2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601961
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Cultural Humility: A Concept Analysis
Author(s):
Baptiste, Diana-Lyn; Foronda, Cynthia L.; Ousman, Kevin; Reinholdt, Maren M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Beta
Author Details:
Diana-Lyn Baptiste, RN, dbaptis1@jhu.edu; Cynthia L. Foronda, RN,'CNE; Kevin Ousman, RN; Maren M. Reinholdt, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Diversity is being increasingly recognized as an area of emphasis in health care. The term cultural humility is used frequently but society's understanding of the term is unclear. The aim of this paper was to provide a concept analysis and a current definition for the term cultural humility. To capture society's definition of the term, seven databases representing different disciplines were explored. Abstracts were read for relevance and sixty two articles from' were included in the review.''Rodgers and Knafl's (2000) method of concept analysis was used to guide the process. Cultural humility was used in a variety of contexts from individuals having ethnic and racial differences, to differences in sexual preference, social status, interprofessional roles, to healthcare provider/patient relationships. The attributes were openness, self-awareness, egoless, supportive interactions, and self-reflection and critique. The antecedents were diversity and power imbalance. The consequences were mutual empowerment, partnerships, respect, optimal care, and lifelong learning. Cultural humility was described as a lifelong process. With a firm understanding of the term, individuals and communities will be better equipped to understand and accomplish an inclusive environment with mutual benefit and optimal care.
Keywords:
cultural humility; concept analysis; nursing
MeSH:
Cultural Competency
CINAHL Headings:
Cultural Competence; Cultural Sensitivity; Nomenclature
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST201
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleCultural Humility: A Concept Analysisen
dc.contributor.authorBaptiste, Diana-Lynen
dc.contributor.authorForonda, Cynthia L.en
dc.contributor.authorOusman, Kevinen
dc.contributor.authorReinholdt, Maren M.en
dc.contributor.departmentNu Betaen
dc.author.detailsDiana-Lyn Baptiste, RN, dbaptis1@jhu.edu; Cynthia L. Foronda, RN,'CNE; Kevin Ousman, RN; Maren M. Reinholdt, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601961-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Diversity is being increasingly recognized as an area of emphasis in health care. The term cultural humility is used frequently but society's understanding of the term is unclear. The aim of this paper was to provide a concept analysis and a current definition for the term cultural humility. To capture society's definition of the term, seven databases representing different disciplines were explored. Abstracts were read for relevance and sixty two articles from' were included in the review.''Rodgers and Knafl's (2000) method of concept analysis was used to guide the process. Cultural humility was used in a variety of contexts from individuals having ethnic and racial differences, to differences in sexual preference, social status, interprofessional roles, to healthcare provider/patient relationships. The attributes were openness, self-awareness, egoless, supportive interactions, and self-reflection and critique. The antecedents were diversity and power imbalance. The consequences were mutual empowerment, partnerships, respect, optimal care, and lifelong learning. Cultural humility was described as a lifelong process. With a firm understanding of the term, individuals and communities will be better equipped to understand and accomplish an inclusive environment with mutual benefit and optimal care.en
dc.subjectcultural humilityen
dc.subjectconcept analysisen
dc.subjectnursingen
dc.subject.meshCultural Competencyen
dc.subject.cinahlCultural Competenceen
dc.subject.cinahlCultural Sensitivityen
dc.subject.cinahlNomenclatureen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:00:12Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:00:12Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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