End-Tidal Capnography Use by Registered Nurses in a Rural Appalachian Acute Care Hospital

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602532
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
End-Tidal Capnography Use by Registered Nurses in a Rural Appalachian Acute Care Hospital
Author(s):
Leslie, Andrew James
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Andrew James Leslie, RN, PHRN, CEN, alesli3@wgu.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and Sunday, November 8, 2015: Purpose: The utilization of capnography is an important part of care to patients in the emergency department or intensive care unit with respiratory complaints. The researcher personally noted nurses not routinely using this technology, even though the capabilities were made available to them. This research project was developed to answer the research question: “What are the perceived barriers that registered nurses in a rural Pennsylvanian hospital have to the utilization of end-tidal capnography? Methods: The study employed an anonymous, researcher-developed data collection tool which was made available to 25 nurses in the emergency department and intensive care unit at a rural acute care hospital in northwest Pennsylvania. The data collection tool consisted of two demographic questions, asking what academic nursing degree the respondent held, and how long they have practiced nursing. The data collection tool then had eight Likert-type items related to the nurse's perceived barriers of capnography use. The data was then tabulated and analyzed using quantitative descriptive statistics. Results: There were 12 nurses who completed the study, indicating a 48% response rate.  The data obtained from this research project revealed that the participants indicated that they knew how to use the capnography equipment available at the study hospital.  The participants were divided about receiving adequate training on the indications and clinical significance of capnography.  Approximately 49% answered that they had received adequate training, and 49% answered that they have not received adequate training on the indications and clinical significance of capnography.  However, 67% of the study participants reported that they know the indications of capnography and what the results mean; likewise, 92% of respondents stated that they do understand the clinical significance that capnography has.  The Likert items which asked if the nurses had current knowledge of capnography were answered in the affirmative, yet half of the participants reported not having adequate training on the subject.  The respondents indicated that they do seek out new technologies, and that they guide their practice because of evidence-based research.  However, they also indicated that while they do understand the clinical significance of end-tidal capnography, they have not received adequate training on the subject.   Conclusion: The research project answered the research question of what are the perceived barriers that registered nurses in a rural Pennsylvanian hospital have to the utilization of end-tidal capnography?  The data that was collected indicated that the nurses in the study hospital expressed a learning deficit related to the theory of capnography and the impact it has in patient care, and a lack of knowledge related to the proper use of the capnography equipment available at the study hospital.  However, the difference in data with the participants expressing that the majority understands the clinical significance of end-tidal capnography requires further study to determine the perceived learning deficits the nurses have.  The research project has the potential to influence evidence-based nursing practice regarding the use of capnography in patients with respiratory difficulty in this acute care hospital.
Keywords:
Capnography; Rural critical care nursing; Practice barriers
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15RS1.51
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleEnd-Tidal Capnography Use by Registered Nurses in a Rural Appalachian Acute Care Hospitalen
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, Andrew Jamesen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsAndrew James Leslie, RN, PHRN, CEN, alesli3@wgu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602532en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and Sunday, November 8, 2015: Purpose: The utilization of capnography is an important part of care to patients in the emergency department or intensive care unit with respiratory complaints. The researcher personally noted nurses not routinely using this technology, even though the capabilities were made available to them. This research project was developed to answer the research question: “What are the perceived barriers that registered nurses in a rural Pennsylvanian hospital have to the utilization of end-tidal capnography? Methods: The study employed an anonymous, researcher-developed data collection tool which was made available to 25 nurses in the emergency department and intensive care unit at a rural acute care hospital in northwest Pennsylvania. The data collection tool consisted of two demographic questions, asking what academic nursing degree the respondent held, and how long they have practiced nursing. The data collection tool then had eight Likert-type items related to the nurse's perceived barriers of capnography use. The data was then tabulated and analyzed using quantitative descriptive statistics. Results: There were 12 nurses who completed the study, indicating a 48% response rate.  The data obtained from this research project revealed that the participants indicated that they knew how to use the capnography equipment available at the study hospital.  The participants were divided about receiving adequate training on the indications and clinical significance of capnography.  Approximately 49% answered that they had received adequate training, and 49% answered that they have not received adequate training on the indications and clinical significance of capnography.  However, 67% of the study participants reported that they know the indications of capnography and what the results mean; likewise, 92% of respondents stated that they do understand the clinical significance that capnography has.  The Likert items which asked if the nurses had current knowledge of capnography were answered in the affirmative, yet half of the participants reported not having adequate training on the subject.  The respondents indicated that they do seek out new technologies, and that they guide their practice because of evidence-based research.  However, they also indicated that while they do understand the clinical significance of end-tidal capnography, they have not received adequate training on the subject.   Conclusion: The research project answered the research question of what are the perceived barriers that registered nurses in a rural Pennsylvanian hospital have to the utilization of end-tidal capnography?  The data that was collected indicated that the nurses in the study hospital expressed a learning deficit related to the theory of capnography and the impact it has in patient care, and a lack of knowledge related to the proper use of the capnography equipment available at the study hospital.  However, the difference in data with the participants expressing that the majority understands the clinical significance of end-tidal capnography requires further study to determine the perceived learning deficits the nurses have.  The research project has the potential to influence evidence-based nursing practice regarding the use of capnography in patients with respiratory difficulty in this acute care hospital.en
dc.subjectCapnographyen
dc.subjectRural critical care nursingen
dc.subjectPractice barriersen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:31:05Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:31:05Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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