Culture, Sex & Perceptions of HIV Risk among Ethnic Groups from the African Diaspora

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602055
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Culture, Sex & Perceptions of HIV Risk among Ethnic Groups from the African Diaspora
Author(s):
Hires, Kimberly A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Kimberly A. Hires, RN, kahires@fsu.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Much of the epidemiological data of HIV infection trends among black men and women in the United States is reported using historical racial classifications only. There is a dearth of comparative studies that examine cultural identity across immigrant groups and across different societies of the African Diaspora. An understanding of the influence of cultural identity within the context of HIV risk behavior and culture-specific factors among African-American, Black-Caribbean and African groups is absent. With a 30 year migration history and opportunities to maintain strong cultural traditions through travel and communication, levels of acculturation and adaptation may vary across foreign born, first generation and second generation black men and women who identify as African-American, Black-Caribbean or African in the US, thereby leaving precise intraethnic and interethnic similarities and variations in HIV risk factors unknown. The purpose of this study is to explore interactions between cultural identity, cultural concepts of sexual behavior, sexual communication, gender roles, perceptions of risk for HIV infection and culture-specific factors among adult men and women who reside in the US and identify as African-American, Black-Caribbean or African. Methods: African-American, Black-Caribbean and African men and women between the ages of 18-55 years were recruited via ads placed on Facebook and Craigslist. Participants completed an online questionnaire that collected data on cultural identity, cultural concepts of sexual behavior, sexual communication, gender roles, perceptions of risk for HIV infection and culture-specific factors. Results: Descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis and ANOVA was used to analyze data. 'The analysis was completed using Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 22. Conclusion: Knowledge of cultural variations of identity and factors that influence HIV risk will provide valuable insight to the HIV epidemic affecting Black populations in the US.
Keywords:
HIV; Black; Risk
CINAHL Headings:
Perception; HIV Infections--Risk Factors; Blacks
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST446
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleCulture, Sex & Perceptions of HIV Risk among Ethnic Groups from the African Diasporaen
dc.contributor.authorHires, Kimberly A.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsKimberly A. Hires, RN, kahires@fsu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602055-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Much of the epidemiological data of HIV infection trends among black men and women in the United States is reported using historical racial classifications only. There is a dearth of comparative studies that examine cultural identity across immigrant groups and across different societies of the African Diaspora. An understanding of the influence of cultural identity within the context of HIV risk behavior and culture-specific factors among African-American, Black-Caribbean and African groups is absent. With a 30 year migration history and opportunities to maintain strong cultural traditions through travel and communication, levels of acculturation and adaptation may vary across foreign born, first generation and second generation black men and women who identify as African-American, Black-Caribbean or African in the US, thereby leaving precise intraethnic and interethnic similarities and variations in HIV risk factors unknown. The purpose of this study is to explore interactions between cultural identity, cultural concepts of sexual behavior, sexual communication, gender roles, perceptions of risk for HIV infection and culture-specific factors among adult men and women who reside in the US and identify as African-American, Black-Caribbean or African. Methods: African-American, Black-Caribbean and African men and women between the ages of 18-55 years were recruited via ads placed on Facebook and Craigslist. Participants completed an online questionnaire that collected data on cultural identity, cultural concepts of sexual behavior, sexual communication, gender roles, perceptions of risk for HIV infection and culture-specific factors. Results: Descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis and ANOVA was used to analyze data. 'The analysis was completed using Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 22. Conclusion: Knowledge of cultural variations of identity and factors that influence HIV risk will provide valuable insight to the HIV epidemic affecting Black populations in the US.en
dc.subjectHIVen
dc.subjectBlacken
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subject.cinahlPerceptionen
dc.subject.cinahlHIV Infections--Risk Factorsen
dc.subject.cinahlBlacksen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:02:49Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:02:49Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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