2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601994
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Reliability Testing of a Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) System
Author(s):
Dunkle, Stephanie R.; Whitley, Erin; Roney, Jamie K.; Maples, Jessica; Long, JoAnn D.; Marchand, Staci; Hughes, Stacy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Stephanie R. Dunkle, RN, sdunkle@covhs.org; Erin Whitley, RN; Jamie K. Roney, RN-BC, CCRN-K; Jessica Maples, RN-BC; JoAnn D. Long, RN, NEA-BC; Staci Marchand, RN; Stacy Hughes, RN, OCN
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: Internationally there is a lack of consensus on what should be included in modified early warning scoring (MEWS) tools. Furthermore, few studies have reported reliability and validity testing of MEWS tools. Further, few studies have reported reliability and validity testing of MEWS tools.' The purpose of this study researchers sought to report reliability testing of the Covenant Health MEWS tool for use in an adult medical-surgical population. Background: Vital sign and assessment findings recording by nurses do not necessarily translate into rapid recognition of a patient's deteriorating condition. With signs of health condition declining evident hours before an adverse event occurrence, clinical MEWS tools quantify and rank physiological assessment findings triggering life-saving care. MEWS assessment tools can assist healthcare providers in the rapid detection and recognition of subtle changes in patient condition signaling clinical deterioration. Comprehensive literature review findings indicated the need for more rigorous testing and reporting of the reliability of MEWS tools in relationship to patient outcomes. 'The development of the MEWS instrument was initiated from shared governance committee responsible for patient safety. The MEWS tool was developed following a comprehensive literature review and a plan-do-check-act (PDCA) cycle process for improvement and preliminary testing of the tool.' The purpose of this study is to test reproducibility of the Covenant Health MEWS tool using a test-retest design. Methods:'A convenience sample of critical care nurses (n=32) from a nonprofit acute care facility (881 licensed beds) were recruited for reliability testing of the Covenant Health MEWS form. At time one, testing will be conducted in a simulation laboratory adjacent to the hospital using four low-fidelity mock hospital simulation scenarios developed from clinical data from hospitalized patients who died from sepsis. 'Each scenario represented one of four levels of clinical concern based on a total calculated MEWS score. Physiologic assessment findings were written out in the simulated rooms for research subjects to assign a score directly onto the MEWS instrument. Each assigned score was added together to compute a total MEWS score and recorded on the tool. Total scores were translated by test subjects into assignment of a MEWS color and associated algorithm.' Higher scores represent worsening patient conditions. The derived color recording and steps to alert other clinicians of concern for declining condition were documented on the paper tool.' After an approximate three-week interval, subjects will repeat the procedure at time two.' The ordinal level paired scores at time one and time two will analyzed using Spearman's Rho to compute test-retest reliability of the MEWS tool for use in this sample. Results: The results are pending testing.' Conclusion: The proposed study will establish reliability and validity of an EWSS tool modified for institutional use. Publishing of research findings add to nursing body of knowledge available to guide institutional modification and adoption of EWSS clinical tools. With a paucity of published reliability testing and established validity of MEWS instruments, this research attempts to address identified research gaps.'Simulated scenarios can help establish reliability of a MEWS tool through preplanning confounding variable control measures.
Keywords:
Reliability Testing; Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS); Instrument Validation
CINAHL Headings:
Severity of Illness Indices; Instrument Validation; Reliability and Validity
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST117
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleReliability Testing of a Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) Systemen
dc.contributor.authorDunkle, Stephanie R.en
dc.contributor.authorWhitley, Erinen
dc.contributor.authorRoney, Jamie K.en
dc.contributor.authorMaples, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorLong, JoAnn D.en
dc.contributor.authorMarchand, Stacien
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Stacyen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsStephanie R. Dunkle, RN, sdunkle@covhs.org; Erin Whitley, RN; Jamie K. Roney, RN-BC, CCRN-K; Jessica Maples, RN-BC; JoAnn D. Long, RN, NEA-BC; Staci Marchand, RN; Stacy Hughes, RN, OCNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601994-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: Internationally there is a lack of consensus on what should be included in modified early warning scoring (MEWS) tools. Furthermore, few studies have reported reliability and validity testing of MEWS tools. Further, few studies have reported reliability and validity testing of MEWS tools.' The purpose of this study researchers sought to report reliability testing of the Covenant Health MEWS tool for use in an adult medical-surgical population. Background: Vital sign and assessment findings recording by nurses do not necessarily translate into rapid recognition of a patient's deteriorating condition. With signs of health condition declining evident hours before an adverse event occurrence, clinical MEWS tools quantify and rank physiological assessment findings triggering life-saving care. MEWS assessment tools can assist healthcare providers in the rapid detection and recognition of subtle changes in patient condition signaling clinical deterioration. Comprehensive literature review findings indicated the need for more rigorous testing and reporting of the reliability of MEWS tools in relationship to patient outcomes. 'The development of the MEWS instrument was initiated from shared governance committee responsible for patient safety. The MEWS tool was developed following a comprehensive literature review and a plan-do-check-act (PDCA) cycle process for improvement and preliminary testing of the tool.' The purpose of this study is to test reproducibility of the Covenant Health MEWS tool using a test-retest design. Methods:'A convenience sample of critical care nurses (n=32) from a nonprofit acute care facility (881 licensed beds) were recruited for reliability testing of the Covenant Health MEWS form. At time one, testing will be conducted in a simulation laboratory adjacent to the hospital using four low-fidelity mock hospital simulation scenarios developed from clinical data from hospitalized patients who died from sepsis. 'Each scenario represented one of four levels of clinical concern based on a total calculated MEWS score. Physiologic assessment findings were written out in the simulated rooms for research subjects to assign a score directly onto the MEWS instrument. Each assigned score was added together to compute a total MEWS score and recorded on the tool. Total scores were translated by test subjects into assignment of a MEWS color and associated algorithm.' Higher scores represent worsening patient conditions. The derived color recording and steps to alert other clinicians of concern for declining condition were documented on the paper tool.' After an approximate three-week interval, subjects will repeat the procedure at time two.' The ordinal level paired scores at time one and time two will analyzed using Spearman's Rho to compute test-retest reliability of the MEWS tool for use in this sample. Results: The results are pending testing.' Conclusion: The proposed study will establish reliability and validity of an EWSS tool modified for institutional use. Publishing of research findings add to nursing body of knowledge available to guide institutional modification and adoption of EWSS clinical tools. With a paucity of published reliability testing and established validity of MEWS instruments, this research attempts to address identified research gaps.'Simulated scenarios can help establish reliability of a MEWS tool through preplanning confounding variable control measures.en
dc.subjectReliability Testingen
dc.subjectModified Early Warning Score (MEWS)en
dc.subjectInstrument Validationen
dc.subject.cinahlSeverity of Illness Indicesen
dc.subject.cinahlInstrument Validationen
dc.subject.cinahlReliability and Validityen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:01:02Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:01:02Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.