2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601983
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Dedicated Unit and Preceptor Model: An Innovation on Precepting
Author(s):
Ostendorf, Wendy; Painter, Jennifer
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Xi
Author Details:
Wendy Ostendorf, RN, CNE, ostendow@neumann.edu; Jennifer Painter, RN, OCN, AOCNS
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: The traditional model of clinical practice for nursing students has always been a 1 faculty to 8 student ratio on the nursing unit. In this model, the precepted experience is usually reserved for the final semester of the program. The purpose of this proposed study was to explore the outcomes of a dedicated unit and preceptor model on student and staff members' experiences in the clinical setting. Methods: The research design for this study was a qualitative, descriptive study. After consenting to participate, participants answered semi-structured questions posted on survey monkey. Participants did not have access to other participants' comments, and individual comments were not tracked for the purpose of identification or any other reason.' A demographic questionnaire followed the semi-structured questions, and on completion of the questionnaire, participants closed out of the study's web browser. Results: Data analysis was completed using a content analysis of the semi-structured questions, consistent with qualitative research, and was ongoing with the data collection.' All of the data are presented in aggregate form, and the respondent responses were analyzed for themes and patterns.' The common themes from the students who participated in the study represent the most meaningful outcomes identified by the researchers in the analysis of the data. The theme of 'increased competence and skills' was the one that emerged from the analysis most clearly. Students discussed the importance of obtaining these clinical skills that would be needed as they transitioned into the workforce after graduation. The students identified these needed skills as extensions of the skills set down in earlier program clinical experiences.' The second theme of 'enthusiasm' was clearly identified as a characteristic of the preceptor role by the student. Students found the preceptors to be supportive and helpful as a component of this identified theme of enthusiasm. Student found this model of offer a realistic clinical experience that immersed them in the professional nurse role. Students identified enthusiasm on the part of the preceptor as making them feel welcomed and free to ask questions. 'Teaching' was identified as the third theme that students felt was integral to this final clinical experience. Students believed that this skill on the part of the preceptor allowed the free exchange of information so that the student increased their sense of independence. Although students were expected to take a full clinical complement of four to five patients, they believed the ability to continue to be 'taught' was crucial to this transition in practice. A separate theme of 'feeling welcomed' was identified, with the students believing this was as integral to their clinical success and the preceptors knowledge and ability to teach. The students highlighted that when the preceptor created a welcoming environment the student was more open to asking questions and obtaining their needed answers.' Students identified this theme of welcoming as part of the interprofessional role they saw demonstrated by the preceptor and to all other healthcare workers. The common themes from the preceptors who participated in the study represent the most meaningful outcomes identified by the researchers in the analysis of the data. The theme of 'communication' was the one that emerged from the analysis most clearly. Preceptors discussed the importance of increased communication between the instructor, the student and the preceptor in this model. The preceptors identified the need for good communication as an essential component of clinical.' The second theme of 'consistency' was clearly identified as a characteristic of the experience as identified by the preceptor. 'Preceptors found having a consistent student and clinical day were beneficial in allowing them to provide students with a realistic experience on the unit. 'Relationship' was identified as the third theme that preceptors felt was integral to this final clinical experience. Preceptors felt that they were able to develop a relationship with the student which provided them both with a better experience and allowed the preceptor to be honest in their review of the student. Conclusion: These common themes are representative of the responses of all students and preceptors who participated in the study. The researchers felt that the first theme of increased competence and skills was a key finding that related to students ability to successfully transition to the professional nursing role. This theme represents support for a dedicated preceptor model in providing a consistent professional role model that offered a safe environment for students to manage multiple patients in a realistic clinical experience. This theme is significant as it provides support for a clinical experience that allows student immersion in a setting with a preceptor that offers the skills to successfully transition into the graduate nursing role.' The results suggest that this dedicated unit and preceptor model can meet the educational challenge with the support of the healthcare agencies. In light of the complex healthcare environment and lack of clinical experienced faculty members these models offer a unique opportunity to bridge the academic to practice gap and transition students to the professional nursing role.' This model may also serve as a successful strategy to increase retention rates for new graduate hires.
Keywords:
Dedicated Unit; Preceptors
MeSH:
Preceptorship
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST94
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleDedicated Unit and Preceptor Model: An Innovation on Preceptingen
dc.contributor.authorOstendorf, Wendyen
dc.contributor.authorPainter, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Xien
dc.author.detailsWendy Ostendorf, RN, CNE, ostendow@neumann.edu; Jennifer Painter, RN, OCN, AOCNSen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601983-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: The traditional model of clinical practice for nursing students has always been a 1 faculty to 8 student ratio on the nursing unit. In this model, the precepted experience is usually reserved for the final semester of the program. The purpose of this proposed study was to explore the outcomes of a dedicated unit and preceptor model on student and staff members' experiences in the clinical setting. Methods: The research design for this study was a qualitative, descriptive study. After consenting to participate, participants answered semi-structured questions posted on survey monkey. Participants did not have access to other participants' comments, and individual comments were not tracked for the purpose of identification or any other reason.' A demographic questionnaire followed the semi-structured questions, and on completion of the questionnaire, participants closed out of the study's web browser. Results: Data analysis was completed using a content analysis of the semi-structured questions, consistent with qualitative research, and was ongoing with the data collection.' All of the data are presented in aggregate form, and the respondent responses were analyzed for themes and patterns.' The common themes from the students who participated in the study represent the most meaningful outcomes identified by the researchers in the analysis of the data. The theme of 'increased competence and skills' was the one that emerged from the analysis most clearly. Students discussed the importance of obtaining these clinical skills that would be needed as they transitioned into the workforce after graduation. The students identified these needed skills as extensions of the skills set down in earlier program clinical experiences.' The second theme of 'enthusiasm' was clearly identified as a characteristic of the preceptor role by the student. Students found the preceptors to be supportive and helpful as a component of this identified theme of enthusiasm. Student found this model of offer a realistic clinical experience that immersed them in the professional nurse role. Students identified enthusiasm on the part of the preceptor as making them feel welcomed and free to ask questions. 'Teaching' was identified as the third theme that students felt was integral to this final clinical experience. Students believed that this skill on the part of the preceptor allowed the free exchange of information so that the student increased their sense of independence. Although students were expected to take a full clinical complement of four to five patients, they believed the ability to continue to be 'taught' was crucial to this transition in practice. A separate theme of 'feeling welcomed' was identified, with the students believing this was as integral to their clinical success and the preceptors knowledge and ability to teach. The students highlighted that when the preceptor created a welcoming environment the student was more open to asking questions and obtaining their needed answers.' Students identified this theme of welcoming as part of the interprofessional role they saw demonstrated by the preceptor and to all other healthcare workers. The common themes from the preceptors who participated in the study represent the most meaningful outcomes identified by the researchers in the analysis of the data. The theme of 'communication' was the one that emerged from the analysis most clearly. Preceptors discussed the importance of increased communication between the instructor, the student and the preceptor in this model. The preceptors identified the need for good communication as an essential component of clinical.' The second theme of 'consistency' was clearly identified as a characteristic of the experience as identified by the preceptor. 'Preceptors found having a consistent student and clinical day were beneficial in allowing them to provide students with a realistic experience on the unit. 'Relationship' was identified as the third theme that preceptors felt was integral to this final clinical experience. Preceptors felt that they were able to develop a relationship with the student which provided them both with a better experience and allowed the preceptor to be honest in their review of the student. Conclusion: These common themes are representative of the responses of all students and preceptors who participated in the study. The researchers felt that the first theme of increased competence and skills was a key finding that related to students ability to successfully transition to the professional nursing role. This theme represents support for a dedicated preceptor model in providing a consistent professional role model that offered a safe environment for students to manage multiple patients in a realistic clinical experience. This theme is significant as it provides support for a clinical experience that allows student immersion in a setting with a preceptor that offers the skills to successfully transition into the graduate nursing role.' The results suggest that this dedicated unit and preceptor model can meet the educational challenge with the support of the healthcare agencies. In light of the complex healthcare environment and lack of clinical experienced faculty members these models offer a unique opportunity to bridge the academic to practice gap and transition students to the professional nursing role.' This model may also serve as a successful strategy to increase retention rates for new graduate hires.en
dc.subjectDedicated Uniten
dc.subjectPreceptorsen
dc.subject.meshPreceptorshipen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:00:46Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:00:46Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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