Association of Breastfeeding with the Risk of Postpartum Depression: A Psychoneuroimmune Perspective

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601904
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Association of Breastfeeding with the Risk of Postpartum Depression: A Psychoneuroimmune Perspective
Other Titles:
Depression in Women: Research Regarding Mental Health Stressors and Status [Session]
Author(s):
Ahn, Sukhee; Corwin, Elizabeth
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Mu
Author Details:
Sukhee Ahn, RN, WHNP, sukheeahn@cnu.ac.kr; Elizabeth Corwin, RN, FNP
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine patterns of stress response, immune, and depressive symptoms, and explore the relationships among these variables in women predominantly breastfeeding or bottle feeding at 6 month postpartum. Methods: This is a part of a larger longitudinal study across 6 months postpartum investigating the psychoneuroimmunology of postpartum depression. One hundred nineteen postpartum women who met inclusion/exclusion criteria were'followed up from the prenatal period to postpartum 6 months. Data were collected during seven home visits occurring during the 3rd trimester (weeks 32-36) and on postpartum days 7 and 14, months 1, 2, 3, and 6. Women completed stress and depression surveys and provided blood for pro- (IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a, IFN-?) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines, and collected saliva for diurnal cortisol. Results: Self-report of predominant breastfeeding during 6 months postpartum ranged from 91.9% at day 7 to 70.6% at 6 months postpartum. There were no associations between the pattern of feeding and depressive symptoms. Biological differences, however, existed between the groups, with levels of salivary cortisol at 8 AM and 8:30 AM at month 6 higher and IL-6 lower in women who primarily breastfed compared to those who primarily bottle fed their infants after controlling for confounding variables. Conclusion: Breastfeeding was not related to postpartum depression, but differences in stress and inflammatory markers are apparent through 6 months postpartum.
Keywords:
inflammation; depression; breastfeeding
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15L08
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAssociation of Breastfeeding with the Risk of Postpartum Depression: A Psychoneuroimmune Perspectiveen
dc.title.alternativeDepression in Women: Research Regarding Mental Health Stressors and Status [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorAhn, Sukheeen
dc.contributor.authorCorwin, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Muen
dc.author.detailsSukhee Ahn, RN, WHNP, sukheeahn@cnu.ac.kr; Elizabeth Corwin, RN, FNPen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601904-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine patterns of stress response, immune, and depressive symptoms, and explore the relationships among these variables in women predominantly breastfeeding or bottle feeding at 6 month postpartum. Methods: This is a part of a larger longitudinal study across 6 months postpartum investigating the psychoneuroimmunology of postpartum depression. One hundred nineteen postpartum women who met inclusion/exclusion criteria were'followed up from the prenatal period to postpartum 6 months. Data were collected during seven home visits occurring during the 3rd trimester (weeks 32-36) and on postpartum days 7 and 14, months 1, 2, 3, and 6. Women completed stress and depression surveys and provided blood for pro- (IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a, IFN-?) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines, and collected saliva for diurnal cortisol. Results: Self-report of predominant breastfeeding during 6 months postpartum ranged from 91.9% at day 7 to 70.6% at 6 months postpartum. There were no associations between the pattern of feeding and depressive symptoms. Biological differences, however, existed between the groups, with levels of salivary cortisol at 8 AM and 8:30 AM at month 6 higher and IL-6 lower in women who primarily breastfed compared to those who primarily bottle fed their infants after controlling for confounding variables. Conclusion: Breastfeeding was not related to postpartum depression, but differences in stress and inflammatory markers are apparent through 6 months postpartum.en
dc.subjectinflammationen
dc.subjectdepressionen
dc.subjectbreastfeedingen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:58:40Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:58:40Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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