadership suggests that one method for achieving transformational change in nursing is early, active, and dynamic mentoring. According to Fielden, Davidson, and Sutherland (2009) to be an effective influence in shaping American healthcare delivery systems, policy, and practice in the future it is crucial to prepare all nurses competently for leadership. In light of the empirical evidences on mentoring and leadership the Lambda Chi Chapter embarked on a mentoring program with the Barry University Nursing Student Association (NSA) aimed at developing future nurse leaders who will benefit the organization and the nursing profession. A mentoring program committee was established, a needs assessment completed and a framework for the mentoring program was designed. The ten Lambda Chi Board members were matched with the NSA executive board members. The pairing in most instances was of like or similar positions on the respective organizations executive boards. Two formal group meetings were held, one in the Fall semester and one in the Spring semester. The first meeting was designed as a 'meet-and-greet' session for the mentors and mentees. At this meeting the mentors and mentees established further meetings that were face-to-face, e-mail or telephone communication and a minimum of at least two times a month. A second formal group meeting was held at the end of the Spring semester. In addition, mentees were invited to participate in several Lambda Chi events and programs including the annual research conference. To determine effectiveness of the mentoring program a seven-item questionnaire was developed and mentees were asked to complete the survey. Ten surveys were distributed and nine were returned. Results of the questionnaire surveys were unanimously positive. Feedback from the mentees suggests that there was evidence of personal growth, increased satisfaction, support, encouragement, connectedness, and professional and leadership development. Mentoring serves as an important catalyst in the development of future leaders. The Lambda Chi Chapter mentoring program with the Barry University Nursing Students Association is designed to provide a purposeful, powerful, and positive impact on novice leadership development. The integration of mentoring through collaboration with the NSA fosters optimal learning, caring, communication, and development of leadership skills that consequently advance the quality of the nursing profession.en
dc.subjectMentoringen
dc.subjectLeadershipen
dc.subjectCollaborationen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:56:43Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:56:43Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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