Developing and Implementing Policies for the HESI''Exit Exam: A Qualitative Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601920
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing and Implementing Policies for the HESI''Exit Exam: A Qualitative Study
Other Titles:
Qualitative Research in Nursing Education [Session]
Author(s):
Stonecypher, Karen; Willson, Pamela
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Beta
Author Details:
Karen Stonecypher, RN, karen.stonecypher@va.gov; Pamela Willson, APRN, FNP-BC, CNE, FAANP
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: This phenomenological study will describe practices used by Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) and Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs to create and implement policies and remediation practices regarding the use of the Elsevier HESI' Exit Examination (E2). Methods: Purposive and snowball sampling was used to recruit a specific population of educators. Elsevier provided a database of over 600 nursing programs that used the E2from 9/1/2009 to 8/31/2010 for initial recruitment. Snowball sampling was used to recruit additional participants from ADN and BSN programs. The final sample was comprised of 15 deans, program directors, and faculty from nine different states.'' Results: Policies are living documents that evolve and change over time. NCLEX-RN' scores were the primary reason that schools made changes to their exit exam policy. This study found that the E2 is not a graduation criterion at 87% (n=13) of the schools. A benchmark of 850 was set for success at 66% (n=10) of the schools. All of the schools in this study used some form of remediation. Giving value to the E2 Exit Exam was essential to most of the study schools. Both students and faculty were found to be accepting to the changes applied as new polices were written and student E2 Exit Exam success increased. Conclusion: Policy changes are in a constant state of evolution. A negative trigger initiates a need, forcing a change that stimulates improvements. In most instances faculty are responsible for planning the policy change unless another policy making body hands down a decision regarding what a new policy.' Following a policy change, there may be resistance on the part of students and faculty that eventually resolves into acceptance of the new policy. The status quo then remains in place until the next negative trigger occurs, beginning the process all over.
Keywords:
Standardized Testing; Exit examination; Testing policy
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15D10
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleDeveloping and Implementing Policies for the HESI''Exit Exam: A Qualitative Studyen
dc.title.alternativeQualitative Research in Nursing Education [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorStonecypher, Karenen
dc.contributor.authorWillson, Pamelaen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Betaen
dc.author.detailsKaren Stonecypher, RN, karen.stonecypher@va.gov; Pamela Willson, APRN, FNP-BC, CNE, FAANPen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601920-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: This phenomenological study will describe practices used by Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) and Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs to create and implement policies and remediation practices regarding the use of the Elsevier HESI' Exit Examination (E2). Methods: Purposive and snowball sampling was used to recruit a specific population of educators. Elsevier provided a database of over 600 nursing programs that used the E2from 9/1/2009 to 8/31/2010 for initial recruitment. Snowball sampling was used to recruit additional participants from ADN and BSN programs. The final sample was comprised of 15 deans, program directors, and faculty from nine different states.'' Results: Policies are living documents that evolve and change over time. NCLEX-RN' scores were the primary reason that schools made changes to their exit exam policy. This study found that the E2 is not a graduation criterion at 87% (n=13) of the schools. A benchmark of 850 was set for success at 66% (n=10) of the schools. All of the schools in this study used some form of remediation. Giving value to the E2 Exit Exam was essential to most of the study schools. Both students and faculty were found to be accepting to the changes applied as new polices were written and student E2 Exit Exam success increased. Conclusion: Policy changes are in a constant state of evolution. A negative trigger initiates a need, forcing a change that stimulates improvements. In most instances faculty are responsible for planning the policy change unless another policy making body hands down a decision regarding what a new policy.' Following a policy change, there may be resistance on the part of students and faculty that eventually resolves into acceptance of the new policy. The status quo then remains in place until the next negative trigger occurs, beginning the process all over.en
dc.subjectStandardized Testingen
dc.subjectExit examinationen
dc.subjectTesting policyen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:59:05Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:59:05Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.