Influence of Early Language Exposure on Children's Cognitive and Language Development

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602027
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Influence of Early Language Exposure on Children's Cognitive and Language Development
Other Titles:
Enhancing Early Childhood Health [Session]
Author(s):
Head, Lauren M.; Darcy Mahoney, Ashley
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Epsilon
Author Details:
Lauren M. Head, BSN, RN, lmhead@emory.edu; Ashley Darcy Mahoney, PhD, NNP-BC
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Early childhood represents a critical period for brain development, in which foundations for later learning are established. Brain development is shaped through environmental experiences, including language exposure and parental engagement. Research shows that low-income children hear 30 million less words than their more affluent peers by the age of 4, and that this word gap contributes to disparities in their educational outcomes. As interventions aimed at bridging the word gap develop, literature should be evaluated to examine the influence of early language exposure on children???s neurodevelopment. Methods: An integrated review of literature was conducted to evaluate the effect of parental engagement (talking, reading, and interacting) in early childhood (0-3 years) on children???s language or cognitive development. The following search terms were used: (infant OR newborn OR toddler) AND (infant-directed speech OR child-directed speech OR talk OR OR read OR engage OR interact OR conversation) AND (parent OR caregiver) AND (literacy OR language acquisition OR vocabulary OR cognition OR academic OR language development OR neurodevelopmental outcomes). Articles published from 1990-2014 were identified through PubMed, Web of Science, and CINAHL databases. Reference lists of identified articles were manually searched for additional eligible articles not detected by the electronic search. For inclusion, the articles had to meet the following criteria: 1) report the effect of talking, reading, or interacting 2) children had to be 0-36 months old at the first or all assessments 3) evaluate vocabulary, language, or cognitive outcomes 4) be a primary-research article, secondary data analysis, meta-analysis, or systematic review 5) be in a peer-reviewed journal. Results: Of the 1273 articles identified, 109 articles met the search criteria. Studies revealed that the number of words spoken to a child, but not overheard speech, is associated with better scores on vocabulary and cognitive assessments and enhanced language processing. Furthermore, diversity of words, grammatical complexity, number of conversational turns, engagement in joint attention and greater use of imitations, expansions, interpretations, and gestures are related to expressive and receptive language skills and moderate the association between social risks and cognitive outcomes. In addition, children who are read to more frequently have larger vocabularies and maternal responsiveness and father involvement positively influence language and cognitive development. Interestingly, the positive effects of talking, reading, and interacting are more pronounced in children with or at-risk for developmental delays. Conclusion: In conclusion, the quantity and quality of talking, reading, and interacting with a child in the first three years of life predict language and cognitive development. As a result, interventions aimed at increasing the quality and quantity of early language exposure and promoting parental engagement have the potential to leverage dramatic results for children???s developmental outcomes and future educational success.
Keywords:
early childhood development; language exposure; parental engagement
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15J03
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleInfluence of Early Language Exposure on Children's Cognitive and Language Developmenten
dc.title.alternativeEnhancing Early Childhood Health [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorHead, Lauren M.en
dc.contributor.authorDarcy Mahoney, Ashleyen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Epsilonen
dc.author.detailsLauren M. Head, BSN, RN, lmhead@emory.edu; Ashley Darcy Mahoney, PhD, NNP-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602027-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Early childhood represents a critical period for brain development, in which foundations for later learning are established. Brain development is shaped through environmental experiences, including language exposure and parental engagement. Research shows that low-income children hear 30 million less words than their more affluent peers by the age of 4, and that this word gap contributes to disparities in their educational outcomes. As interventions aimed at bridging the word gap develop, literature should be evaluated to examine the influence of early language exposure on children???s neurodevelopment. Methods: An integrated review of literature was conducted to evaluate the effect of parental engagement (talking, reading, and interacting) in early childhood (0-3 years) on children???s language or cognitive development. The following search terms were used: (infant OR newborn OR toddler) AND (infant-directed speech OR child-directed speech OR talk OR OR read OR engage OR interact OR conversation) AND (parent OR caregiver) AND (literacy OR language acquisition OR vocabulary OR cognition OR academic OR language development OR neurodevelopmental outcomes). Articles published from 1990-2014 were identified through PubMed, Web of Science, and CINAHL databases. Reference lists of identified articles were manually searched for additional eligible articles not detected by the electronic search. For inclusion, the articles had to meet the following criteria: 1) report the effect of talking, reading, or interacting 2) children had to be 0-36 months old at the first or all assessments 3) evaluate vocabulary, language, or cognitive outcomes 4) be a primary-research article, secondary data analysis, meta-analysis, or systematic review 5) be in a peer-reviewed journal. Results: Of the 1273 articles identified, 109 articles met the search criteria. Studies revealed that the number of words spoken to a child, but not overheard speech, is associated with better scores on vocabulary and cognitive assessments and enhanced language processing. Furthermore, diversity of words, grammatical complexity, number of conversational turns, engagement in joint attention and greater use of imitations, expansions, interpretations, and gestures are related to expressive and receptive language skills and moderate the association between social risks and cognitive outcomes. In addition, children who are read to more frequently have larger vocabularies and maternal responsiveness and father involvement positively influence language and cognitive development. Interestingly, the positive effects of talking, reading, and interacting are more pronounced in children with or at-risk for developmental delays. Conclusion: In conclusion, the quantity and quality of talking, reading, and interacting with a child in the first three years of life predict language and cognitive development. As a result, interventions aimed at increasing the quality and quantity of early language exposure and promoting parental engagement have the potential to leverage dramatic results for children???s developmental outcomes and future educational success.en
dc.subjectearly childhood developmenten
dc.subjectlanguage exposureen
dc.subjectparental engagementen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:01:56Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:01:56Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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