Using Social Media and Text Messages to Promote Health in African-Americans: #HeartHealthyandCancerFree

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602065
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Using Social Media and Text Messages to Promote Health in African-Americans: #HeartHealthyandCancerFree
Author(s):
Jones, Allison R.; Hatcher, Jennifer; Combs, Brenda
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Psi
Author Details:
Allison R. Jones, RN, allisonroenker@gmail.com; Jennifer Hatcher, PhD, RN; Brenda Combs, CHES
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: ' African Americans suffer disparity from both cancer and cardiovascular disease. For example, the prevalence of hypertension among African Americans is the highest of any ethnic group in the world, and African Americans have the highest mortality rate of any racial or ethnic group in America for all cancers combined and for most major cancers. They are vulnerable to both cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer by virtue of having extremely high rates of risk factors, with the risk factors for these diseases being intricately connected. Use of social media and mobile phones to send health related text messages is an innovative strategy, presenting researchers with new opportunities to reach this vulnerable population with information and strategies to reduce these risk factors.'The purpose of this study was to test the impact and feasibility of a social media and text messaging intervention that promotes self-care resulting in the reduction of multiple CVD and cancer risk factors in African Americans.' Methods: We developed a library of intervention text messages, a message delivery protocol, Facebook page and blog that were culturally tailored and targeted for African Americans at risk for CVD and cancer. We conducted a one group, pre/post test intervention study with 39 African Americans over the age of 40 who were at risk for CVD and/or cancer as evidenced by having one or more modifiable risk factors (e.g. weight, blood pressure, cholesterol). We also conducted small group interviews post intervention to assess satisfaction with the intervention, and obtain usability and feasibility data. Participants were recruited from the community using a lay health worker. 'Data collection occurred at baseline and at three months post baseline and included: height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, body mass index, heart rate, HgA1c, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, comorbidities, current medications, heart health and heart disease knowledge, depression, quality of life, fatalism, and cancer screening activities.'' Results: Study participants were primarily female (69%), aged 58 '5 years, who were married (59%) and worked full time (56%). One third of the participants reported they were financially comfortable (36%). Roughly 77% had private/commercial insurance. Almost 13% of participants reported being current smokers. The majority of participants felt they were in 'Good' health (44%). Post intervention, participants experienced significant decreases in waist circumference (41 ''5 in vs 40 '5 in, p = 0.002), systolic blood pressure (147 ''24 vs 138 '20, p = 0.009), diastolic blood pressure (84, interquartile range [IQR] 79-93 vs 82, IQR 77-90, p = 0.02), total cholesterol (194 ''35 vs 173 ''31, p < 0.001), LDL levels (100 ''31 vs 86 ''29, p = 0.015), and HDL levels (51, IQR 35-71, vs 46, IQR 39-57, p = 0.006). Participants also reported increased heart healthy knowledge. In addition, five participants had colorectal cancer screening, two had prostate cancer screening, and four women had mammograms. Conclusion: Innovative methods are necessary to reduce cancer and cardiovascular risks, and to promote cancer screening and heart healthy activities in the African American population. The social media and text messaging intervention used in this study led to significant reductions in several risk areas, and promoted cancer screening. Future studies should incorporate these innovative strategies in promoting health in vulnerable populations.
Keywords:
cancer prevention; heart disease; health promotion
CINAHL Headings:
Health�Promotion--Methods; Social�Media; Neoplasms--Prevention�and Control
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST69
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleUsing Social Media and Text Messages to Promote Health in African-Americans: #HeartHealthyandCancerFreeen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Allison R.en
dc.contributor.authorHatcher, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorCombs, Brendaen
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Psien
dc.author.detailsAllison R. Jones, RN, allisonroenker@gmail.com; Jennifer Hatcher, PhD, RN; Brenda Combs, CHESen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602065-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: ' African Americans suffer disparity from both cancer and cardiovascular disease. For example, the prevalence of hypertension among African Americans is the highest of any ethnic group in the world, and African Americans have the highest mortality rate of any racial or ethnic group in America for all cancers combined and for most major cancers. They are vulnerable to both cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer by virtue of having extremely high rates of risk factors, with the risk factors for these diseases being intricately connected. Use of social media and mobile phones to send health related text messages is an innovative strategy, presenting researchers with new opportunities to reach this vulnerable population with information and strategies to reduce these risk factors.'The purpose of this study was to test the impact and feasibility of a social media and text messaging intervention that promotes self-care resulting in the reduction of multiple CVD and cancer risk factors in African Americans.' Methods: We developed a library of intervention text messages, a message delivery protocol, Facebook page and blog that were culturally tailored and targeted for African Americans at risk for CVD and cancer. We conducted a one group, pre/post test intervention study with 39 African Americans over the age of 40 who were at risk for CVD and/or cancer as evidenced by having one or more modifiable risk factors (e.g. weight, blood pressure, cholesterol). We also conducted small group interviews post intervention to assess satisfaction with the intervention, and obtain usability and feasibility data. Participants were recruited from the community using a lay health worker. 'Data collection occurred at baseline and at three months post baseline and included: height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, body mass index, heart rate, HgA1c, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, comorbidities, current medications, heart health and heart disease knowledge, depression, quality of life, fatalism, and cancer screening activities.'' Results: Study participants were primarily female (69%), aged 58 '5 years, who were married (59%) and worked full time (56%). One third of the participants reported they were financially comfortable (36%). Roughly 77% had private/commercial insurance. Almost 13% of participants reported being current smokers. The majority of participants felt they were in 'Good' health (44%). Post intervention, participants experienced significant decreases in waist circumference (41 ''5 in vs 40 '5 in, p = 0.002), systolic blood pressure (147 ''24 vs 138 '20, p = 0.009), diastolic blood pressure (84, interquartile range [IQR] 79-93 vs 82, IQR 77-90, p = 0.02), total cholesterol (194 ''35 vs 173 ''31, p < 0.001), LDL levels (100 ''31 vs 86 ''29, p = 0.015), and HDL levels (51, IQR 35-71, vs 46, IQR 39-57, p = 0.006). Participants also reported increased heart healthy knowledge. In addition, five participants had colorectal cancer screening, two had prostate cancer screening, and four women had mammograms. Conclusion: Innovative methods are necessary to reduce cancer and cardiovascular risks, and to promote cancer screening and heart healthy activities in the African American population. The social media and text messaging intervention used in this study led to significant reductions in several risk areas, and promoted cancer screening. Future studies should incorporate these innovative strategies in promoting health in vulnerable populations.en
dc.subjectcancer preventionen
dc.subjectheart diseaseen
dc.subjecthealth promotionen
dc.subject.cinahlHealth�Promotion--Methodsen
dc.subject.cinahlSocial�Mediaen
dc.subject.cinahlNeoplasms--Prevention�and Controlen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:03:05Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:03:05Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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