Professionalism in the Clinical Setting: How Do We Uphold the Values of Our Professions?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602517
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Professionalism in the Clinical Setting: How Do We Uphold the Values of Our Professions?
Author(s):
Hammond-Ritschard, Elizabeth; Serembus, Joanne Farley
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Tau-at-Large
Author Details:
Elizabeth Hammond-Ritschard, MSN, RN, er446@drexel.edu; Joanne Farley Serembus, RN, CCRN, CNE
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Title: Professionalism in the clinical setting—how do we uphold the values of our professions? As we move forward with new and innovated technology, we are meeting the needs of our patients, but there is one area which has not progressed; role modeling of professionalism in the clinical setting. The primary purpose for clinical is to provide hands on opportunities to nursing students. This enables them to develop patient care skills under the guidance of well experienced nurses. During this time they are also exposed to accepted behavior and values of the profession. Sadly, students report that their clinical rotations do not foster growth as a result of incivility imposed by professional nurses. We all have taken the Nightingale Pledge, but do we truly uphold this pledge when it comes to profession and shaping the future generation of nurses? Has nursing become so desensitized to acts of incivility that students have become victims during what is thought to be a learning environment? This presentation will detail an assignment in a BSN leadership course in which students described a personal incident involving incivility in the clinical setting. The purpose of the assignment was to have the students reflect on such an incident, identify a leadership style, change theory, and communication style that could be used by them in future situations. The first-hand accounts described by students were unexpected and eye-opening. Faculty took this rich qualitative data and decided to look for relevant themes. The main themes as well as sub-themes discovered will be discussed in addition to faculty strategies aimed at helping students end the cycle of incivility.
Keywords:
Professionalism in Nursing; Role Modeling; Faculty Student Relationships
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15LD2.18
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleProfessionalism in the Clinical Setting: How Do We Uphold the Values of Our Professions?en
dc.contributor.authorHammond-Ritschard, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorSerembus, Joanne Farleyen
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Tau-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Hammond-Ritschard, MSN, RN, er446@drexel.edu; Joanne Farley Serembus, RN, CCRN, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602517en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Title: Professionalism in the clinical setting—how do we uphold the values of our professions? As we move forward with new and innovated technology, we are meeting the needs of our patients, but there is one area which has not progressed; role modeling of professionalism in the clinical setting. The primary purpose for clinical is to provide hands on opportunities to nursing students. This enables them to develop patient care skills under the guidance of well experienced nurses. During this time they are also exposed to accepted behavior and values of the profession. Sadly, students report that their clinical rotations do not foster growth as a result of incivility imposed by professional nurses. We all have taken the Nightingale Pledge, but do we truly uphold this pledge when it comes to profession and shaping the future generation of nurses? Has nursing become so desensitized to acts of incivility that students have become victims during what is thought to be a learning environment? This presentation will detail an assignment in a BSN leadership course in which students described a personal incident involving incivility in the clinical setting. The purpose of the assignment was to have the students reflect on such an incident, identify a leadership style, change theory, and communication style that could be used by them in future situations. The first-hand accounts described by students were unexpected and eye-opening. Faculty took this rich qualitative data and decided to look for relevant themes. The main themes as well as sub-themes discovered will be discussed in addition to faculty strategies aimed at helping students end the cycle of incivility.en
dc.subjectProfessionalism in Nursingen
dc.subjectRole Modelingen
dc.subjectFaculty Student Relationshipsen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:30:45Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:30:45Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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