Effects of the Simulation Education Program to Train Life-Saving Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602463
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Effects of the Simulation Education Program to Train Life-Saving Nurses
Author(s):
Mitoma, Rika; Yamauchi, Toyoaki; Yamauchi, Toyoaki
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Rika Mitoma, RN, mitoma@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Toyoaki Yamauchi, FNP, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: PURPOSE: Five programs have been developed with the aim of educating nurses in the first three years of their career, nurturing professionals who are able to predict sudden changes in the patient’s condition, who can deal appropriately with these sudden changes, and who can play the role of both a leader and a team member in response to such situations. The programs that have been developed are planned so that a new nurse can participate in the first program and, after passing the relevant exams, he/she will then proceed to the next program. The purpose of this study is to verify the efficacy of the five educational programs that have been developed.  METHOD: A simulation exam covering the entire contents of the five educational programs has been conducted in two groups: a trained group of 114 subjects who have completed the five educational programs developed, and a non-trained group of 58 subjects who have not participated in the educational programs. Subjects who have participated step-by-step in the five educational programs and have successfully passed both the knowledge and practical skills tests of each program are eligible to take part in the simulation exam. The simulation exam was evaluated using a checklist of 34 items (with a perfect score of 34), including the following four evaluation criteria of the five educational programs: “observation of premonitory symptoms of sudden changes in condition from the aspect of ABCDE,” “request for backup and report by SBAR,” “emergency measures necessary for patients,” and “participant’s role as a leader or as a team member.” RESULTS: In the score of the skill test, a significant difference between the two groups (p<0.05) was observed. There was a median value of 31.0 for the trained group, and a median value of 29.0 for the non-trained group. For the four items of the checklist, “observation of the movement of the thorax,” “confirmation of the presence or absence of fever,” “auscultation of breath sounds,” and “preparation for intubation,” a significant relationship (p<0.05) was observed between experience of participating in the educational programs and the level of ability to implement the skills. The number of subjects who were able to conduct the above four tasks was higher in the trained group than in the non-trained group. CONCLUSION: The five programs that have been developed can be considered effective in the professional education of nurses who are able to predict sudden changes in the patient’s condition, who can deal appropriately with these sudden changes, and who can play the role of both a leader and a team member in response to such situations.
Keywords:
clinical simulation training; educational program; nursing education
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15CL2.57
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleEffects of the Simulation Education Program to Train Life-Saving Nursesen
dc.contributor.authorMitoma, Rikaen
dc.contributor.authorYamauchi, Toyoakien
dc.contributor.authorYamauchi, Toyoakien
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsRika Mitoma, RN, mitoma@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Toyoaki Yamauchi, FNP, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602463en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: PURPOSE: Five programs have been developed with the aim of educating nurses in the first three years of their career, nurturing professionals who are able to predict sudden changes in the patient’s condition, who can deal appropriately with these sudden changes, and who can play the role of both a leader and a team member in response to such situations. The programs that have been developed are planned so that a new nurse can participate in the first program and, after passing the relevant exams, he/she will then proceed to the next program. The purpose of this study is to verify the efficacy of the five educational programs that have been developed.  METHOD: A simulation exam covering the entire contents of the five educational programs has been conducted in two groups: a trained group of 114 subjects who have completed the five educational programs developed, and a non-trained group of 58 subjects who have not participated in the educational programs. Subjects who have participated step-by-step in the five educational programs and have successfully passed both the knowledge and practical skills tests of each program are eligible to take part in the simulation exam. The simulation exam was evaluated using a checklist of 34 items (with a perfect score of 34), including the following four evaluation criteria of the five educational programs: “observation of premonitory symptoms of sudden changes in condition from the aspect of ABCDE,” “request for backup and report by SBAR,” “emergency measures necessary for patients,” and “participant’s role as a leader or as a team member.” RESULTS: In the score of the skill test, a significant difference between the two groups (p<0.05) was observed. There was a median value of 31.0 for the trained group, and a median value of 29.0 for the non-trained group. For the four items of the checklist, “observation of the movement of the thorax,” “confirmation of the presence or absence of fever,” “auscultation of breath sounds,” and “preparation for intubation,” a significant relationship (p<0.05) was observed between experience of participating in the educational programs and the level of ability to implement the skills. The number of subjects who were able to conduct the above four tasks was higher in the trained group than in the non-trained group. CONCLUSION: The five programs that have been developed can be considered effective in the professional education of nurses who are able to predict sudden changes in the patient’s condition, who can deal appropriately with these sudden changes, and who can play the role of both a leader and a team member in response to such situations.en
dc.subjectclinical simulation trainingen
dc.subjecteducational programen
dc.subjectnursing educationen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:29:30Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:29:30Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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