Chronic Stress, a Cardiovascular Risk Factor, Linked to Societal Integration in Teenage Immigrants of African Descent

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601921
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Chronic Stress, a Cardiovascular Risk Factor, Linked to Societal Integration in Teenage Immigrants of African Descent
Other Titles:
Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease [Session]
Author(s):
Zlotnick, Cheryl; Goldblatt, Hadass; Birenbaum-Carmeli, Daphna; Shadmi, Efrat; Taychaw, Omer
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Gamma
Author Details:
Cheryl Zlotnick, RN, czlotnick@univ.haifa.ac.il; Hadass Goldblatt; Daphna Birenbaum-Carmeli; Efrat Shadmi, RN; Omer Taychaw
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: This study examines the nature of disparities in cardiovascular risk by exploring the impact that chronic stressors and other cardiovascular risk factors have on the integration of youth of African descent into an industrialized society.' New immigrants must learn the ways and culture of the new society before they can fully integrate into its fabric (i.e., cultural acquisition).'' Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Methods: Qualitative data on cardiovascular risk and acclimation to the dominant society were collected from three groups of key informants: (1) community leaders; (2) youth; and (3) a community advisory group. Results: Youth of Ethiopian descent from immigrant families engaged in the same western diets, computerized social networking, and habits in smoking and alcohol as did youth from the dominant society. However, informants of Ethiopian descent encountered and witnessed racism, institutional discrimination and evidence of devaluing Ethiopian culture, influencing the ability of youth from immigrant families to integrate into the society. Some youth were isolated.' Often they had no friends outside the community.' They referred to themselves as Ethiopian and the other youth as Israelis.' One youth said, "I don't know many Ethiopians [youth] who have really good Israeli friends."' Another youth described being held back and having to work more than youth who were not from families of Ethiopian descent was evident, "Every time [a youth of Ethiopian descent] makes headway, always there is the stage that he gets grabbed and slapped, and grabbed and slapped, and then again has to return home."Conclusion: In addition to the cardiovascular risks posed by fast food diets and a more sedentary life style (which youth adopted from the dominant society), youth of Ethiopian descent experienced chronic stress from pervasive discrimination, and the struggle to adjust to societal expectations.' Such factors not only compounded the cardiovascular risk of youth from immigrant families, but also pushed them away from mainstream society and towards societal marginalization.
Keywords:
immigrants; chronic stress; cardiovascular risk factors
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15M14
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleChronic Stress, a Cardiovascular Risk Factor, Linked to Societal Integration in Teenage Immigrants of African Descenten
dc.title.alternativeRisk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorZlotnick, Cherylen
dc.contributor.authorGoldblatt, Hadassen
dc.contributor.authorBirenbaum-Carmeli, Daphnaen
dc.contributor.authorShadmi, Efraten
dc.contributor.authorTaychaw, Omeren
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Gammaen
dc.author.detailsCheryl Zlotnick, RN, czlotnick@univ.haifa.ac.il; Hadass Goldblatt; Daphna Birenbaum-Carmeli; Efrat Shadmi, RN; Omer Taychawen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601921-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: This study examines the nature of disparities in cardiovascular risk by exploring the impact that chronic stressors and other cardiovascular risk factors have on the integration of youth of African descent into an industrialized society.' New immigrants must learn the ways and culture of the new society before they can fully integrate into its fabric (i.e., cultural acquisition).'' Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Methods: Qualitative data on cardiovascular risk and acclimation to the dominant society were collected from three groups of key informants: (1) community leaders; (2) youth; and (3) a community advisory group. Results: Youth of Ethiopian descent from immigrant families engaged in the same western diets, computerized social networking, and habits in smoking and alcohol as did youth from the dominant society. However, informants of Ethiopian descent encountered and witnessed racism, institutional discrimination and evidence of devaluing Ethiopian culture, influencing the ability of youth from immigrant families to integrate into the society. Some youth were isolated.' Often they had no friends outside the community.' They referred to themselves as Ethiopian and the other youth as Israelis.' One youth said, "I don't know many Ethiopians [youth] who have really good Israeli friends."' Another youth described being held back and having to work more than youth who were not from families of Ethiopian descent was evident, "Every time [a youth of Ethiopian descent] makes headway, always there is the stage that he gets grabbed and slapped, and grabbed and slapped, and then again has to return home."Conclusion: In addition to the cardiovascular risks posed by fast food diets and a more sedentary life style (which youth adopted from the dominant society), youth of Ethiopian descent experienced chronic stress from pervasive discrimination, and the struggle to adjust to societal expectations.' Such factors not only compounded the cardiovascular risk of youth from immigrant families, but also pushed them away from mainstream society and towards societal marginalization.en
dc.subjectimmigrantsen
dc.subjectchronic stressen
dc.subjectcardiovascular risk factorsen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:59:07Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:59:07Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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