2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602406
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Dance in Chronic Illness: A Systematic Review
Other Titles:
Enhancing Social Support for Self-Management [Symposium]
Author(s):
Angosta, Alona; Gatlin, Patricia K.; Serafica, Reimund; Gatlin, Patricia K.; Serafica, Reimund
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Kappa-at-Large
Author Details:
Alona Angosta, PhD, APRN, NP-C, alona.angosta@unlv.edu; Patricia K. Gatlin, PhD; Reimund Serafica, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Background: Dance is a social and physical activity. It has been used therapeutically for thousands of years and was thought to influence healing (Ritter & Low, 1996). Research in dance therapy has substantially increased in recent years particularly research related to cancer and among healthy individuals. However, it is unknown whether dance impacts health-related outcomes among individuals with chronic illness. Additionally, empirical studies need to be evaluated to determine the effectiveness of dance as evidence-based intervention. Purpose: This systematic review explored studies on dance and its impact in chronic illness. Methods: A literature search was conducted utilizing electronic searches using PubMed, EBSCO, and CINAHL databases. When the keywords 'dance,'� 'chronic illness,'� 'chronic disease,'� 'diabetes,' and 'cardiovascular disease'� were entered, there were 147 studies found. However, only 10 articles met the inclusion criteria of: (a) randomized control trial studies, (b) written in English, (c) published between 2005 and 2014. The Jadad scale (Berger & Alperson, 2009) was used for reporting the quality of the published studies. Three faculty researchers reviewed the studies separately and reached consensus using the scoring criteria. Findings: Based on the Jadad scoring system, the scores ranged from 7-11 out of 13 points. Dance had positive effects on quality of life (QOL), pain, fatigue, and functional capacity among individuals with fibromyalgia and congestive heart failure (Baptista, Villela, Jones, & Natour, 2012; Belardinelli, Lacalaprice, Ventrella, Volpe, & Faccenda, 2008; Carbonelli-Baeza et al., 2010; Kaltsatou, Kouidi, Anifanti, Douka, & Deligiannis, 2014). Dance had positive effects on QOL, balance, and physical function among individuals with depression, anxiety, and Parkinson's disease (Eyigor, Karapolat, Durmaz, Ibisoglu, & Cakir, 2009; Foster, Golden, Duncan, & Earhart, 2013; Hackney & Earhart, 2009; Mavrovouniotis, Argiriadou, & Papaioannou, 2010; Pinninger, Brown, & Thorsteinsson, 2012). Dance improved the blood pressures of individuals with hypertension (Maruf, Akinpelu, & Salako, 2013). Conclusions/Implications: This systematic review provides a summary of the current state of research on the effects of dance in chronic illness. This review suggests that dance may be a safe and effective intervention in improving QOL, physical function, blood pressure, fatigue, depression, and anxiety in different populations worldwide.
Keywords:
Dance; chronic illness; physical activity
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15G28
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEffects of Dance in Chronic Illness: A Systematic Reviewen
dc.title.alternativeEnhancing Social Support for Self-Management [Symposium]en
dc.contributor.authorAngosta, Alonaen
dc.contributor.authorGatlin, Patricia K.en
dc.contributor.authorSerafica, Reimunden
dc.contributor.authorGatlin, Patricia K.en
dc.contributor.authorSerafica, Reimunden
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Kappa-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsAlona Angosta, PhD, APRN, NP-C, alona.angosta@unlv.edu; Patricia K. Gatlin, PhD; Reimund Serafica, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602406en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Background: Dance is a social and physical activity. It has been used therapeutically for thousands of years and was thought to influence healing (Ritter & Low, 1996). Research in dance therapy has substantially increased in recent years particularly research related to cancer and among healthy individuals. However, it is unknown whether dance impacts health-related outcomes among individuals with chronic illness. Additionally, empirical studies need to be evaluated to determine the effectiveness of dance as evidence-based intervention. Purpose: This systematic review explored studies on dance and its impact in chronic illness. Methods: A literature search was conducted utilizing electronic searches using PubMed, EBSCO, and CINAHL databases. When the keywords 'dance,'� 'chronic illness,'� 'chronic disease,'� 'diabetes,' and 'cardiovascular disease'� were entered, there were 147 studies found. However, only 10 articles met the inclusion criteria of: (a) randomized control trial studies, (b) written in English, (c) published between 2005 and 2014. The Jadad scale (Berger & Alperson, 2009) was used for reporting the quality of the published studies. Three faculty researchers reviewed the studies separately and reached consensus using the scoring criteria. Findings: Based on the Jadad scoring system, the scores ranged from 7-11 out of 13 points. Dance had positive effects on quality of life (QOL), pain, fatigue, and functional capacity among individuals with fibromyalgia and congestive heart failure (Baptista, Villela, Jones, & Natour, 2012; Belardinelli, Lacalaprice, Ventrella, Volpe, & Faccenda, 2008; Carbonelli-Baeza et al., 2010; Kaltsatou, Kouidi, Anifanti, Douka, & Deligiannis, 2014). Dance had positive effects on QOL, balance, and physical function among individuals with depression, anxiety, and Parkinson's disease (Eyigor, Karapolat, Durmaz, Ibisoglu, & Cakir, 2009; Foster, Golden, Duncan, & Earhart, 2013; Hackney & Earhart, 2009; Mavrovouniotis, Argiriadou, & Papaioannou, 2010; Pinninger, Brown, & Thorsteinsson, 2012). Dance improved the blood pressures of individuals with hypertension (Maruf, Akinpelu, & Salako, 2013). Conclusions/Implications: This systematic review provides a summary of the current state of research on the effects of dance in chronic illness. This review suggests that dance may be a safe and effective intervention in improving QOL, physical function, blood pressure, fatigue, depression, and anxiety in different populations worldwide.en
dc.subjectDanceen
dc.subjectchronic illnessen
dc.subjectphysical activityen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:28:09Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:28:09Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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