2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601833
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Tai Chi on Balance: A Population-Based Meta-Analysis
Other Titles:
Research Correlated to Clinical Outcomes [Session]
Author(s):
Song, Rhayun; Ahn, Sukhee; So, Heeyoung; Lee, Eun-hyun; Park, Moonkyung
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lamda-at-Large
Author Details:
Rhayun Song, RN, songry@cnu.ac.kr; Sukhee Ahn, RN, WHNP; Heeyoung So, RN; Eun-hyun Lee, RN; Moonkyung Park, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: The aim of this study was to systematically review and analyze the effects of Tai Chi on balance in older adults.Methods: The literature was searched for randomized clinical trials on the effects of Tai Chi on balance, as evaluated by direct, static, dynamic, and mixed measures. The effect sizes (ESs) on balance were calculated, using the standardized mean difference (d) and 95% CI.Results: Thirty-four studies were included. The overall ES of Tai Chi on static balance was medium at 3'months (ES=0.73) and small (ES=0.33) at 6'months for those with a low risk of falling. For those with a high risk of falling, the ES of Tai Chi on static balance was small (ES=0.47) at 3 months, but not significant at 6 months. When compared with no-exercise group, the ES of Tai Chi on static balance was medium (ES=0.66) at 3 months, but smaller (ES=0.37) at 6 months. The ES of Tai Chi (ES=0.31) was only significant at 6 months when compared with other exerciseConclusion: The findings of this meta-analysis suggest that those with a low risk of falling should practice Tai Chi for 3'months to improve their balance. The effects of Tai Chi on balance in those with a high risk of falling were small but significant at 3 months, supporting the safety and effectiveness of Tai Chi. It is also important to select reliable and sensitive measures for balance to examine the effects of Tai Chi especially.
Keywords:
meta analysis; tai chi; balance
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15M09
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEffects of Tai Chi on Balance: A Population-Based Meta-Analysisen
dc.title.alternativeResearch Correlated to Clinical Outcomes [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorSong, Rhayunen
dc.contributor.authorAhn, Sukheeen
dc.contributor.authorSo, Heeyoungen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Eun-hyunen
dc.contributor.authorPark, Moonkyungen
dc.contributor.departmentLamda-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsRhayun Song, RN, songry@cnu.ac.kr; Sukhee Ahn, RN, WHNP; Heeyoung So, RN; Eun-hyun Lee, RN; Moonkyung Park, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601833-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: The aim of this study was to systematically review and analyze the effects of Tai Chi on balance in older adults.Methods: The literature was searched for randomized clinical trials on the effects of Tai Chi on balance, as evaluated by direct, static, dynamic, and mixed measures. The effect sizes (ESs) on balance were calculated, using the standardized mean difference (d) and 95% CI.Results: Thirty-four studies were included. The overall ES of Tai Chi on static balance was medium at 3'months (ES=0.73) and small (ES=0.33) at 6'months for those with a low risk of falling. For those with a high risk of falling, the ES of Tai Chi on static balance was small (ES=0.47) at 3 months, but not significant at 6 months. When compared with no-exercise group, the ES of Tai Chi on static balance was medium (ES=0.66) at 3 months, but smaller (ES=0.37) at 6 months. The ES of Tai Chi (ES=0.31) was only significant at 6 months when compared with other exerciseConclusion: The findings of this meta-analysis suggest that those with a low risk of falling should practice Tai Chi for 3'months to improve their balance. The effects of Tai Chi on balance in those with a high risk of falling were small but significant at 3 months, supporting the safety and effectiveness of Tai Chi. It is also important to select reliable and sensitive measures for balance to examine the effects of Tai Chi especially.en
dc.subjectmeta analysisen
dc.subjecttai chien
dc.subjectbalanceen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:56:44Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:56:44Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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