2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602043
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
A Decade of Parent-Child Sex Communication: A Systematic Review, 2003-2013
Author(s):
Flores, Dalmacio Dennis; Barroso, Julie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Epsilon
Author Details:
Dalmacio Dennis Flores, ACRN, dalmacio.flores@duke.edu; Julie Barroso, ANP-BC, RN, FAAN
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Conversations between parents and children about sex can result in the transmission of family expectations, societal values, and role modeling of sexual health risk reduction strategies. Parent-child sex communication's (PCSC) potential to curb negative sexual health outcomes has sustained a multidisciplinary effort to better understand the process and its impact on the development of healthy sexual attitudes and behaviors among adolescents. Studies that include novel theoretical and empirical findings have been published recently and now require critical analysis and synthesis. The purpose of this review is to advance what is known about PCSC by summarizing descriptive studies and appraising literature published from 2003 to 2013. Methods: Using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO and Pubmed, the key-terms 'parent child' AND 'sex education' were entered for initial query; 130 original articles were included for analysis. Study findings were abstracted into a matrix to determine the content, process, and predictors of PCSC, including its effects on adolescents. Results: Parent and child gender, race, parental education, prior communication from their own parents, and embarrassment continue to determine the process and content of sex conversations in the home. Mothers talk more to their children about sex than fathers and parents are more inclined to talk about sex only after physical and behavioral changes in their children have been observed. Messages for sons are seen as more permissive about sex while daughters receive more restrictive instructions. Parents report a sense of responsibility to educate their children about sex, yet worry that PCSC may imply parental permission. Children want more discussions about emotions and how to deal with the opposite sex, yet mostly receive instructions on delaying sex. African American and Latino/Hispanic parent-child dyads report more ease with PCSC, while Asian American children report receiving the least amount of PCSC. There is discrepancy in parent and child reports about PCSC frequency and quality. Conclusion: Findings confirm that variability in how PCSC occurs may be lost opportunities in helping children transition into young adults with normative sexual needs. Understanding PCSC typologies based on familial intricacies may assist with formulating ways to facilitate these discussions. Areas for future research will be discussed.
Keywords:
sex communication; parent-child; adolescent sexual health
MeSH:
Sex Education; Parent-Child Relations; Communication
CINAHL Headings:
Reproductive�Health--In Adolescence; Sexual Health
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST439
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleA Decade of Parent-Child Sex Communication: A Systematic Review, 2003-2013en
dc.contributor.authorFlores, Dalmacio Dennisen
dc.contributor.authorBarroso, Julieen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Epsilonen
dc.author.detailsDalmacio Dennis Flores, ACRN, dalmacio.flores@duke.edu; Julie Barroso, ANP-BC, RN, FAANen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602043-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Conversations between parents and children about sex can result in the transmission of family expectations, societal values, and role modeling of sexual health risk reduction strategies. Parent-child sex communication's (PCSC) potential to curb negative sexual health outcomes has sustained a multidisciplinary effort to better understand the process and its impact on the development of healthy sexual attitudes and behaviors among adolescents. Studies that include novel theoretical and empirical findings have been published recently and now require critical analysis and synthesis. The purpose of this review is to advance what is known about PCSC by summarizing descriptive studies and appraising literature published from 2003 to 2013. Methods: Using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO and Pubmed, the key-terms 'parent child' AND 'sex education' were entered for initial query; 130 original articles were included for analysis. Study findings were abstracted into a matrix to determine the content, process, and predictors of PCSC, including its effects on adolescents. Results: Parent and child gender, race, parental education, prior communication from their own parents, and embarrassment continue to determine the process and content of sex conversations in the home. Mothers talk more to their children about sex than fathers and parents are more inclined to talk about sex only after physical and behavioral changes in their children have been observed. Messages for sons are seen as more permissive about sex while daughters receive more restrictive instructions. Parents report a sense of responsibility to educate their children about sex, yet worry that PCSC may imply parental permission. Children want more discussions about emotions and how to deal with the opposite sex, yet mostly receive instructions on delaying sex. African American and Latino/Hispanic parent-child dyads report more ease with PCSC, while Asian American children report receiving the least amount of PCSC. There is discrepancy in parent and child reports about PCSC frequency and quality. Conclusion: Findings confirm that variability in how PCSC occurs may be lost opportunities in helping children transition into young adults with normative sexual needs. Understanding PCSC typologies based on familial intricacies may assist with formulating ways to facilitate these discussions. Areas for future research will be discussed.en
dc.subjectsex communicationen
dc.subjectparent-childen
dc.subjectadolescent sexual healthen
dc.subject.meshSex Educationen
dc.subject.meshParent-Child Relationsen
dc.subject.meshCommunicationen
dc.subject.cinahlReproductive�Health--In Adolescenceen
dc.subject.cinahlSexual Healthen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:02:28Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:02:28Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.