2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602066
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Factors Associated with Sleep Disturbance in Midlife Women
Author(s):
Jones, Holly J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Eta
Author Details:
Holly J. Jones, RN, CFNP, RNFA, holly.jones@ucsf.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this secondary analysis is to describe factors associated with sleep disturbance in late pre-menopause and peri-menopause. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of longitudinal data collected every 6 months (Time 1-8). A multiethnic sample of 158 women with a mean age of 48 (SD 2.20) remained in the study at 5 years (Time 8). Data extracted for this analysis include demographics, menopause status (determined by cycle regularity and urine FSH levels using STRAW criteria ' a staging system for ovarian aging) anthropometrics (height and weight).' Self-report data used for this analysis included: 1) Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), 2) perceived general health status (1 = excellent; 5 = poor) and 3) urinary symptoms checklist.' Results: The women were similar in demographics (age, parity, education, income) despite the racial diversity. The overall sample had poor sleep quality (mean PSQI > 5.0). Nighttime awakenings were prevalent in this sample. Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance indicated that women consistently reported 'having to get up to use the bathroom' and 'waking up in the middle of the night or early in the morning' over time. At Time 8, urinary leakage was the most frequently reported urinary symptom (50%) with significant race differences (c2' = 12.87, p = 0.001). Over 33% reported waking from sleep three or more times per week regardless of race. Nighttime urinary frequency (nocturia) was correlated with PSQI interrupted sleep (r = 0.53). A linear regression model was developed to account for the variance in nighttime awakenings. Menopause status (pre-menopausal rather than peri- or post-menopausal) was a significant contributor to frequent nighttime awakenings at Time 8. General health status and body mass index (BMI) were also significant contributors. Interestingly, race and age were not significant contributors to nighttime awakenings.' Conclusion: Sleep disturbance in the form of nighttime awakenings is a significant problem for women in midlife and these symptoms precede menopause. Nocturia was the most prevalent bladder symptom associated with nighttime awakenings. Our findings suggest that menopause stage is a significant factor in the occurrence of nocturia in late pre-menopause. Causation cannot be implied due to the nature of these analyses. Further research is needed to explore the relationship between menopause stage, nocturia and other, less frequent, reasons for nighttime awakenings. Urinary symptoms may be more relevant for women who experience menopause transition at an earlier age. Further research on this phenomenon may help to defray future healthcare costs and morbidity associated with nocturia as a cause of sleep disturbance in pre-menopausal women.
Keywords:
sleep disturbance; nocturia; menopause
CINAHL Headings:
Sleep�Disorders--Epidemiology; Perimenopausal Symptoms--Epidemiology; Menopause; Female; Middle Age
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST70
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleFactors Associated with Sleep Disturbance in Midlife Womenen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Holly J.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Etaen
dc.author.detailsHolly J. Jones, RN, CFNP, RNFA, holly.jones@ucsf.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602066-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this secondary analysis is to describe factors associated with sleep disturbance in late pre-menopause and peri-menopause. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of longitudinal data collected every 6 months (Time 1-8). A multiethnic sample of 158 women with a mean age of 48 (SD 2.20) remained in the study at 5 years (Time 8). Data extracted for this analysis include demographics, menopause status (determined by cycle regularity and urine FSH levels using STRAW criteria ' a staging system for ovarian aging) anthropometrics (height and weight).' Self-report data used for this analysis included: 1) Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), 2) perceived general health status (1 = excellent; 5 = poor) and 3) urinary symptoms checklist.' Results: The women were similar in demographics (age, parity, education, income) despite the racial diversity. The overall sample had poor sleep quality (mean PSQI > 5.0). Nighttime awakenings were prevalent in this sample. Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance indicated that women consistently reported 'having to get up to use the bathroom' and 'waking up in the middle of the night or early in the morning' over time. At Time 8, urinary leakage was the most frequently reported urinary symptom (50%) with significant race differences (c2' = 12.87, p = 0.001). Over 33% reported waking from sleep three or more times per week regardless of race. Nighttime urinary frequency (nocturia) was correlated with PSQI interrupted sleep (r = 0.53). A linear regression model was developed to account for the variance in nighttime awakenings. Menopause status (pre-menopausal rather than peri- or post-menopausal) was a significant contributor to frequent nighttime awakenings at Time 8. General health status and body mass index (BMI) were also significant contributors. Interestingly, race and age were not significant contributors to nighttime awakenings.' Conclusion: Sleep disturbance in the form of nighttime awakenings is a significant problem for women in midlife and these symptoms precede menopause. Nocturia was the most prevalent bladder symptom associated with nighttime awakenings. Our findings suggest that menopause stage is a significant factor in the occurrence of nocturia in late pre-menopause. Causation cannot be implied due to the nature of these analyses. Further research is needed to explore the relationship between menopause stage, nocturia and other, less frequent, reasons for nighttime awakenings. Urinary symptoms may be more relevant for women who experience menopause transition at an earlier age. Further research on this phenomenon may help to defray future healthcare costs and morbidity associated with nocturia as a cause of sleep disturbance in pre-menopausal women.en
dc.subjectsleep disturbanceen
dc.subjectnocturiaen
dc.subjectmenopauseen
dc.subject.cinahlSleep�Disorders--Epidemiologyen
dc.subject.cinahlPerimenopausal Symptoms--Epidemiologyen
dc.subject.cinahlMenopauseen
dc.subject.cinahlFemaleen
dc.subject.cinahlMiddle Ageen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:03:07Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:03:07Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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