2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601947
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Does Investing in Nurse Staffing Provide Dividends?
Other Titles:
Research Correlated to Clinical Outcomes [Session]
Author(s):
Twigg, Diane Esma; Duffield, Christine; Myers, Helen; Giles, Margaret J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Diane Esma Twigg, RN, RM, FACN, FACHSM, d.twigg@ecu.edu.au; Christine Duffield, RN, FACN, FAAN; Helen Myers, RN; Margaret J. Giles
Abstract:
Session presentd on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: Over a decade of research has established that better nurse skill mix and staffing levels are linked to positive patient outcomes in hospital settings. Hospital executives are more likely to support a richer skill mix or increased nurse staffing levels if these decisions can be shown to be cost effective. This paper will discuss the evidence in regard to the cost effectiveness of increasing nursing hours or skill mix to improve patient outcomes. It will highlight the evidence to date to guide nurse leaders in staffing decisions and make recommendations on future research directions. 'Methods: 'To determine if the evidence in regard to increasing nursing hours or providing a richer skill mix was cost effective, a systematic review on economic evaluations of nurse staffing and patient outcomes was conducted. The Cochrane Collaboration systematic review method incorporating economic evidence was used. The CINAHL, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, and PsychINFO databases were searched in 2013 (with no date limits) for published and unpublished studies in English. Papers with full economic evaluations were included where the costs of increasing nursing hours or changing the skill mix were reported along with patient outcomes. Results: The systematic review identified five cost effectiveness and four cost benefit analyses. No cost minimisation or cost utility studies were identified in the review. As the studies used a variety of methods to conceptualise and measure costs and patient outcomes, ''comparison of results were difficult. Due to the small number of studies identified in the search, the mixed results and the variability in the methods used the reviewers were unable to determine conclusively whether or not increases in nurse staffing levels or a richer skill mix is a cost effective intervention for improving patient outcomes. In contrast to the large body of literature that links nurse staffing and skill mix to high quality patient care there are only a small number of studies that have investigated the cost of changing staffing levels and skill mix. The evidence does not enable the identification of a nurse staffing level or a particular skill mix that gives better patient outcomes in the most cost effective way.' 'Conclusion: The evidence to date suggests that increasing nurse staffing and/or improving the skill mix has a beneficial effect on patient outcomes and from the societal perspective may be cost effective. However, increased staffing at a hospital level comes at a cost and payers are left to determine if this cost is acceptable. 'On the other hand, there is some evidence that changing the skill mix may be more cost effective than increasing nursing hours although this requires further investigation. Further high quality studies are required using a well-defined reference base case to provide sufficient evidence to support nurse staffing decision making by nurse leaders.
Keywords:
Economic evaluation; Nurse staffing; Patient outcomes
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15M09
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleDoes Investing in Nurse Staffing Provide Dividends?en
dc.title.alternativeResearch Correlated to Clinical Outcomes [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorTwigg, Diane Esmaen
dc.contributor.authorDuffield, Christineen
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Helenen
dc.contributor.authorGiles, Margaret J.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsDiane Esma Twigg, RN, RM, FACN, FACHSM, d.twigg@ecu.edu.au; Christine Duffield, RN, FACN, FAAN; Helen Myers, RN; Margaret J. Gilesen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601947-
dc.description.abstractSession presentd on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: Over a decade of research has established that better nurse skill mix and staffing levels are linked to positive patient outcomes in hospital settings. Hospital executives are more likely to support a richer skill mix or increased nurse staffing levels if these decisions can be shown to be cost effective. This paper will discuss the evidence in regard to the cost effectiveness of increasing nursing hours or skill mix to improve patient outcomes. It will highlight the evidence to date to guide nurse leaders in staffing decisions and make recommendations on future research directions. 'Methods: 'To determine if the evidence in regard to increasing nursing hours or providing a richer skill mix was cost effective, a systematic review on economic evaluations of nurse staffing and patient outcomes was conducted. The Cochrane Collaboration systematic review method incorporating economic evidence was used. The CINAHL, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, and PsychINFO databases were searched in 2013 (with no date limits) for published and unpublished studies in English. Papers with full economic evaluations were included where the costs of increasing nursing hours or changing the skill mix were reported along with patient outcomes. Results: The systematic review identified five cost effectiveness and four cost benefit analyses. No cost minimisation or cost utility studies were identified in the review. As the studies used a variety of methods to conceptualise and measure costs and patient outcomes, ''comparison of results were difficult. Due to the small number of studies identified in the search, the mixed results and the variability in the methods used the reviewers were unable to determine conclusively whether or not increases in nurse staffing levels or a richer skill mix is a cost effective intervention for improving patient outcomes. In contrast to the large body of literature that links nurse staffing and skill mix to high quality patient care there are only a small number of studies that have investigated the cost of changing staffing levels and skill mix. The evidence does not enable the identification of a nurse staffing level or a particular skill mix that gives better patient outcomes in the most cost effective way.' 'Conclusion: The evidence to date suggests that increasing nurse staffing and/or improving the skill mix has a beneficial effect on patient outcomes and from the societal perspective may be cost effective. However, increased staffing at a hospital level comes at a cost and payers are left to determine if this cost is acceptable. 'On the other hand, there is some evidence that changing the skill mix may be more cost effective than increasing nursing hours although this requires further investigation. Further high quality studies are required using a well-defined reference base case to provide sufficient evidence to support nurse staffing decision making by nurse leaders.en
dc.subjectEconomic evaluationen
dc.subjectNurse staffingen
dc.subjectPatient outcomesen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:59:49Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:59:49Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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