Perception of U.S. Latino Adolescent Immigrants of Their Family and Community Environment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601848
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Perception of U.S. Latino Adolescent Immigrants of Their Family and Community Environment
Author(s):
Gannon, Brittany N.; Stacciarini, Jeanne-Marie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Brittany N. Gannon, RN, c1730025@ufl.edu; Jeanne-Marie Stacciarini, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Latinos are of the fastest growing minority populations in the U.S., with increasing trends of migration to rural communities. Latinos living in rural communities face specific challenges, such as isolation, poor mental health and limited access to health resources. Latino adolescents experience many psychosocial stressors and social isolation that negatively impact their mental wellbeing. The purpose of this study is to examine rural Latino adolescents' perception of their family and community environment and the relation to their overall wellbeing. Methods: This is an ongoing secondary qualitative analysis of a larger mixed-method study. Semi-structured interviews were performed with adolescents asking about their family and community environment relations. The sample consists of 56 adolescents, aged 11- 18 years, living in rural North Florida. NVivo software was used to thematically analyze English-written interviews. The Family Environment Scale (FES) dimensions (Cohesion, Expressiveness, Conflict, Independence, Achievement Orientation, Intellectual-Cultural Orientation, Active-Recreational Orientation, Moral-Religious Emphasis, Organization and Control) were used as a framework for the analysis. Simultaneously, free coding was performed to identify additional themes. ' Results: Results demonstrate a strong sense of Familismo in the adolescents' description of their family and community environment. Overall, Latino adolescents expressed a cohesive and expressive family environment, with minimal family conflict. Exceptions include lack of unguarded communication and lack of time spent with the family due to limited parental availability. Further, adolescents describe socioeconomic issues of social and geographic isolation, lack of community involvement, family economic stressors and familial pressure of achievement orientation. Overarching community barriers to acculturation for Latinos expressed by the adolescents were lack of English proficiency, fear of deportation of a family member, lack of economic resources, and lack of citizenship. Conclusion: Findings of this study are consistent with previous literature in regard to the prominent role of Familismo as a stressor and a form of mental health support and wellbeing. The FES scale is used in many studies to investigate family environments and as a guide for this analysis, the FES dimensions aided in the understanding of family and community environments. Yet, several socioeconomic themes that did not fit within this framework were identified in the free coding process. Thus, the FES may be limited in application to U.S. immigrants, because cultural aspects and rural immigration challenges are not included. Overall, this study demonstrates the need for further immigration studies addressing the mental health impact of immigration on adolescents and their families to rural U.S. communities.
Keywords:
Rural; Latino; Adolescent
CINAHL Headings:
Hispanics--In Adolescence; Rural Population
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST239
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titlePerception of U.S. Latino Adolescent Immigrants of Their Family and Community Environmenten
dc.contributor.authorGannon, Brittany N.en
dc.contributor.authorStacciarini, Jeanne-Marieen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsBrittany N. Gannon, RN, c1730025@ufl.edu; Jeanne-Marie Stacciarini, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601848-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Latinos are of the fastest growing minority populations in the U.S., with increasing trends of migration to rural communities. Latinos living in rural communities face specific challenges, such as isolation, poor mental health and limited access to health resources. Latino adolescents experience many psychosocial stressors and social isolation that negatively impact their mental wellbeing. The purpose of this study is to examine rural Latino adolescents' perception of their family and community environment and the relation to their overall wellbeing. Methods: This is an ongoing secondary qualitative analysis of a larger mixed-method study. Semi-structured interviews were performed with adolescents asking about their family and community environment relations. The sample consists of 56 adolescents, aged 11- 18 years, living in rural North Florida. NVivo software was used to thematically analyze English-written interviews. The Family Environment Scale (FES) dimensions (Cohesion, Expressiveness, Conflict, Independence, Achievement Orientation, Intellectual-Cultural Orientation, Active-Recreational Orientation, Moral-Religious Emphasis, Organization and Control) were used as a framework for the analysis. Simultaneously, free coding was performed to identify additional themes. ' Results: Results demonstrate a strong sense of Familismo in the adolescents' description of their family and community environment. Overall, Latino adolescents expressed a cohesive and expressive family environment, with minimal family conflict. Exceptions include lack of unguarded communication and lack of time spent with the family due to limited parental availability. Further, adolescents describe socioeconomic issues of social and geographic isolation, lack of community involvement, family economic stressors and familial pressure of achievement orientation. Overarching community barriers to acculturation for Latinos expressed by the adolescents were lack of English proficiency, fear of deportation of a family member, lack of economic resources, and lack of citizenship. Conclusion: Findings of this study are consistent with previous literature in regard to the prominent role of Familismo as a stressor and a form of mental health support and wellbeing. The FES scale is used in many studies to investigate family environments and as a guide for this analysis, the FES dimensions aided in the understanding of family and community environments. Yet, several socioeconomic themes that did not fit within this framework were identified in the free coding process. Thus, the FES may be limited in application to U.S. immigrants, because cultural aspects and rural immigration challenges are not included. Overall, this study demonstrates the need for further immigration studies addressing the mental health impact of immigration on adolescents and their families to rural U.S. communities.en
dc.subjectRuralen
dc.subjectLatinoen
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subject.cinahlHispanics--In Adolescenceen
dc.subject.cinahlRural Populationen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:57:10Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:57:10Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.