The Effects of the Clinical Learning Environment on Japanese Nursing Instructors' Support in Facilitating Students' Metacognition: A Comparison between University and Vocational School Instructors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602466
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
The Effects of the Clinical Learning Environment on Japanese Nursing Instructors' Support in Facilitating Students' Metacognition: A Comparison between University and Vocational School Instructors
Author(s):
Hosoda, Yasuko; Doi, Yoshiko; Katayama, Yukari; Negishi, Mayumi; Doi, Yoshiko; Katayama, Yukari; Negishi, Mayumi
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Tau Nu
Author Details:
Yasuko Hosoda, RN, hosoday@nursing.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Yoshiko Doi, RN; Yukari Katayama, RN; Mayumi Negishi, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and Sunday, November 8, 2015: Aim:This study aimed to compare university and vocational school instructors regarding the effects of the clinical learning environment on Japanese nursing instructors’ support in facilitating students’ metacognition. Background:Metacognitive knowledge and activities are valued in clinical learning. The clinical learning environment helps determine the quality of the clinical experience of the nursing student. It is necessary to investigate how educational activity can promote students’ metacognition in the clinical learning environment. Methods: Participants were 145 university instructors (67.1% response rate) and 110 vocational school instructors (56.4% response rate) from nursing programs in Japan. The Clinical Learning Environment Diagnostic Inventory—which measures the affective, perceptual, symbolic, behavioral, and reflective aspects of the clinical learning environment—and a questionnaire regarding support that facilitates students’ metacognition—consisting of items to measure metacognitive knowledge and metacognitive activities—were administered. The data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics to compare the clinical learning environment and the support to facilitate students’ metacognition between two groups (university instructors and vocational school instructors). Simultaneous analysis of multiple groups was conducted between the two groups using AMOS. The study was approved by the Ethical Review Board of School of Nursing, Osaka Prefecture University, Japan. Outcomes: The results indicated that university instructors were significantly higher than the vocational school instructors in all subscales for the Clinical Learning Environment Diagnostic Inventory. The university instructors had higher values of support that facilitates students’ metacognitive knowledge for students’ problem solving compared to the vocational school instructors. In structural equation models with latent variables, “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive knowledge” was influenced by the “clinical learning environment” as perceived by the instructors, and “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive activities” was affected by “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive knowledge.” Multiple-group structural equation modeling between the two groups was tested with equality constraints placed on each path coefficient. The fit indices for the hypothetical model were goodness-of-fit index = .904, adjusted goodness-of-fit index = .867, and root mean square error of approximation = .037. The standardized parameter estimates of path coefficients indicating degrees of influence of the “clinical learning environment” on “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive knowledge” were .42 for the university instructors and .56 for the vocational school instructors. The critical ratio for the difference between these parameters for the two groups was not significantly different. The path coefficients (standardized parameter estimates) of “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive knowledge” on “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive activities” were .88 for the university instructors and .96 for the vocational school instructors. The critical ratio for the difference between these parameters of the two groups was significantly different (P < 0.05). Implications:Results revealed that the “clinical learning environment” affected the instructors’ “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive knowledge, ”which in turn affected the “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive activities.” These effects were seen in both university instructors and vocational school instructors. In particular, the vocational school instructors seemed to have a more consistent effect on the clinical learning environment regarding their support to facilitate students’ metacognition. It is assumed that enhancing the clinical learning environment will lead to the instructors’ support facilitating students’ metacognition.
Keywords:
clinical learning environment; nursing instructor; metacognition
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15SC1.16
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleThe Effects of the Clinical Learning Environment on Japanese Nursing Instructors' Support in Facilitating Students' Metacognition: A Comparison between University and Vocational School Instructorsen
dc.contributor.authorHosoda, Yasukoen
dc.contributor.authorDoi, Yoshikoen
dc.contributor.authorKatayama, Yukarien
dc.contributor.authorNegishi, Mayumien
dc.contributor.authorDoi, Yoshikoen
dc.contributor.authorKatayama, Yukarien
dc.contributor.authorNegishi, Mayumien
dc.contributor.departmentTau Nuen
dc.author.detailsYasuko Hosoda, RN, hosoday@nursing.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Yoshiko Doi, RN; Yukari Katayama, RN; Mayumi Negishi, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602466en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and Sunday, November 8, 2015: Aim:This study aimed to compare university and vocational school instructors regarding the effects of the clinical learning environment on Japanese nursing instructors’ support in facilitating students’ metacognition. Background:Metacognitive knowledge and activities are valued in clinical learning. The clinical learning environment helps determine the quality of the clinical experience of the nursing student. It is necessary to investigate how educational activity can promote students’ metacognition in the clinical learning environment. Methods: Participants were 145 university instructors (67.1% response rate) and 110 vocational school instructors (56.4% response rate) from nursing programs in Japan. The Clinical Learning Environment Diagnostic Inventory—which measures the affective, perceptual, symbolic, behavioral, and reflective aspects of the clinical learning environment—and a questionnaire regarding support that facilitates students’ metacognition—consisting of items to measure metacognitive knowledge and metacognitive activities—were administered. The data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics to compare the clinical learning environment and the support to facilitate students’ metacognition between two groups (university instructors and vocational school instructors). Simultaneous analysis of multiple groups was conducted between the two groups using AMOS. The study was approved by the Ethical Review Board of School of Nursing, Osaka Prefecture University, Japan. Outcomes: The results indicated that university instructors were significantly higher than the vocational school instructors in all subscales for the Clinical Learning Environment Diagnostic Inventory. The university instructors had higher values of support that facilitates students’ metacognitive knowledge for students’ problem solving compared to the vocational school instructors. In structural equation models with latent variables, “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive knowledge” was influenced by the “clinical learning environment” as perceived by the instructors, and “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive activities” was affected by “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive knowledge.” Multiple-group structural equation modeling between the two groups was tested with equality constraints placed on each path coefficient. The fit indices for the hypothetical model were goodness-of-fit index = .904, adjusted goodness-of-fit index = .867, and root mean square error of approximation = .037. The standardized parameter estimates of path coefficients indicating degrees of influence of the “clinical learning environment” on “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive knowledge” were .42 for the university instructors and .56 for the vocational school instructors. The critical ratio for the difference between these parameters for the two groups was not significantly different. The path coefficients (standardized parameter estimates) of “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive knowledge” on “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive activities” were .88 for the university instructors and .96 for the vocational school instructors. The critical ratio for the difference between these parameters of the two groups was significantly different (P < 0.05). Implications:Results revealed that the “clinical learning environment” affected the instructors’ “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive knowledge, ”which in turn affected the “support that facilitates students’ metacognitive activities.” These effects were seen in both university instructors and vocational school instructors. In particular, the vocational school instructors seemed to have a more consistent effect on the clinical learning environment regarding their support to facilitate students’ metacognition. It is assumed that enhancing the clinical learning environment will lead to the instructors’ support facilitating students’ metacognition.en
dc.subjectclinical learning environmenten
dc.subjectnursing instructoren
dc.subjectmetacognitionen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:29:34Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:29:34Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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