Ethnic Differences in Vitamin D Levels and Comorbid Conditions in Low Income Childbearing Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602067
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Ethnic Differences in Vitamin D Levels and Comorbid Conditions in Low Income Childbearing Women
Author(s):
Woo, Jennifer
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Beta
Author Details:
Jennifer Woo, CNM, WHNP, jwoo2@luc.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with many chronic health conditions such as osteoporosis, hypertension, and diabetes.' Persons who are obese have low vitamin D levels.' Low vitamin D levels have also been observed in persons who have depression and have potential adverse effects in pregnancy.' 'African Americans have typically lower levels of vitamin D than Hispanics, but wanted to see if this held true in a predominantly Medicaid patient receiving care at an underserved health care center.' A descriptive study was conducted to determine if there are any ethnic differences in the levels of vitamin D and the co morbid conditions (hypertension, diabetes, prediabetes, obesity, and depression) and associations among these variables in a low income population (45% AA, 55 % Hispanic).'' Retrospective de-identified electronic medical record (EMR) data collected from June 2008 to June 2014 was utilized for this study. Inclusion criteria were: women aged 15 and 50 years of age, a serum vitamin D level in the EMR, and a current or previous diagnosis for pregnancy. Other variables included: age, ethnicity, type of insurance, body mass index, and comorbidities.'' The total sample size was 302 women who were classified using vitamin D guidelines as severely deficient (vitamin D <10 ng/ml), deficient (vitamin D level 11 to 19 ng/ml), insufficient (vitamin D level 20 to 30 ng/ml) and sufficient (vitamin D level >30).' Findings indicated that 12% were severely deficient, 47% were deficient, 29% were insufficient, and 12% were sufficient.' Although 88% of women had insufficient or deficient levels of vitamin D, only 5% had hypertension, 3% had diabetes,12% had prediabetes, 28% had depression and 16% had anxiety.'' The major finding of the present study is that even though the percentage of comorbidities was relatively low, women who had a vitamin D level < 30 had a higher frequency of having the comorbid condition.'' African American women were more likely to be vitamin D deficient and had lower levels of vitamin D, and were more likely to be depressed, have prediabetes and have obesity when compared with Hispanic women.' For example, 25% (34/138) of African American women had a severely deficient (vitamin D < 10ng/ml) level compared with 7% (12/164) of Hispanic women.' This study provides evidence for the prevalence of Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency in the African American and Hispanic patient population but also recognizes ethnic differences in vitamin D deficiency which should be considered when caring for this vulnerable patient population.
Keywords:
vitamin D; childbearing women; comorbid conditions
CINAHL Headings:
Vitamin�D�Deficiency--Epidemiology; Comorbidity
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST492
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleEthnic Differences in Vitamin D Levels and Comorbid Conditions in Low Income Childbearing Womenen
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Betaen
dc.author.detailsJennifer Woo, CNM, WHNP, jwoo2@luc.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602067-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with many chronic health conditions such as osteoporosis, hypertension, and diabetes.' Persons who are obese have low vitamin D levels.' Low vitamin D levels have also been observed in persons who have depression and have potential adverse effects in pregnancy.' 'African Americans have typically lower levels of vitamin D than Hispanics, but wanted to see if this held true in a predominantly Medicaid patient receiving care at an underserved health care center.' A descriptive study was conducted to determine if there are any ethnic differences in the levels of vitamin D and the co morbid conditions (hypertension, diabetes, prediabetes, obesity, and depression) and associations among these variables in a low income population (45% AA, 55 % Hispanic).'' Retrospective de-identified electronic medical record (EMR) data collected from June 2008 to June 2014 was utilized for this study. Inclusion criteria were: women aged 15 and 50 years of age, a serum vitamin D level in the EMR, and a current or previous diagnosis for pregnancy. Other variables included: age, ethnicity, type of insurance, body mass index, and comorbidities.'' The total sample size was 302 women who were classified using vitamin D guidelines as severely deficient (vitamin D <10 ng/ml), deficient (vitamin D level 11 to 19 ng/ml), insufficient (vitamin D level 20 to 30 ng/ml) and sufficient (vitamin D level >30).' Findings indicated that 12% were severely deficient, 47% were deficient, 29% were insufficient, and 12% were sufficient.' Although 88% of women had insufficient or deficient levels of vitamin D, only 5% had hypertension, 3% had diabetes,12% had prediabetes, 28% had depression and 16% had anxiety.'' The major finding of the present study is that even though the percentage of comorbidities was relatively low, women who had a vitamin D level < 30 had a higher frequency of having the comorbid condition.'' African American women were more likely to be vitamin D deficient and had lower levels of vitamin D, and were more likely to be depressed, have prediabetes and have obesity when compared with Hispanic women.' For example, 25% (34/138) of African American women had a severely deficient (vitamin D < 10ng/ml) level compared with 7% (12/164) of Hispanic women.' This study provides evidence for the prevalence of Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency in the African American and Hispanic patient population but also recognizes ethnic differences in vitamin D deficiency which should be considered when caring for this vulnerable patient population.en
dc.subjectvitamin Den
dc.subjectchildbearing womenen
dc.subjectcomorbid conditionsen
dc.subject.cinahlVitamin�D�Deficiency--Epidemiologyen
dc.subject.cinahlComorbidityen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:03:08Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:03:08Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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