An Evidence-Based Intervention to Improve Vaccination Rates for Seasonal Influenza among Registered Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601963
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Evidence-Based Intervention to Improve Vaccination Rates for Seasonal Influenza among Registered Nurses
Other Titles:
Implementing EBP to Promote Health and Prevent Disease [Session]
Author(s):
Maitre, Debra A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Kappa At-Large
Author Details:
Debra A. Maitre, APRN-CNS, RNC-OB, C-EFM, NEA-BC, debmaitre@gmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015. Abstract An Evidence Based Intervention to Improve Vaccination Rates for Seasonal Influenza Among Registered Nurses Date Created: July 2014 Creator: Maitre, Debra ??Abstract Seasonal influenza continues to cause the hospitalizations and deaths of tens of thousands every year in the U.S. (National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, 2008). Vaccination of healthcare workers for influenza has been recommended for more than 30 years (Willis & Wortley, 2007) and reports of transmission of influenza by Registered Nurses (RNs) to patients are well documented. In spite of these facts, RN vaccination rates remain below the recommended target of 90% (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2012). Evidence suggests that RNs who refuse influenza vaccination are less knowledgeable about influenza, the risks of the vaccine, side effects, and vaccine efficacy, than those who are vaccinated (Clark et al., 2009). Mandatory vaccination policies are becoming more common as efforts to improve rates voluntarily have failed. This project's purpose was to evaluate if an educational intervention on influenza and its risks, while addressing myths and misconceptions, would improve the rate of RN vaccination. The Health Belief Model's (Champion, 1984; Champion & Skinner, 2008; Glanz, Rimer, & Lewis, 2002) conceptual framework informed and guided the project. The primary objective was to dispel myths and misconceptions regarding influenza and vaccines, while improving knowledge of influenza's risks, vaccine efficacy, and safety. A secondary objective was to determine if demographic factors such as age, gender, race/ethnicity, and years of experience, were associated with RN vaccination status, so that more successful interventions might be developed. Over a two-week period, 12 presentations on influenza, its risks, and the safety and efficacy of vaccines, were provided at a large, urban medical center, employing 900+ RNs. A convenience sample of 57 RNs completed data information sheets reporting their vaccination status for the year prior to the intervention, which was then compared their vaccination status in the current influenza season, after attending the presentation. Non-parametric statistical tests were utilized to determine if vaccination rates improved following the intervention. Results suggest while vaccination rates increased slightly following intervention, the change in vaccination rate was not significant. However, notable associations were found with vaccination status and race/ethnicity, and age. In addition, previous vaccination status was strongly associated with recurrent vaccination status. Further study is recommended in order to determine what interventions would improve RN acceptance of vaccination, as the likelihood of mandatory healthcare worker vaccination policies increase. Keywords: Seasonal Influenza, Registered Nurses, Vaccination, Evidence-Based Intervention.
Keywords:
influenza; nurses; evidence-based intervention
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15E15
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAn Evidence-Based Intervention to Improve Vaccination Rates for Seasonal Influenza among Registered Nursesen
dc.title.alternativeImplementing EBP to Promote Health and Prevent Disease [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorMaitre, Debra A.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Kappa At-Largeen
dc.author.detailsDebra A. Maitre, APRN-CNS, RNC-OB, C-EFM, NEA-BC, debmaitre@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601963-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015. Abstract An Evidence Based Intervention to Improve Vaccination Rates for Seasonal Influenza Among Registered Nurses Date Created: July 2014 Creator: Maitre, Debra ??Abstract Seasonal influenza continues to cause the hospitalizations and deaths of tens of thousands every year in the U.S. (National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, 2008). Vaccination of healthcare workers for influenza has been recommended for more than 30 years (Willis & Wortley, 2007) and reports of transmission of influenza by Registered Nurses (RNs) to patients are well documented. In spite of these facts, RN vaccination rates remain below the recommended target of 90% (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2012). Evidence suggests that RNs who refuse influenza vaccination are less knowledgeable about influenza, the risks of the vaccine, side effects, and vaccine efficacy, than those who are vaccinated (Clark et al., 2009). Mandatory vaccination policies are becoming more common as efforts to improve rates voluntarily have failed. This project's purpose was to evaluate if an educational intervention on influenza and its risks, while addressing myths and misconceptions, would improve the rate of RN vaccination. The Health Belief Model's (Champion, 1984; Champion & Skinner, 2008; Glanz, Rimer, & Lewis, 2002) conceptual framework informed and guided the project. The primary objective was to dispel myths and misconceptions regarding influenza and vaccines, while improving knowledge of influenza's risks, vaccine efficacy, and safety. A secondary objective was to determine if demographic factors such as age, gender, race/ethnicity, and years of experience, were associated with RN vaccination status, so that more successful interventions might be developed. Over a two-week period, 12 presentations on influenza, its risks, and the safety and efficacy of vaccines, were provided at a large, urban medical center, employing 900+ RNs. A convenience sample of 57 RNs completed data information sheets reporting their vaccination status for the year prior to the intervention, which was then compared their vaccination status in the current influenza season, after attending the presentation. Non-parametric statistical tests were utilized to determine if vaccination rates improved following the intervention. Results suggest while vaccination rates increased slightly following intervention, the change in vaccination rate was not significant. However, notable associations were found with vaccination status and race/ethnicity, and age. In addition, previous vaccination status was strongly associated with recurrent vaccination status. Further study is recommended in order to determine what interventions would improve RN acceptance of vaccination, as the likelihood of mandatory healthcare worker vaccination policies increase. Keywords: Seasonal Influenza, Registered Nurses, Vaccination, Evidence-Based Intervention.en
dc.subjectinfluenzaen
dc.subjectnursesen
dc.subjectevidence-based interventionen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:00:15Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:00:15Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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