Using Lay Health Workers to Promote Mammography Screening with African-American Women in the Emergency Department: An RCT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602049
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Using Lay Health Workers to Promote Mammography Screening with African-American Women in the Emergency Department: An RCT
Author(s):
Hatcher, Jennifer; Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Rayens, Mary Kay; Combs, Brenda
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jennifer Hatcher, RN, jennifer.hatcher@uky.edu; Nancy E. Schoenberg, PhD; Mary Kay Rayens, PhD; Brenda Combs, CHES
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Background:Although the majority of U.S. women currently obtain mammograms African American women continue to face challenges to adherence to breast cancer screening guidelines. These challenges have contributed to stunning disparities in breast cancer mortality rates for African American women versus other U.S. women. These disparities call for researchers to focus on innovative venues and approaches to encourage screening in this vulnerable population. 'The Emergency Room is one such venue where underserved populations may go to seek treatment. The use of lay health workers in this setting is an innovative approach to elimination of health disparities in this vulnerable group. ' Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a pilot intervention featuring a lay health worker to increase mammography utilization among African American women recruited from those waiting in the Emergency Department. Methods: This study was a three armed pilot of a randomized controlled trial (n=96)comparing the effects of a brief motivational interview delivered by a lay health worker with those of a targeted brochure and a usual care control group, all given by a lay health worker in the ED while women were in the waiting room. Results: The average age of the participants was 51.9, most women were not married (79.2%) and had an annual household income of $40,000 or less (84.1%). Thirty four percent of the women did not have health insurance or a primary care provider. All women enrolled in the study had not had a mammogram in the last year and were out of compliance with ACS guidelines. One quarter (23%) of the sample reported having never had a mammogram. More than a quarter of the sample received a mammogram during the study (27.4%). There was no group difference by mammography status at the 3 month follow up. Conclusions: Using innovative venues and approaches are necessary to eliminating health disparities for African American women and other vulnerable populations. One such innovative venue is the Emergency Department where more than a quarter of the women surveyed had never had a mammogram. The use of lay health workers in this setting was effective in all groups that were contacted in this setting. This increase in mammograms in this hard to reach group is evidence of the efficacy of these innovations.
Keywords:
lay health worker; cancer control; vulnerable populations
CINAHL Headings:
Mammography; Breast Neoplasms--Prevention�and�Control; Special Populations; Community Health Workers
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST234
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleUsing Lay Health Workers to Promote Mammography Screening with African-American Women in the Emergency Department: An RCTen
dc.contributor.authorHatcher, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorSchoenberg, Nancy E.en
dc.contributor.authorRayens, Mary Kayen
dc.contributor.authorCombs, Brendaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsJennifer Hatcher, RN, jennifer.hatcher@uky.edu; Nancy E. Schoenberg, PhD; Mary Kay Rayens, PhD; Brenda Combs, CHESen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602049-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Background:Although the majority of U.S. women currently obtain mammograms African American women continue to face challenges to adherence to breast cancer screening guidelines. These challenges have contributed to stunning disparities in breast cancer mortality rates for African American women versus other U.S. women. These disparities call for researchers to focus on innovative venues and approaches to encourage screening in this vulnerable population. 'The Emergency Room is one such venue where underserved populations may go to seek treatment. The use of lay health workers in this setting is an innovative approach to elimination of health disparities in this vulnerable group. ' Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a pilot intervention featuring a lay health worker to increase mammography utilization among African American women recruited from those waiting in the Emergency Department. Methods: This study was a three armed pilot of a randomized controlled trial (n=96)comparing the effects of a brief motivational interview delivered by a lay health worker with those of a targeted brochure and a usual care control group, all given by a lay health worker in the ED while women were in the waiting room. Results: The average age of the participants was 51.9, most women were not married (79.2%) and had an annual household income of $40,000 or less (84.1%). Thirty four percent of the women did not have health insurance or a primary care provider. All women enrolled in the study had not had a mammogram in the last year and were out of compliance with ACS guidelines. One quarter (23%) of the sample reported having never had a mammogram. More than a quarter of the sample received a mammogram during the study (27.4%). There was no group difference by mammography status at the 3 month follow up. Conclusions: Using innovative venues and approaches are necessary to eliminating health disparities for African American women and other vulnerable populations. One such innovative venue is the Emergency Department where more than a quarter of the women surveyed had never had a mammogram. The use of lay health workers in this setting was effective in all groups that were contacted in this setting. This increase in mammograms in this hard to reach group is evidence of the efficacy of these innovations.en
dc.subjectlay health workeren
dc.subjectcancer controlen
dc.subjectvulnerable populationsen
dc.subject.cinahlMammographyen
dc.subject.cinahlBreast Neoplasms--Prevention�and�Controlen
dc.subject.cinahlSpecial Populationsen
dc.subject.cinahlCommunity Health Workersen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:02:40Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:02:40Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.