Reducing the Disparities in Breastfeeding Initiation among Urban Adolescent Mothers through a Prenatal Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602580
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Reducing the Disparities in Breastfeeding Initiation among Urban Adolescent Mothers through a Prenatal Intervention
Author(s):
El Harit, Jamie Lynn
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Epsilon
Author Details:
Jamie Lynn El Harit, RN, ASQ, CSSBB, jamie.elharit@valpo.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Breastfeeding has been correlated with many health benefits to both infants and mothers. According to Healthy People 2020, infants who are breastfed have improved nutritional, immunological, developmental, and social outcomes. Despite the benefits of breastfeeding and the focused international efforts to increase levels of breastfeeding, adolescents remain largely unaware (Spear, 2006). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC, 2013) adolescents have among the lowest levels of breastfeeding. This is further impacted by socioeconomic status and race (Apostolakis-Kyrus, Valentine, & DeFranco, 2013; CDC, 2013). Disparities thus exist in breastfeeding initiation and potential health outcomes to those populations most at risk for disease. Adolescent mothers are uneducated about the health benefits and protections of breast milk and this population is often overlooked in the promotion and protection of breastfeeding (Hunter, 2012; Moran, Dykes, Burt, & Shuck, 2006). This evidence-based practice (EBP) project aims to reduce the disparities of breast feeding initiation among a group of adolescent pregnant women in an inner city high school by increasing breast feeding self-efficacy and breast feeding intention. After an exhaustive search in the major databases including CINAHL, ProQuest, MEDLINE, and PsychInfo eleven articles were chosen for inclusion in the development of the EBP solution. Social Cognitive Theory is the framework that is utilized in the development of the EBP solution.  The EBP intervention includes psychological and environmental determinants of behavior, observational learning, self-regulation, and moral disengagement. The EBP implementation will include a series of three group learning activities utilizing an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) and two peer breast feeding counselors and will focus on increasing self-efficacy and intention through various educational techniques focusing on the benefits of breast feeding, common difficulties, and mechanisms to overcome barriers. The combined use of various techniques to engage adolescent learners in improving their self-efficacy will be utilized with a team approach, during the second trimester of pregnancy, over the course of three lunch-time educational sessions. Techniques include didactic, discussion, hands-on, demonstration, and literature. Support by a lactation expert will continue through to delivery within their school environment on a weekly basis. The Prenatal Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale will be utilized to measure pre and post-intervention. The Breast feeding Self Efficacy-Short Form (BFSE-SF)will be administered postpartum to determine postpartum self-efficacy as a mechanism to determine the impact of the intervention. Additionally, stated feeding intention will be collected pre and post intervention, as well as self-report data on initiation and continuation of any breast feeding during a telephone interview conducted between two to four weeks postpartum.
Keywords:
breastfeeding; self-efficacy; breastfeeding initiation
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15EB2.10
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleReducing the Disparities in Breastfeeding Initiation among Urban Adolescent Mothers through a Prenatal Interventionen
dc.contributor.authorEl Harit, Jamie Lynnen
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Epsilonen
dc.author.detailsJamie Lynn El Harit, RN, ASQ, CSSBB, jamie.elharit@valpo.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602580en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Breastfeeding has been correlated with many health benefits to both infants and mothers. According to Healthy People 2020, infants who are breastfed have improved nutritional, immunological, developmental, and social outcomes. Despite the benefits of breastfeeding and the focused international efforts to increase levels of breastfeeding, adolescents remain largely unaware (Spear, 2006). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC, 2013) adolescents have among the lowest levels of breastfeeding. This is further impacted by socioeconomic status and race (Apostolakis-Kyrus, Valentine, & DeFranco, 2013; CDC, 2013). Disparities thus exist in breastfeeding initiation and potential health outcomes to those populations most at risk for disease. Adolescent mothers are uneducated about the health benefits and protections of breast milk and this population is often overlooked in the promotion and protection of breastfeeding (Hunter, 2012; Moran, Dykes, Burt, & Shuck, 2006). This evidence-based practice (EBP) project aims to reduce the disparities of breast feeding initiation among a group of adolescent pregnant women in an inner city high school by increasing breast feeding self-efficacy and breast feeding intention. After an exhaustive search in the major databases including CINAHL, ProQuest, MEDLINE, and PsychInfo eleven articles were chosen for inclusion in the development of the EBP solution. Social Cognitive Theory is the framework that is utilized in the development of the EBP solution.  The EBP intervention includes psychological and environmental determinants of behavior, observational learning, self-regulation, and moral disengagement. The EBP implementation will include a series of three group learning activities utilizing an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) and two peer breast feeding counselors and will focus on increasing self-efficacy and intention through various educational techniques focusing on the benefits of breast feeding, common difficulties, and mechanisms to overcome barriers. The combined use of various techniques to engage adolescent learners in improving their self-efficacy will be utilized with a team approach, during the second trimester of pregnancy, over the course of three lunch-time educational sessions. Techniques include didactic, discussion, hands-on, demonstration, and literature. Support by a lactation expert will continue through to delivery within their school environment on a weekly basis. The Prenatal Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale will be utilized to measure pre and post-intervention. The Breast feeding Self Efficacy-Short Form (BFSE-SF)will be administered postpartum to determine postpartum self-efficacy as a mechanism to determine the impact of the intervention. Additionally, stated feeding intention will be collected pre and post intervention, as well as self-report data on initiation and continuation of any breast feeding during a telephone interview conducted between two to four weeks postpartum.en
dc.subjectbreastfeedingen
dc.subjectself-efficacyen
dc.subjectbreastfeeding initiationen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:32:14Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:32:14Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.