2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602544
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Nursing Simulation: It's Not Just for Skills Anymore
Author(s):
Campbell, William T.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Eta
Author Details:
William T. Campbell, EdD, MS, RN, wtcampbell@salisbury.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Ever since Mrs. Chase in 1911 nursing education has utilized the mannequin for skills. The earliest mannequins in nursing were used for transfers, positioning, and other non-invasive skills & learning activities. Following the lead of medicine, especially anesthesiology, they were now being used for the training of nurses instead of doctors. The mannequins used were very low fidelity and were literally dolls, but quickly became useful for skills demonstrations, practice, and testing while maintaining the important patient safety. They were often just skills trainers or partial torsos with an orifice or lumen to accommodate a tube’s insertion. Computers and simulation changed that. This time following the lead of the airline industry, aeronautics, and the military computerized nursing simulation moved away from the screen and would begin to incorporate the mannequin in the role of the patient. Again, with patient safety as the ultimate goal, education of nurses was the desired outcome. The fidelity level of the mannequins began to increase, but the activities were still basic skills instruction. Even with the higher fidelity mannequins and the technological advancement of simulation many nursing instructors remain at the skills level of simulation because that is how they learned and where they are comfortable. Tradition is ingrained and often difficult to overcome. Simulation must move beyond Mrs. Chase. My Nursing Care of Children & Adolescents course utilizes 3 days of simulation in a 12 day clinical rotation. Twenty-five percent (and up to 50%) of clinical being simulation maintains a consistent level of clinical education & preparation and maintains competency for the licensure exam & for employment (Hayden, Smiley, Alexander, Kardong-Edgren, & Jeffries, 2014). The simulations increase in complexity as the semester progresses. The simulations have basic skills, but go far beyond. The simulations, scenarios, nurse’s reports, and physician’s orders are designed to introduce questions and situations that will demand interdisciplinary collaboration, reinforcement of the knowledge of medications using available resources, setting priorities, developing leadership skills, building team work, delegating interventions, and the application of critical thinking. The simulations are designed to be a learning experience and not an assessment of the student. By removing instructor grading the stress level is diminished and learning increases in a more positive environment. This session will describe tasks & orders inserted into the simulation scenarios to encourage a higher level of learning. It will also report the students’ comments and reactions.
Keywords:
nursing education; Nursing simulation
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15LD2.5
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleNursing Simulation: It's Not Just for Skills Anymoreen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, William T.en
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Etaen
dc.author.detailsWilliam T. Campbell, EdD, MS, RN, wtcampbell@salisbury.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602544en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Ever since Mrs. Chase in 1911 nursing education has utilized the mannequin for skills. The earliest mannequins in nursing were used for transfers, positioning, and other non-invasive skills & learning activities. Following the lead of medicine, especially anesthesiology, they were now being used for the training of nurses instead of doctors. The mannequins used were very low fidelity and were literally dolls, but quickly became useful for skills demonstrations, practice, and testing while maintaining the important patient safety. They were often just skills trainers or partial torsos with an orifice or lumen to accommodate a tube’s insertion. Computers and simulation changed that. This time following the lead of the airline industry, aeronautics, and the military computerized nursing simulation moved away from the screen and would begin to incorporate the mannequin in the role of the patient. Again, with patient safety as the ultimate goal, education of nurses was the desired outcome. The fidelity level of the mannequins began to increase, but the activities were still basic skills instruction. Even with the higher fidelity mannequins and the technological advancement of simulation many nursing instructors remain at the skills level of simulation because that is how they learned and where they are comfortable. Tradition is ingrained and often difficult to overcome. Simulation must move beyond Mrs. Chase. My Nursing Care of Children & Adolescents course utilizes 3 days of simulation in a 12 day clinical rotation. Twenty-five percent (and up to 50%) of clinical being simulation maintains a consistent level of clinical education & preparation and maintains competency for the licensure exam & for employment (Hayden, Smiley, Alexander, Kardong-Edgren, & Jeffries, 2014). The simulations increase in complexity as the semester progresses. The simulations have basic skills, but go far beyond. The simulations, scenarios, nurse’s reports, and physician’s orders are designed to introduce questions and situations that will demand interdisciplinary collaboration, reinforcement of the knowledge of medications using available resources, setting priorities, developing leadership skills, building team work, delegating interventions, and the application of critical thinking. The simulations are designed to be a learning experience and not an assessment of the student. By removing instructor grading the stress level is diminished and learning increases in a more positive environment. This session will describe tasks & orders inserted into the simulation scenarios to encourage a higher level of learning. It will also report the students’ comments and reactions.en
dc.subjectnursing educationen
dc.subjectNursing simulationen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:31:23Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:31:23Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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