The Navegantes para la Salud Primary Care Access and Navigation Intervention: Role Conceptualization, Implementation, and Assessment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601844
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Navegantes para la Salud Primary Care Access and Navigation Intervention: Role Conceptualization, Implementation, and Assessment
Other Titles:
Health Practices among Different Cultures [Session]
Author(s):
Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K.; Fore, M. Elizabeth
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Xi
Author Details:
DeAnne K. Hilfinger Messias, RN, FAAN, deanne.messias@sc.edu; M. Elizabeth Fore
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Timely and appropriate access to primary care is essential to both the maintenance and improvement of population health. In the United States, federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) provide primary care services for underserved communities, which includes Hispanics with limited-English-proficiency. Community health workers, known as promotores de salud in Spanish, are recognized as an essential link between underserved communities and the formal healthcare system. 'In nursing, the navigator role often refers to individualized assistance provided to patients with a specific health condition or in a specialized setting. Building on and combining aspects of both the community health worker and nurse navigator roles, we designed a Navegante para Salud (Health Navigator) intervention that combined elements of community outreach, community engagement, patient education, and navigational support, with the aim of improving access to and appropriate, timely utilization of community health clinics among Hispanic women and children in rural and urban settings in the state of South Carolina. Methods: We recruited and selected three bilingual Hispanic women from the local community who participated in an on-site, hands-on training program for 3 months; subsequently they implemented the Navegante intervention over a period of 12 months. Initially we did identify divergent role expectations among both staff and patients, including the expectation that Navegantes serve as on-site language interpreters for clinic encounters, despite having held'informational sessions with clinic staff prior to the initiation of the'Navegante'intervention. Over'the course of the intervention, the Navegantes refined and expanded their roles as they gained experience in navigating multiple systems,'developed working relationships with clinic staff, and formed relations and networks with other health and social services providers beyond the primary care setting. ' Results: To assess the impact of the Navegante'intervention'on access and utilization of FQHC clinics among Hispanic women and children, at the completion of the 12-month intervention we examined healthcare access and utilization data for the pregnant women and their dependents who had received navigational support; we then compared these data with a similar group Hispanic patients who had been seen at the same FQHC clinics during the previous year. Conclusion: This model of culturally and linguistically appropriate health systems navigational support that incorporates key aspects of the community health worker and nurse navigator roles is an approach that could be applied with other populations and settings around the globe.
Keywords:
community health workers/promotores de salud; primary care access; health systems navigation
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15E09
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Navegantes para la Salud Primary Care Access and Navigation Intervention: Role Conceptualization, Implementation, and Assessmenten
dc.title.alternativeHealth Practices among Different Cultures [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorHilfinger Messias, DeAnne K.en
dc.contributor.authorFore, M. Elizabethen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Xien
dc.author.detailsDeAnne K. Hilfinger Messias, RN, FAAN, deanne.messias@sc.edu; M. Elizabeth Foreen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601844-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Timely and appropriate access to primary care is essential to both the maintenance and improvement of population health. In the United States, federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) provide primary care services for underserved communities, which includes Hispanics with limited-English-proficiency. Community health workers, known as promotores de salud in Spanish, are recognized as an essential link between underserved communities and the formal healthcare system. 'In nursing, the navigator role often refers to individualized assistance provided to patients with a specific health condition or in a specialized setting. Building on and combining aspects of both the community health worker and nurse navigator roles, we designed a Navegante para Salud (Health Navigator) intervention that combined elements of community outreach, community engagement, patient education, and navigational support, with the aim of improving access to and appropriate, timely utilization of community health clinics among Hispanic women and children in rural and urban settings in the state of South Carolina. Methods: We recruited and selected three bilingual Hispanic women from the local community who participated in an on-site, hands-on training program for 3 months; subsequently they implemented the Navegante intervention over a period of 12 months. Initially we did identify divergent role expectations among both staff and patients, including the expectation that Navegantes serve as on-site language interpreters for clinic encounters, despite having held'informational sessions with clinic staff prior to the initiation of the'Navegante'intervention. Over'the course of the intervention, the Navegantes refined and expanded their roles as they gained experience in navigating multiple systems,'developed working relationships with clinic staff, and formed relations and networks with other health and social services providers beyond the primary care setting. ' Results: To assess the impact of the Navegante'intervention'on access and utilization of FQHC clinics among Hispanic women and children, at the completion of the 12-month intervention we examined healthcare access and utilization data for the pregnant women and their dependents who had received navigational support; we then compared these data with a similar group Hispanic patients who had been seen at the same FQHC clinics during the previous year. Conclusion: This model of culturally and linguistically appropriate health systems navigational support that incorporates key aspects of the community health worker and nurse navigator roles is an approach that could be applied with other populations and settings around the globe.en
dc.subjectcommunity health workers/promotores de saluden
dc.subjectprimary care accessen
dc.subjecthealth systems navigationen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:57:03Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:57:03Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.