The Role of Stress and Inflammation in Depression in Hispanics with Chronic Heart Failure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602452
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Role of Stress and Inflammation in Depression in Hispanics with Chronic Heart Failure
Other Titles:
Emotional Distress for those Afflicted with Cardiovascular Issues [Session]
Author(s):
Moughrabi, Samira
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Tau
Author Details:
Samira Moughrabi, RN, CNS, Smoughrabi01@gmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: Introduction:  Depression is a common comorbidity in heart failure (HF) and is commonly associated with increased inflammation leading to poor outcomes. Low socioeconomic status (SES) and stress are common in Hispanics but have not adequately been described in those with HF.  The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine depression and its relationship with socioeconomic status, stress, and inflammation in Hispanics with HF. Methods:  55 patients (71.62+/-11.33; 74.5% male; 31% Hispanic) with HF were assessed for their perceived stress (PS) using PSS, CRP serum levels, and education level and yearly income as indices of SES.  Descriptive data and t-test and chi-square were used to compare Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites (NHW) on sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and linear multiple regression to assess the relationship between depression, ethnicity, PS, CRP, and SES. Results:  Hispanics were younger and had lower education and income levels than NHW. No significant difference was found between both groups in depression and stress scores, and CRP levels. Independent of age, gender, NYHA class, BMI, education levels, and perceived stress (B=0.39, p=0.009) and marital status (B=0.37, p=0.049) predicted depression scores. When yearly income replaced education level in the multiple regression model, only PS (B=0.43, p=0.003) predicted depression. Hispanic ethnicity and CRP did not contribute to the variation of depression in both models. Conclusion:  This study shows the importance of stress in depression. Sources of stress in HF should be further explored to develop interventions that effectively reduce stress regardless of patient’s et
Keywords:
Heart failure; Depression; Inflammation
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15E18
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Role of Stress and Inflammation in Depression in Hispanics with Chronic Heart Failureen
dc.title.alternativeEmotional Distress for those Afflicted with Cardiovascular Issues [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorMoughrabi, Samiraen
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Tauen
dc.author.detailsSamira Moughrabi, RN, CNS, Smoughrabi01@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602452en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: Introduction:  Depression is a common comorbidity in heart failure (HF) and is commonly associated with increased inflammation leading to poor outcomes. Low socioeconomic status (SES) and stress are common in Hispanics but have not adequately been described in those with HF.  The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine depression and its relationship with socioeconomic status, stress, and inflammation in Hispanics with HF. Methods:  55 patients (71.62+/-11.33; 74.5% male; 31% Hispanic) with HF were assessed for their perceived stress (PS) using PSS, CRP serum levels, and education level and yearly income as indices of SES.  Descriptive data and t-test and chi-square were used to compare Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites (NHW) on sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and linear multiple regression to assess the relationship between depression, ethnicity, PS, CRP, and SES. Results:  Hispanics were younger and had lower education and income levels than NHW. No significant difference was found between both groups in depression and stress scores, and CRP levels. Independent of age, gender, NYHA class, BMI, education levels, and perceived stress (B=0.39, p=0.009) and marital status (B=0.37, p=0.049) predicted depression scores. When yearly income replaced education level in the multiple regression model, only PS (B=0.43, p=0.003) predicted depression. Hispanic ethnicity and CRP did not contribute to the variation of depression in both models. Conclusion:  This study shows the importance of stress in depression. Sources of stress in HF should be further explored to develop interventions that effectively reduce stress regardless of patient’s eten
dc.subjectHeart failureen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectInflammationen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:29:16Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:29:16Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.