Nurse Leadership Competency Self-Assessment Study: Identifying Leadership Development Needs for a Healthcare System

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601995
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Leadership Competency Self-Assessment Study: Identifying Leadership Development Needs for a Healthcare System
Other Titles:
Topics in Nursing Leadership [Session]
Author(s):
Stichler, Jaynelle F.; Ecoff, Laurie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Gamma
Author Details:
Jaynelle F. Stichler, RN, NEA-BC, FACHE, FAAN, jstichler@aol.com; Laurie Ecoff, RN, NEA-BC
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: Nurse leaders, regardless of the level of their position, should be competent in: 1) communication and relationship building; 2) knowledge of the healthcare environment; 3) leadership; 4) professionalism; and 5) business skills. Although most leaders are educationally prepared for their roles, many managers and front-line leaders (clinical leads) who interface most with patients, families, physicians and staff are the least prepared for leadership roles. The purpose this study was to measure self-assessed competencies of nurse leaders and use baseline results in designing an educational curriculum to expand knowledge and competence in AONE leadership domains. Two research questions were studied: 1) How do nurses in leadership positions self-rate their competencies in AONE leadership domains; and 2) What are the differences in self-assessed competency levels based on educational background, years of experience in a leadership position, and number of leadership classes taken? Cognitive, skill-based and affective learning theories guided the study. These theories support the use of self-assessment tools to measure and use content knowledge as a foundation for application of knowledge. Methods: Methods: The study was conducted in a multi-hospital system with a sample of nursing leads (charge nurses), managers, and directors. This cross-sectional quantitative survey study used a convenience non-probability sample of nurse leaders working in a large healthcare system. Modified AONE Executive Leadership and Nurse Manager self-assessment instruments were used with a 5 point scale using Benner???s Novice to Expert response set: 1) novice, 2) advanced beginner, 3) competent, 4) proficient, and 5) expert. A Demographic survey was used to describe the sample (18 items). After IRB approval was obtained, the surveys were administered to consented particpants using paper and pencil surveys. Results: Results: Directors (n = 13) had been a manager (M = 9.6 years) before being a Director (M = 6.8 years), and had taken an average of 14.3 management courses. Most were prepared at the Master???s level (7) and 3 at the doctorate level. The lowest mean scores were noted for the Business Skill (M = 3.85) and Knowledge of the Health Care Environment domains (3.86). The total scale competency level was 3.96 (Proficient). There were no significant differences noted on the mean scores for the AONE competency domains when controlled for years as a manager or director, management courses taken or highest degree earned. Highest levels of competency were noted in Leadership (M =4.23; Proficient) and Professionalism (M = 4.36, Proficient). ??Managers (n = 96) had 8.73 years as a manager and had taken management courses (M=9.8). The majority were Baccalaureate prepared (69). The lowest mean scores were noted for Managing the Business (M=2.88), Leading the People (M = 3.69) and Creating the Leader in Yourself (M = 3.66) with an overall competency mean of 3.19 (competent).?? No significant differences were noted in the mean scores when controlled for years as a manager or number of management courses taken. Significant differences were noted with highest degree earned and several subscales and domains. The Post- survey is currently in analysis. Conclusion: Conclusions: Results were used to develop a 1-2 day workshop or 2 hour blocks of education focusing on content in Knowing the Health Care Environment, Managing the Business of Healthcare, and Leading Yourself and Others. Nurse managers and Leads reflected the greatest developmental growth with the educational intervention.
Keywords:
Leadership Development; Leadership competencies; Self-assessment
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15L11
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleNurse Leadership Competency Self-Assessment Study: Identifying Leadership Development Needs for a Healthcare Systemen
dc.title.alternativeTopics in Nursing Leadership [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorStichler, Jaynelle F.en
dc.contributor.authorEcoff, Laurieen
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Gammaen
dc.author.detailsJaynelle F. Stichler, RN, NEA-BC, FACHE, FAAN, jstichler@aol.com; Laurie Ecoff, RN, NEA-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601995-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: Nurse leaders, regardless of the level of their position, should be competent in: 1) communication and relationship building; 2) knowledge of the healthcare environment; 3) leadership; 4) professionalism; and 5) business skills. Although most leaders are educationally prepared for their roles, many managers and front-line leaders (clinical leads) who interface most with patients, families, physicians and staff are the least prepared for leadership roles. The purpose this study was to measure self-assessed competencies of nurse leaders and use baseline results in designing an educational curriculum to expand knowledge and competence in AONE leadership domains. Two research questions were studied: 1) How do nurses in leadership positions self-rate their competencies in AONE leadership domains; and 2) What are the differences in self-assessed competency levels based on educational background, years of experience in a leadership position, and number of leadership classes taken? Cognitive, skill-based and affective learning theories guided the study. These theories support the use of self-assessment tools to measure and use content knowledge as a foundation for application of knowledge. Methods: Methods: The study was conducted in a multi-hospital system with a sample of nursing leads (charge nurses), managers, and directors. This cross-sectional quantitative survey study used a convenience non-probability sample of nurse leaders working in a large healthcare system. Modified AONE Executive Leadership and Nurse Manager self-assessment instruments were used with a 5 point scale using Benner???s Novice to Expert response set: 1) novice, 2) advanced beginner, 3) competent, 4) proficient, and 5) expert. A Demographic survey was used to describe the sample (18 items). After IRB approval was obtained, the surveys were administered to consented particpants using paper and pencil surveys. Results: Results: Directors (n = 13) had been a manager (M = 9.6 years) before being a Director (M = 6.8 years), and had taken an average of 14.3 management courses. Most were prepared at the Master???s level (7) and 3 at the doctorate level. The lowest mean scores were noted for the Business Skill (M = 3.85) and Knowledge of the Health Care Environment domains (3.86). The total scale competency level was 3.96 (Proficient). There were no significant differences noted on the mean scores for the AONE competency domains when controlled for years as a manager or director, management courses taken or highest degree earned. Highest levels of competency were noted in Leadership (M =4.23; Proficient) and Professionalism (M = 4.36, Proficient). ??Managers (n = 96) had 8.73 years as a manager and had taken management courses (M=9.8). The majority were Baccalaureate prepared (69). The lowest mean scores were noted for Managing the Business (M=2.88), Leading the People (M = 3.69) and Creating the Leader in Yourself (M = 3.66) with an overall competency mean of 3.19 (competent).?? No significant differences were noted in the mean scores when controlled for years as a manager or number of management courses taken. Significant differences were noted with highest degree earned and several subscales and domains. The Post- survey is currently in analysis. Conclusion: Conclusions: Results were used to develop a 1-2 day workshop or 2 hour blocks of education focusing on content in Knowing the Health Care Environment, Managing the Business of Healthcare, and Leading Yourself and Others. Nurse managers and Leads reflected the greatest developmental growth with the educational intervention.en
dc.subjectLeadership Developmenten
dc.subjectLeadership competenciesen
dc.subjectSelf-assessmenten
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:01:04Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:01:04Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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