2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601900
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Best Practices in Using Secondary Analysis as a Method
Other Titles:
Using Technologies to Influence Care [Session]
Author(s):
Green, Katharine A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Zeta-at-Large
Author Details:
Katharine A. Green, APRN, CNM, MS, kgreen@nursing.umass.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Health care researchers frequently use secondary data analysis as an efficient and cost-effective method to study large populations or multiple data sets relating to individual subjects. There are many issues related to the use of secondary data analysis, including both benefits and areas that are of more concern. The emergence of multiple data streams and concerns about subject privacy are current issues in use of the method. While data sets may be readily accessible or relatively restricted, health care researchers should be aware of issues and implications before using secondary analysis as a research method in the "internet age". Methods: A literature review was conducted via three databases on the attributes of secondary data analysis and considerations in use of the method for health care research. Results: There are issues in the use of secondary analysis as a method specifically pertinent to the increasing use and power of computer data bases and the increasing use of social media that may jeopardize anonymity of subjects. Current methods of informed consent may be inadequate for the 'internet age'. Conclusions: Ready access to social media may increase the risks of subjects being identified when using secondary data analysis. Any informed consent offering anonymity to subjects may need revision, and amalgamation of de-identified data may be necessary to protect subject privacy in health care research.
Keywords:
secondary analysis; research method
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15G06
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleBest Practices in Using Secondary Analysis as a Methoden
dc.title.alternativeUsing Technologies to Influence Care [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Katharine A.en
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Zeta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsKatharine A. Green, APRN, CNM, MS, kgreen@nursing.umass.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601900-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Health care researchers frequently use secondary data analysis as an efficient and cost-effective method to study large populations or multiple data sets relating to individual subjects. There are many issues related to the use of secondary data analysis, including both benefits and areas that are of more concern. The emergence of multiple data streams and concerns about subject privacy are current issues in use of the method. While data sets may be readily accessible or relatively restricted, health care researchers should be aware of issues and implications before using secondary analysis as a research method in the "internet age". Methods: A literature review was conducted via three databases on the attributes of secondary data analysis and considerations in use of the method for health care research. Results: There are issues in the use of secondary analysis as a method specifically pertinent to the increasing use and power of computer data bases and the increasing use of social media that may jeopardize anonymity of subjects. Current methods of informed consent may be inadequate for the 'internet age'. Conclusions: Ready access to social media may increase the risks of subjects being identified when using secondary data analysis. Any informed consent offering anonymity to subjects may need revision, and amalgamation of de-identified data may be necessary to protect subject privacy in health care research.en
dc.subjectsecondary analysisen
dc.subjectresearch methoden
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:58:33Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:58:33Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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