Differential Impacts of Family Factors on Psychological Disorders between Latina and Latino Americans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602073
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Differential Impacts of Family Factors on Psychological Disorders between Latina and Latino Americans
Author(s):
Pappas, Cara L.; Ai, Amy L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Cara L. Pappas, ARNP, FNP, ACNP, CCRP, cpappas@fsu.edu; Amy L. Ai
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: As one of the two fastest growing minority groups in the United States (US), Latino Americans are expected to count for an estimated 30% of the national population in 2050 (US Census Bureau, 2010). Despite a rapidly growing Latina/o American population, few studies have investigated modifiable psychosocial factors that could protect Latina/os against major psychiatric disorders. The present gender-specific study explored psychosocial protective (Family Cohesion, Social Support, Religious Involvement, and Racial and Ethnic Identity) and risk factors (Negative Interaction) for major depressive disorder (MDD), general anxiety disorder (GAD), and suicidal ideation (SI) among Latinas participating in the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS). We expected that, among all psychosocial predictors, family relevant factors may stand out as one that would predict certain outcomes along the gender line, given their uniquely relevance to the family-centered collectivist Latino culture. Methods: The NLAAS is first population-based national mental health epidemiological survey of Latina/os and Asian Americans living in the United States, designed in coordination with and as a part of the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Studies (CPES) that includes NLAAS, the National Survey of American Life, and the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. We conducted three sets of logistic regressions, predicting three diagnoses based outcomes for 1,427 Latinas and 1,127 Latinos, respectively, identified in the NLAAS. These analyses followed preplanned steps: For each set of regression, Model 1 used known predictors as controls, including socio-demographics (Age,'Education Levels, Income and Employment) and acculturation variables (English Proficiency, US-born, Years in the US, Acculturation Stress, and discrimination). Model 2 added psychosocial risk and predictive factors beyond the known predictors. Results: For each outcome examined, psychosocial risk and protective factors produced a significantly better model fit in Model 1 than socio-demographic and acculturation variables known to predict mental health outcomes in Model 1. The Latina model showed that Negative Interactions was associated with increased likelihood of GAD and SI, whereas Family Cohesion appeared to be protective against GAD. The likelihood of SI was also predicated by Length of Stay in the US and perceived Discrimination. No protective psychosocial factors predicted MDD for which the likelihood increased with Length of Stay in the US and perceived Discrimination. The Latino model, however, showed that Negative Interactions with family members significantly predicted the likelihood of MDD. Acculturation Stress was associated with that of both GAD (alongside Income and US-born) and SI (alongside Length in the US and English Proficiency) Acculturation Stress. Other potential protective factors (social support, racial/ethnic identity, religious involvement) were not influential. Conclusion: As predominantly Catholics, the Latina/o population is characterized by the influence of collectivism in which family values play a central role in their ethnic identity and mental health. However, because traditional culture dictates the distinct gender role value in family, conflicts therein could predict different psychiatric disorders between Latinas and Latinos. Differential protective and risk factors in the two subgroups thus suggest that psychosocial assessment and intervention should address certain gender-specific components to improve mental health care and prevention for Latina/o Americans.
Keywords:
Latinas; mental health; cultural behaviors
MeSH:
Hispanic Americans; Health Behavior
CINAHL Headings:
Mental�Disorders--Risk Factors; Cultural Values
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INR15PST467
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleDifferential Impacts of Family Factors on Psychological Disorders between Latina and Latino Americansen
dc.contributor.authorPappas, Cara L.en
dc.contributor.authorAi, Amy L.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsCara L. Pappas, ARNP, FNP, ACNP, CCRP, cpappas@fsu.edu; Amy L. Aien
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602073-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: As one of the two fastest growing minority groups in the United States (US), Latino Americans are expected to count for an estimated 30% of the national population in 2050 (US Census Bureau, 2010). Despite a rapidly growing Latina/o American population, few studies have investigated modifiable psychosocial factors that could protect Latina/os against major psychiatric disorders. The present gender-specific study explored psychosocial protective (Family Cohesion, Social Support, Religious Involvement, and Racial and Ethnic Identity) and risk factors (Negative Interaction) for major depressive disorder (MDD), general anxiety disorder (GAD), and suicidal ideation (SI) among Latinas participating in the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS). We expected that, among all psychosocial predictors, family relevant factors may stand out as one that would predict certain outcomes along the gender line, given their uniquely relevance to the family-centered collectivist Latino culture. Methods: The NLAAS is first population-based national mental health epidemiological survey of Latina/os and Asian Americans living in the United States, designed in coordination with and as a part of the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Studies (CPES) that includes NLAAS, the National Survey of American Life, and the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. We conducted three sets of logistic regressions, predicting three diagnoses based outcomes for 1,427 Latinas and 1,127 Latinos, respectively, identified in the NLAAS. These analyses followed preplanned steps: For each set of regression, Model 1 used known predictors as controls, including socio-demographics (Age,'Education Levels, Income and Employment) and acculturation variables (English Proficiency, US-born, Years in the US, Acculturation Stress, and discrimination). Model 2 added psychosocial risk and predictive factors beyond the known predictors. Results: For each outcome examined, psychosocial risk and protective factors produced a significantly better model fit in Model 1 than socio-demographic and acculturation variables known to predict mental health outcomes in Model 1. The Latina model showed that Negative Interactions was associated with increased likelihood of GAD and SI, whereas Family Cohesion appeared to be protective against GAD. The likelihood of SI was also predicated by Length of Stay in the US and perceived Discrimination. No protective psychosocial factors predicted MDD for which the likelihood increased with Length of Stay in the US and perceived Discrimination. The Latino model, however, showed that Negative Interactions with family members significantly predicted the likelihood of MDD. Acculturation Stress was associated with that of both GAD (alongside Income and US-born) and SI (alongside Length in the US and English Proficiency) Acculturation Stress. Other potential protective factors (social support, racial/ethnic identity, religious involvement) were not influential. Conclusion: As predominantly Catholics, the Latina/o population is characterized by the influence of collectivism in which family values play a central role in their ethnic identity and mental health. However, because traditional culture dictates the distinct gender role value in family, conflicts therein could predict different psychiatric disorders between Latinas and Latinos. Differential protective and risk factors in the two subgroups thus suggest that psychosocial assessment and intervention should address certain gender-specific components to improve mental health care and prevention for Latina/o Americans.en
dc.subjectLatinasen
dc.subjectmental healthen
dc.subjectcultural behaviorsen
dc.subject.meshHispanic Americans; Health Behavioren
dc.subject.cinahlMental�Disorders--Risk Factors; Cultural Valuesen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:03:17Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:03:17Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.