Enhancing Interprofessional Education through Technology-Supported Simulation: Lessons Learned

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602010
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Enhancing Interprofessional Education through Technology-Supported Simulation: Lessons Learned
Other Titles:
Enhancing Learning through Simulation [Session]
Author(s):
March, Alice L.; Yerby, Lea G.; Lawrence, Jeannine C.; Huebner, Robin
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Omega
Author Details:
Alice L. March, RN, FNP-C, CNE, almarch@bama.ua.edu; Lea G. Yerby; Jeannine C. Lawrence, RD, LD; Robin Huebner, LCSW, PIP
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Although advances have been made the U.S. healthcare system continues to rely heavily on the silo model of education and practice. Students learn about their profession and practitioners provide care at their level of training, but often for only one disease and without the knowledge or understanding of the complementary roles of other healthcare professions in patient care. Therefore, patients with multiple chronic conditions receive fragmented care affecting cost, safety, effectiveness, quality of life, and mortality. Practitioners must be trained to collaborate in interprofessional (IP) teams. This cannot happen without each person becoming aware of the roles and responsibilities of others. Well-integrated IP teams increase patients??? physical functioning, well-being, perceptions of control, self-efficacy, quality of life, satisfaction with services, and reduce healthcare costs. The purpose of the course and learning outcomes evaluation was to assess self-reported perceptions of effectiveness of the simulation in meeting course objectives, including synthesis of IP collaborative practice concepts. A team-based approach to learning stresses shared leadership, fostering growth in the skills needed to be effective drivers of healthcare change. Most IP course and capstone simulations are face-to-face, with a focus on acute care and critical decision-making. The innovation of this course and capstone event was the ability for virtual attendance by distance students during a technology-supported simulation learning experience; thus providing early IP education to crystalize application of didactic content from the online portion of this blended platform approach. The skill set acquired from the course included competencies established by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) and TeamSTEPPS?? for primary care. Critical steps for the success of technology-supported teleconferencing include early communication, advanced planning and practice, and access to proper equipment. Technology support was essential to connect virtual students during simulation and debriefing, and to stream debriefing to overflow rooms. Methods: This semester long IP course included nursing, medicine, nutrition, and social work students. It combined online didactic material, unfolding case studies, and culminated with a technology-supported simulated capstone experience utilizing standardized patients. The format ensured inclusion of communication, values and ethic, roles and responsibilities, teamwork, and embedded four TeamSTEPPS?? skills of (leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication). Students used a mobile app to connect to telehealth carts with built-in teleconferencing devices. Test calls were completed in advance to troubleshoot connection issues, ensure call reliability, and assess audio/video quality. Several sessions were needed to establish connections, confirming the importance of advanced planning. Even after a mock session there were unexpected complications. To stream the debriefing session into another room, a room with a built-in teleconferencing system served as the base-room.?? Multiple cameras and microphones covered the room and a telehealth cart connected the audio/visual system to the destination room. Results: Thirty students attended the event, and eighteen students responded to the non-required survey. The majority of students reported a positive simulation experience and learning expectations were met (88.9%). Students reported that the technology-supported simulation was effective in meeting course objectives, including synthesis of IP collaborative practice concepts (66.7%), enhanced knowledge of professional roles (66.7%), and a better understanding of how working within an IP team improves rural healthcare (66.7%). Specific to IPEC objectives, they reported the event was effective in meeting objectives related to core competencies (88.9%), collaboration (83.3%), professional roles (72.2%), and teamwork (83.3%). Conclusion: There were many lessons learned from this experience. Unexpected problems that could have been avoided included (1) a remote student connected into the simulation session mid-stream causing some disruption, but this is like real life behavior; (2) students in the second session may have had an advantage because they have time to get to know each other and to plan roles before starting the simulation session, while students in the first session were immediately ushered into the simulation without the orientation time; (3) use of standard release form was not sufficient; ??Revisions to the course and the simulation experience should include: (1) stream simulation into additional rooms to be viewed by other students and faculty, (2) students should have the opportunity to watch all recorded sessions at a later time; (3) revise student release forms to allow use of photos/videos in portfolio.
Keywords:
learning outcomes; simulation; interprofessional
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15J15
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEnhancing Interprofessional Education through Technology-Supported Simulation: Lessons Learneden
dc.title.alternativeEnhancing Learning through Simulation [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorMarch, Alice L.en
dc.contributor.authorYerby, Lea G.en
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Jeannine C.en
dc.contributor.authorHuebner, Robinen
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Omegaen
dc.author.detailsAlice L. March, RN, FNP-C, CNE, almarch@bama.ua.edu; Lea G. Yerby; Jeannine C. Lawrence, RD, LD; Robin Huebner, LCSW, PIPen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602010-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Although advances have been made the U.S. healthcare system continues to rely heavily on the silo model of education and practice. Students learn about their profession and practitioners provide care at their level of training, but often for only one disease and without the knowledge or understanding of the complementary roles of other healthcare professions in patient care. Therefore, patients with multiple chronic conditions receive fragmented care affecting cost, safety, effectiveness, quality of life, and mortality. Practitioners must be trained to collaborate in interprofessional (IP) teams. This cannot happen without each person becoming aware of the roles and responsibilities of others. Well-integrated IP teams increase patients??? physical functioning, well-being, perceptions of control, self-efficacy, quality of life, satisfaction with services, and reduce healthcare costs. The purpose of the course and learning outcomes evaluation was to assess self-reported perceptions of effectiveness of the simulation in meeting course objectives, including synthesis of IP collaborative practice concepts. A team-based approach to learning stresses shared leadership, fostering growth in the skills needed to be effective drivers of healthcare change. Most IP course and capstone simulations are face-to-face, with a focus on acute care and critical decision-making. The innovation of this course and capstone event was the ability for virtual attendance by distance students during a technology-supported simulation learning experience; thus providing early IP education to crystalize application of didactic content from the online portion of this blended platform approach. The skill set acquired from the course included competencies established by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) and TeamSTEPPS?? for primary care. Critical steps for the success of technology-supported teleconferencing include early communication, advanced planning and practice, and access to proper equipment. Technology support was essential to connect virtual students during simulation and debriefing, and to stream debriefing to overflow rooms. Methods: This semester long IP course included nursing, medicine, nutrition, and social work students. It combined online didactic material, unfolding case studies, and culminated with a technology-supported simulated capstone experience utilizing standardized patients. The format ensured inclusion of communication, values and ethic, roles and responsibilities, teamwork, and embedded four TeamSTEPPS?? skills of (leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication). Students used a mobile app to connect to telehealth carts with built-in teleconferencing devices. Test calls were completed in advance to troubleshoot connection issues, ensure call reliability, and assess audio/video quality. Several sessions were needed to establish connections, confirming the importance of advanced planning. Even after a mock session there were unexpected complications. To stream the debriefing session into another room, a room with a built-in teleconferencing system served as the base-room.?? Multiple cameras and microphones covered the room and a telehealth cart connected the audio/visual system to the destination room. Results: Thirty students attended the event, and eighteen students responded to the non-required survey. The majority of students reported a positive simulation experience and learning expectations were met (88.9%). Students reported that the technology-supported simulation was effective in meeting course objectives, including synthesis of IP collaborative practice concepts (66.7%), enhanced knowledge of professional roles (66.7%), and a better understanding of how working within an IP team improves rural healthcare (66.7%). Specific to IPEC objectives, they reported the event was effective in meeting objectives related to core competencies (88.9%), collaboration (83.3%), professional roles (72.2%), and teamwork (83.3%). Conclusion: There were many lessons learned from this experience. Unexpected problems that could have been avoided included (1) a remote student connected into the simulation session mid-stream causing some disruption, but this is like real life behavior; (2) students in the second session may have had an advantage because they have time to get to know each other and to plan roles before starting the simulation session, while students in the first session were immediately ushered into the simulation without the orientation time; (3) use of standard release form was not sufficient; ??Revisions to the course and the simulation experience should include: (1) stream simulation into additional rooms to be viewed by other students and faculty, (2) students should have the opportunity to watch all recorded sessions at a later time; (3) revise student release forms to allow use of photos/videos in portfolio.en
dc.subjectlearning outcomesen
dc.subjectsimulationen
dc.subjectinterprofessionalen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:01:28Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:01:28Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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