2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602039
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Narrowing the Digital Divide: Best Practices in Group Work
Author(s):
Fierro, Ryann D.; Monsivais, Diane B.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Ryann D. Fierro, RN, rdfierro@utep.edu; Diane B. Monsivais, RN, CNE
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Problem/BackgroundOnline learning provides students with an unprecedented flexibility for higher education opportunities, but also may often be accompanied by stressful challenges specifically related to the online environment. Without proper management of stressful online challenges, rising stress levels have the potential to deteriorate into uncivil behaviors that can easily have a negative impact on student success. Currently available best- practice guidelines for online education provide general guidance regarding the development and management of the online classroom. 'However, it is often necessary to consider institution-specific data along with best practice guidelines in order to develop focused, instead of general, strategies for managing the stressful challenges inherent in online education. A recent survey (Incivility in Online Learning Environment (IOLE) survey (Clark, 2012))' at The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) School of Nursing was used to measure perceptions and frequencies of uncivil behaviors by faculty and students in the online learning environment (OLE), perceptions surrounding challenges and advantages in the OLE, and ideas for promoting civility in the OLE. The survey was completed by 100 participants (Faculty, n=23 and students n=67). For students, group work was identified as one of the most common stressful challenges. Group work is defined as being assigned to work with a subset of the online class (typically 3-5 students) to complete an assignment. Reasons given by the students for the dissatisfaction included the perception that there was usually a group member who did not do his or her share of the work, or did not produce the work at an acceptable level. The other group members then had to work harder to earn a good grade which the underachieving group member then benefited from. Additionally, communication problems related to work schedules or appropriate document sharing tools created further difficulties. These stresses produced instances of uncivil behavior toward each other which interfered with the learning environment, creating a 'digital divide' among online group members. Because group work has been shown to be an effective way of building collaborative online communities, we sought to find best practice strategies for implementing group work that would promote civil, successful learning environments and narrow the digital divide among students This presentation will present best practices/recommendations in the literature for managing the challenges related to group work, and how those practices can be used to create civil and successful learning environments. ObjectiveIntegrative literature review of best practice and/or recommendations for successful group work activities in the online education MethodsThe following PICO question guided the literature search. Population: 'Graduate students in online programs Issue of interest: Strategies for group work that facilitate civil and successful learning environments C: Current practice Outcomes: Recommendations from students and faculty about creating effective group activities'''''''''''''''' A librarian was consulted to assist with setting up the search Databases searched were: CINAHL, ERIC, Academic Search Complete, Business Source Complete, Education Full Text-H.W. Wilson, Cochrane Library Other sources: Campbell Collaboration, Best Evidence Medical Education (website), Faculty Focus Newsletter Search terms: Online education, distance education, virtual education, group work, collaborative learning, best practices, guidelines or evidence based strategies. Inclusion: Quantitative and qualitative articles from 2000 and later dealing with online education and group work experiences Some of the most commonly recommended findings includeEmphasize value of group work Provide guidance on skills needed to be successful Limit group size Allow students to self-select their groups Provide means of reporting individual contributions as well as peer evaluations Create clear timeline for phases of project Establish goals and outcomes The addition of' specific school or university data (population-specific data),' to best practice guidelines will allow the development of targeted, instead of general, strategies for managing the challenges inherent in online education and decrease the potential for uncivil classroom behaviors that interfere with student success.
Keywords:
Online Education; Civil Learning Environment; Group Work
CINAHL Headings:
Education, Non-Traditional; Group�Processes--Education; Interpersonal Relations
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST284
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleNarrowing the Digital Divide: Best Practices in Group Worken
dc.contributor.authorFierro, Ryann D.en
dc.contributor.authorMonsivais, Diane B.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsRyann D. Fierro, RN, rdfierro@utep.edu; Diane B. Monsivais, RN, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602039-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Problem/BackgroundOnline learning provides students with an unprecedented flexibility for higher education opportunities, but also may often be accompanied by stressful challenges specifically related to the online environment. Without proper management of stressful online challenges, rising stress levels have the potential to deteriorate into uncivil behaviors that can easily have a negative impact on student success. Currently available best- practice guidelines for online education provide general guidance regarding the development and management of the online classroom. 'However, it is often necessary to consider institution-specific data along with best practice guidelines in order to develop focused, instead of general, strategies for managing the stressful challenges inherent in online education. A recent survey (Incivility in Online Learning Environment (IOLE) survey (Clark, 2012))' at The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) School of Nursing was used to measure perceptions and frequencies of uncivil behaviors by faculty and students in the online learning environment (OLE), perceptions surrounding challenges and advantages in the OLE, and ideas for promoting civility in the OLE. The survey was completed by 100 participants (Faculty, n=23 and students n=67). For students, group work was identified as one of the most common stressful challenges. Group work is defined as being assigned to work with a subset of the online class (typically 3-5 students) to complete an assignment. Reasons given by the students for the dissatisfaction included the perception that there was usually a group member who did not do his or her share of the work, or did not produce the work at an acceptable level. The other group members then had to work harder to earn a good grade which the underachieving group member then benefited from. Additionally, communication problems related to work schedules or appropriate document sharing tools created further difficulties. These stresses produced instances of uncivil behavior toward each other which interfered with the learning environment, creating a 'digital divide' among online group members. Because group work has been shown to be an effective way of building collaborative online communities, we sought to find best practice strategies for implementing group work that would promote civil, successful learning environments and narrow the digital divide among students This presentation will present best practices/recommendations in the literature for managing the challenges related to group work, and how those practices can be used to create civil and successful learning environments. ObjectiveIntegrative literature review of best practice and/or recommendations for successful group work activities in the online education MethodsThe following PICO question guided the literature search. Population: 'Graduate students in online programs Issue of interest: Strategies for group work that facilitate civil and successful learning environments C: Current practice Outcomes: Recommendations from students and faculty about creating effective group activities'''''''''''''''' A librarian was consulted to assist with setting up the search Databases searched were: CINAHL, ERIC, Academic Search Complete, Business Source Complete, Education Full Text-H.W. Wilson, Cochrane Library Other sources: Campbell Collaboration, Best Evidence Medical Education (website), Faculty Focus Newsletter Search terms: Online education, distance education, virtual education, group work, collaborative learning, best practices, guidelines or evidence based strategies. Inclusion: Quantitative and qualitative articles from 2000 and later dealing with online education and group work experiences Some of the most commonly recommended findings includeEmphasize value of group work Provide guidance on skills needed to be successful Limit group size Allow students to self-select their groups Provide means of reporting individual contributions as well as peer evaluations Create clear timeline for phases of project Establish goals and outcomes The addition of' specific school or university data (population-specific data),' to best practice guidelines will allow the development of targeted, instead of general, strategies for managing the challenges inherent in online education and decrease the potential for uncivil classroom behaviors that interfere with student success.en
dc.subjectOnline Educationen
dc.subjectCivil Learning Environmenten
dc.subjectGroup Worken
dc.subject.cinahlEducation, Non-Traditionalen
dc.subject.cinahlGroup�Processes--Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlInterpersonal Relationsen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:02:15Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:02:15Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.