Genomics and the Right to Health Autonomy: A Survey of International Health Policies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601841
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Genomics and the Right to Health Autonomy: A Survey of International Health Policies
Other Titles:
Applying Nursing Science and Policy to the Study of Genomics [Session]
Author(s):
Moore, Scott Emory
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Mu Rho
Author Details:
Scott Emory Moore, APRN, AGPCNP-BC, scottemorymoore@gmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: Nursing leadership in the international community spans many areas including health policy development. International health policies are varied in their subject matter and acceptance.' With the development of new technologies and methods of accessing and using genomic data, many international policies regarding genomic science and patient autonomy have been created.' Nurses must be aware of international policies and their impact on patient care.' Additionally nurses must take an interest in their roles as advocates for patients' rights to health. Methods: This review of current international genomic policies and documents incorporates thematic review as a method for understanding current thinking with regard to genomics and patient autonomy. Results: 'This review reveals the rich history of genomic policy starting with the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights.' The development of genomic health policies has been closely aligned with the policies regarding a patient's right to autonomy.' The underlying constructs of these key areas of policy are very similar and their close association is central to nursing's role in the future of genomics and international health policy. Conclusion: International health policy development regarding genomics has great influence on science and research of the future. As scientists and patient advocates nurses benefit from having an understanding of international health policy and the right to health. Better understanding of the themes of genomics and patient autonomy will help nurses in their roles as leaders in the development of future international health policies and patient advocacy.
Keywords:
International Health Policy; Genomics; Autonomy
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15C07
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleGenomics and the Right to Health Autonomy: A Survey of International Health Policiesen
dc.title.alternativeApplying Nursing Science and Policy to the Study of Genomics [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Scott Emoryen
dc.contributor.departmentMu Rhoen
dc.author.detailsScott Emory Moore, APRN, AGPCNP-BC, scottemorymoore@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601841-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: Nursing leadership in the international community spans many areas including health policy development. International health policies are varied in their subject matter and acceptance.' With the development of new technologies and methods of accessing and using genomic data, many international policies regarding genomic science and patient autonomy have been created.' Nurses must be aware of international policies and their impact on patient care.' Additionally nurses must take an interest in their roles as advocates for patients' rights to health. Methods: This review of current international genomic policies and documents incorporates thematic review as a method for understanding current thinking with regard to genomics and patient autonomy. Results: 'This review reveals the rich history of genomic policy starting with the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights.' The development of genomic health policies has been closely aligned with the policies regarding a patient's right to autonomy.' The underlying constructs of these key areas of policy are very similar and their close association is central to nursing's role in the future of genomics and international health policy. Conclusion: International health policy development regarding genomics has great influence on science and research of the future. As scientists and patient advocates nurses benefit from having an understanding of international health policy and the right to health. Better understanding of the themes of genomics and patient autonomy will help nurses in their roles as leaders in the development of future international health policies and patient advocacy.en
dc.subjectInternational Health Policyen
dc.subjectGenomicsen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:56:58Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:56:58Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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