2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601929
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reducing Telemetry Alarm Fatigue
Other Titles:
Alarm Fatigue and Its Issues [Session]
Author(s):
Srinivasa, Ekta
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta-at-Large
Author Details:
Ekta Srinivasa, RN, Ekta.Srinivasa@va.gov
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Abstract In the recent years, the importance of reducing alarm fatigue in a clinical environment has taken precedence nationally. Alarm management is one of the Joint Commission's National Patient Safety Goals (2014) because sentinel events have directly been linked to the devices that are generating these alarms. At an acute care facility in Boston, a multi-disciplinary team was formed to conduct a pilot study on the state of telemetry alarms on a surgical floor. The goal of this pilot project was to facilitate an environment of care where nurses are tuned to cardiac telemetry alarms that are clinically significant so more efficient patient care may be provided for truly actionable events. An evidence-based approach was taken utilizing alarms tracking software to capture all telemetry alarms during a twenty-five day time span. Likewise noise meters were placed near telemetry alarm speakers to track decibel levels during the aforementioned timeframe. Analysis of the data showed that clinically insignificant PVC alarms accounted for forty percent of all alarms in the unit within the time span, while also contributing to an average noise level of 57.84 dB in one of the selected areas. In response to the data, the interdisciplinary team approved to permanently default the settings for PAIR PVC, MULTIFORM PVC, and RUN PVC alarms to off. Alarm and noise data were subsequently tracked for an additional 25 days. The results showed a 54% decrease in the rate of alarms per bed per day, and an overall noise reduction of 1.5 dB.
Keywords:
Telemetry alarms; Alarm fatigue; Alarm desensitization
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15G13
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleReducing Telemetry Alarm Fatigueen
dc.title.alternativeAlarm Fatigue and Its Issues [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorSrinivasa, Ektaen
dc.contributor.departmentTheta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsEkta Srinivasa, RN, Ekta.Srinivasa@va.goven
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601929-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Abstract In the recent years, the importance of reducing alarm fatigue in a clinical environment has taken precedence nationally. Alarm management is one of the Joint Commission's National Patient Safety Goals (2014) because sentinel events have directly been linked to the devices that are generating these alarms. At an acute care facility in Boston, a multi-disciplinary team was formed to conduct a pilot study on the state of telemetry alarms on a surgical floor. The goal of this pilot project was to facilitate an environment of care where nurses are tuned to cardiac telemetry alarms that are clinically significant so more efficient patient care may be provided for truly actionable events. An evidence-based approach was taken utilizing alarms tracking software to capture all telemetry alarms during a twenty-five day time span. Likewise noise meters were placed near telemetry alarm speakers to track decibel levels during the aforementioned timeframe. Analysis of the data showed that clinically insignificant PVC alarms accounted for forty percent of all alarms in the unit within the time span, while also contributing to an average noise level of 57.84 dB in one of the selected areas. In response to the data, the interdisciplinary team approved to permanently default the settings for PAIR PVC, MULTIFORM PVC, and RUN PVC alarms to off. Alarm and noise data were subsequently tracked for an additional 25 days. The results showed a 54% decrease in the rate of alarms per bed per day, and an overall noise reduction of 1.5 dB.en
dc.subjectTelemetry alarmsen
dc.subjectAlarm fatigueen
dc.subjectAlarm desensitizationen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:59:21Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:59:21Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.