Sustaining Nursing Diversity in Clinical Settings: Leadership and Minority Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602449
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sustaining Nursing Diversity in Clinical Settings: Leadership and Minority Nurses
Other Titles:
Cultivating and Sustaining a Diverse Nursing Workforce: A Plan for Nursing's Future [Symposium]
Author(s):
Hickman, Ronald
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Ronald Hickman, RN, ACNP-BC, rlh4@case.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Abstract: The alarmingly low representation of minority nurses in leadership positions poses significant public health concerns in the United States. As the demography of Americans continues to change, there has been minimal efforts to address the lack of diversity among its nurse leaders. Recognized for the potential to reduce health inequities, diversity in nursing leadership holds significant societal benefits for national and international communities. Prevalence of Minority Leaders: The presenter will discuss prevalence of minority nurses in leadership positions in the United States. In 2012, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that ethnic or racial minorities accounted for 37% of the American population and by 2043, ethnic and racially minority members will become a majority of the American population. Underrepresented racial minorities (e.g., Hispanic, Asian, African, and Native Americans) and men account for less than one-third of the American nursing workforce. According to the American Organization of Nurse Executives, less than 4% of American nurse executives were from an ethnic or racial minority group. National statistics on the prevalence of minority nurses in leadership positions will be presented. Known Barriers:  The presenter will discuss the known barriers that hinder racial minorities and other underrepresented individuals from assuming leadership positions in nursing. Nurses from underrepresented and disenfranchised groups face a sociocultural, institutional and systemic factors that contribute to discrimination. The discrimination that limits the numbers of underrepresented groups in nursing leadership is multilayered.  In the case of ethnic minorities, primary education is often inadequate thus limiting access to higher education or success in rigorous nursing programs. The number of minority nurses seeking graduate degrees and successfully graduating from those programs is on the decline.  The lack of ethnically diverse nurses with advanced degrees limits the available number of qualified diversity candidates in nursing leadership.  Minority nurses have reported limited opportunities for leadership in nursing and other report being placed in leadership positions with minimal preparation and support. Guided by the minority leadership model of Bessent and Fleming (2003), sociocultural and behavioral barriers will be discussed. Strategies Implemented:  The presenter will share examples of strategies used to enhance the  representation of minority nurses in leadership positions.  Strategies included targeted outreach efforts, faculty support and mentoring, quantitative assessment and evaluation measures, and recommendations for future programs.   Additionally targeted program that prepare, develop and nurture minority nurse leaders will be explored.  In particular the Leadership Enhancement and Development Project for Minority Nurses and the current and future Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s various nurse leadership programs.
Keywords:
Minority nurses; Clinical nursing leadership; Institutional racism
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15H14
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleSustaining Nursing Diversity in Clinical Settings: Leadership and Minority Nursesen
dc.title.alternativeCultivating and Sustaining a Diverse Nursing Workforce: A Plan for Nursing's Future [Symposium]en
dc.contributor.authorHickman, Ronalden
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsRonald Hickman, RN, ACNP-BC, rlh4@case.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602449en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Abstract: The alarmingly low representation of minority nurses in leadership positions poses significant public health concerns in the United States. As the demography of Americans continues to change, there has been minimal efforts to address the lack of diversity among its nurse leaders. Recognized for the potential to reduce health inequities, diversity in nursing leadership holds significant societal benefits for national and international communities. Prevalence of Minority Leaders: The presenter will discuss prevalence of minority nurses in leadership positions in the United States. In 2012, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that ethnic or racial minorities accounted for 37% of the American population and by 2043, ethnic and racially minority members will become a majority of the American population. Underrepresented racial minorities (e.g., Hispanic, Asian, African, and Native Americans) and men account for less than one-third of the American nursing workforce. According to the American Organization of Nurse Executives, less than 4% of American nurse executives were from an ethnic or racial minority group. National statistics on the prevalence of minority nurses in leadership positions will be presented. Known Barriers:  The presenter will discuss the known barriers that hinder racial minorities and other underrepresented individuals from assuming leadership positions in nursing. Nurses from underrepresented and disenfranchised groups face a sociocultural, institutional and systemic factors that contribute to discrimination. The discrimination that limits the numbers of underrepresented groups in nursing leadership is multilayered.  In the case of ethnic minorities, primary education is often inadequate thus limiting access to higher education or success in rigorous nursing programs. The number of minority nurses seeking graduate degrees and successfully graduating from those programs is on the decline.  The lack of ethnically diverse nurses with advanced degrees limits the available number of qualified diversity candidates in nursing leadership.  Minority nurses have reported limited opportunities for leadership in nursing and other report being placed in leadership positions with minimal preparation and support. Guided by the minority leadership model of Bessent and Fleming (2003), sociocultural and behavioral barriers will be discussed. Strategies Implemented:  The presenter will share examples of strategies used to enhance the  representation of minority nurses in leadership positions.  Strategies included targeted outreach efforts, faculty support and mentoring, quantitative assessment and evaluation measures, and recommendations for future programs.   Additionally targeted program that prepare, develop and nurture minority nurse leaders will be explored.  In particular the Leadership Enhancement and Development Project for Minority Nurses and the current and future Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s various nurse leadership programs.en
dc.subjectMinority nursesen
dc.subjectClinical nursing leadershipen
dc.subjectInstitutional racismen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:29:11Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:29:11Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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