The Impact of Clinical Education in Rural Lesotho: Using Primary Health Care Clinical Placements to Enhance Students' Clinical Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601970
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Clinical Education in Rural Lesotho: Using Primary Health Care Clinical Placements to Enhance Students' Clinical Practice
Other Titles:
Impact of Clinical and Academic Preparation on Nursing Students [Session]
Author(s):
Phafoli, Semakaleng; Christensen Majid, E. Alice; Stender, Stacie C.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Semakaleng Phafoli, RN, semakaleng.phafoli@jhpiego.org; E. Alice Christensen Majid, RN, CNS; Stacie C. Stender, RN, FNP
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Primary health care is the main access point for health services in Lesotho; nurses and midwives provide the majority of care at this level. ??Educational assessments of the nursing and midwifery training programs highlighted gaps in clinical experiences and education of students.?? The USAID-funded Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program (MCHIP) initiated a nursing pre-service education (PSE) program in Lesotho in May 2010 to improve the quality of nurse- and midwife-delivered care. Given the priority of decentralized health care services and the geographic distribution of the people of Lesotho, there is a need to ensure that these nurses graduating from nursing education institutions are trained to manage the health care priorities within the district health system structure.?? MCHIP supported the development of primary health care (PHC) clinical placements for trained nursing assistants and general nursing and midwifery students. The placements were designed to match smaller cohorts of students with preceptors to encourage better teaching/learning opportunities and appropriate oversight.?? To expand on its anecdotal program evaluation, MCHIP conducted operational research on PHC clinical placements to provide evidence for the effectiveness of the clinical placements. The aim of the research was to determine whether clinical placements prepared students and their preceptors to address Lesotho???s health priorities. Methods: The study employed both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection. ??A total of 96 preceptors, eight nurse/midwifery educators, 40 clinicians, and 241 diploma students were recruited as research participants. Eight data collection tools, including skills checklists, observation of preceptors,?? questionnaires, and 7 focus group discussions were used to collect the data. Results: Students and preceptors both perceived PHC clinics to be appropriate settings to provide students with rich learning environments, allowing them to develop personally and professionally.?? While the quantitative data did not definitively conclude that the PHC experience directly increased the likelihood that students would accept placement in the PHC setting, the qualitative data supports this idea; students expressed their likelihood to accept deployment there post-graduation. Preceptors expressed that PHC clinical placements were valuable as they enforced them to keep up-to-date with new evidence based practices in nursing/midwifery and to demonstrate skills competently to students. For those preceptors who were trained, the placements enabled them to practice the facilitation skills they were trained on. A comparison between trained and non-trained preceptors was also conducted with both groups being?? observed and evaluated for their performance on 22 skills. Trained preceptors scored an average score of 85% while non-trained preceptors scores averaged 71%. The trained preceptors had a significantly higher total score (p < .005). In addition, results support the notion that PHC placements contributed to increasing all cadres??? confidence and competence in various clinical skills. Across all three cadres of students, there was improvement in the number of skills 80% of students deemed competent between baseline and endline. ??A majority of students (89%) reported they would work in a PHC setting after clinical placement.?? Conclusion: PHC placements impacted confidence and competence in HIV care skills among all three cadres of students. The results of this study support the hypothesis that PHC clinical placements contribute to increasing nurse and midwife confidence and competence, though the effect was greater for nursing students than for midwifery students. PHC clinical placements are suitable for acquisition of the needed competencies and confidence for students in Lesotho. Clinical education should include varied experiences to ensure students gain skills in all areas relative to deployment. Communication and supporting clinical sites including training preceptors is key to successful placements. Continuing to support schools in health center placements is vital to creating primary health care clinical learning opportunities for students. Activities that increase the competence of students in the primary health care environment and acceptability of deployment post-graduation to health center settings where most Basotho receive access to care are crucial to ensure a well-staffed and competent rural workforce.
Keywords:
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Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15I15
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Impact of Clinical Education in Rural Lesotho: Using Primary Health Care Clinical Placements to Enhance Students' Clinical Practiceen
dc.title.alternativeImpact of Clinical and Academic Preparation on Nursing Students [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorPhafoli, Semakalengen
dc.contributor.authorChristensen Majid, E. Aliceen
dc.contributor.authorStender, Stacie C.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsSemakaleng Phafoli, RN, semakaleng.phafoli@jhpiego.org; E. Alice Christensen Majid, RN, CNS; Stacie C. Stender, RN, FNPen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601970-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Primary health care is the main access point for health services in Lesotho; nurses and midwives provide the majority of care at this level. ??Educational assessments of the nursing and midwifery training programs highlighted gaps in clinical experiences and education of students.?? The USAID-funded Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program (MCHIP) initiated a nursing pre-service education (PSE) program in Lesotho in May 2010 to improve the quality of nurse- and midwife-delivered care. Given the priority of decentralized health care services and the geographic distribution of the people of Lesotho, there is a need to ensure that these nurses graduating from nursing education institutions are trained to manage the health care priorities within the district health system structure.?? MCHIP supported the development of primary health care (PHC) clinical placements for trained nursing assistants and general nursing and midwifery students. The placements were designed to match smaller cohorts of students with preceptors to encourage better teaching/learning opportunities and appropriate oversight.?? To expand on its anecdotal program evaluation, MCHIP conducted operational research on PHC clinical placements to provide evidence for the effectiveness of the clinical placements. The aim of the research was to determine whether clinical placements prepared students and their preceptors to address Lesotho???s health priorities. Methods: The study employed both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection. ??A total of 96 preceptors, eight nurse/midwifery educators, 40 clinicians, and 241 diploma students were recruited as research participants. Eight data collection tools, including skills checklists, observation of preceptors,?? questionnaires, and 7 focus group discussions were used to collect the data. Results: Students and preceptors both perceived PHC clinics to be appropriate settings to provide students with rich learning environments, allowing them to develop personally and professionally.?? While the quantitative data did not definitively conclude that the PHC experience directly increased the likelihood that students would accept placement in the PHC setting, the qualitative data supports this idea; students expressed their likelihood to accept deployment there post-graduation. Preceptors expressed that PHC clinical placements were valuable as they enforced them to keep up-to-date with new evidence based practices in nursing/midwifery and to demonstrate skills competently to students. For those preceptors who were trained, the placements enabled them to practice the facilitation skills they were trained on. A comparison between trained and non-trained preceptors was also conducted with both groups being?? observed and evaluated for their performance on 22 skills. Trained preceptors scored an average score of 85% while non-trained preceptors scores averaged 71%. The trained preceptors had a significantly higher total score (p < .005). In addition, results support the notion that PHC placements contributed to increasing all cadres??? confidence and competence in various clinical skills. Across all three cadres of students, there was improvement in the number of skills 80% of students deemed competent between baseline and endline. ??A majority of students (89%) reported they would work in a PHC setting after clinical placement.?? Conclusion: PHC placements impacted confidence and competence in HIV care skills among all three cadres of students. The results of this study support the hypothesis that PHC clinical placements contribute to increasing nurse and midwife confidence and competence, though the effect was greater for nursing students than for midwifery students. PHC clinical placements are suitable for acquisition of the needed competencies and confidence for students in Lesotho. Clinical education should include varied experiences to ensure students gain skills in all areas relative to deployment. Communication and supporting clinical sites including training preceptors is key to successful placements. Continuing to support schools in health center placements is vital to creating primary health care clinical learning opportunities for students. Activities that increase the competence of students in the primary health care environment and acceptability of deployment post-graduation to health center settings where most Basotho receive access to care are crucial to ensure a well-staffed and competent rural workforce.en
dc.subjectTYPE NEW KEYWORD HEREen
dc.subjectTYPE NEW KEYWORD HEREen
dc.subjectTYPE NEW KEYWORD HEREen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:00:26Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:00:26Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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