2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602018
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Death and Dying: End-of-Life Care in Nepal Buddhist and Hindu Cultures
Author(s):
Davies, Timothy M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Timothy M. Davies, , tmdavies@svsu.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this research was to learn more about end-of-life nursing care for individuals in the Hindu and Buddhist cultures, specifically in Nepal. The purpose of this presentation is to inform others, specifically the nursing community, of end of life care for Buddhist and Hindu cultures.' Methods: This study was based on reviews of research studies generated from Google Scholar and CINAHL, as well as from interviews of Buddhist and Hindu individuals. The data were gathered, reviewed, and included in the study. Results: The studies and interviews reviewed showed that in general, Buddhists believe that the human body is only a temporary composite which dissolve at death, although some stream of consciousness undergoes rebirth. It is important that the dying individual be in a clear state of mind at time of death as it is believed their state of mind influences rebirth. Death is viewed as natural and inevitable; therefore they traditionally have more tranquil and accepting attitudes toward death. The studies and interviews reviewed showed that in general, Hindus believe in cycles of being born and dying, karma, and a supreme being who exists in the universe and in the individual souls, and who is the ultimate end for all. Hope lies in making spiritual progress and moksha, or liberation from the cycles of rebirth. Preservation of life is balanced against the acceptance that dying is natural and a step closer to moksha. Family members are central in the decision making process and care during end-of-life care. Conclusion: The studies described how end-of-life care should be handled for a Hindu and Buddhist patient and their family. The findings support engaging both the patient and their family in the planning of care and a peaceful and quiet environment during the time leading up to death. It was found that it is especially important to consult the patient and family concerning medications that can alter consciousness, as it is important for the dying to have a clear mind at death. It is also important to be respectful of after-death rituals and body removal practices.
Keywords:
Buddhism; Hinduism; "End of life care"
MeSH:
Hinduism
CINAHL Headings:
Palliative Care; Buddhism
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST435
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleDeath and Dying: End-of-Life Care in Nepal Buddhist and Hindu Culturesen
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Timothy M.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsTimothy M. Davies, , tmdavies@svsu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602018-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this research was to learn more about end-of-life nursing care for individuals in the Hindu and Buddhist cultures, specifically in Nepal. The purpose of this presentation is to inform others, specifically the nursing community, of end of life care for Buddhist and Hindu cultures.' Methods: This study was based on reviews of research studies generated from Google Scholar and CINAHL, as well as from interviews of Buddhist and Hindu individuals. The data were gathered, reviewed, and included in the study. Results: The studies and interviews reviewed showed that in general, Buddhists believe that the human body is only a temporary composite which dissolve at death, although some stream of consciousness undergoes rebirth. It is important that the dying individual be in a clear state of mind at time of death as it is believed their state of mind influences rebirth. Death is viewed as natural and inevitable; therefore they traditionally have more tranquil and accepting attitudes toward death. The studies and interviews reviewed showed that in general, Hindus believe in cycles of being born and dying, karma, and a supreme being who exists in the universe and in the individual souls, and who is the ultimate end for all. Hope lies in making spiritual progress and moksha, or liberation from the cycles of rebirth. Preservation of life is balanced against the acceptance that dying is natural and a step closer to moksha. Family members are central in the decision making process and care during end-of-life care. Conclusion: The studies described how end-of-life care should be handled for a Hindu and Buddhist patient and their family. The findings support engaging both the patient and their family in the planning of care and a peaceful and quiet environment during the time leading up to death. It was found that it is especially important to consult the patient and family concerning medications that can alter consciousness, as it is important for the dying to have a clear mind at death. It is also important to be respectful of after-death rituals and body removal practices.en
dc.subjectBuddhismen
dc.subjectHinduismen
dc.subject"End of life care"en
dc.subject.meshHinduismen
dc.subject.cinahlPalliative Careen
dc.subject.cinahlBuddhismen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:01:41Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:01:41Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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