Making It Work: Information Technology and Mobile Devices in Nursing Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602655
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Making It Work: Information Technology and Mobile Devices in Nursing Education
Author(s):
Raman, Janet
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Omega
Author Details:
Janet Raman, NP-C, RN, CEN, CNE, raman@adelphi.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Information technology (IT) and mobile devices have become a part of most everyone’s daily lives both personally and professionally.  IT and mobile devices, such as cellular telephones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and tablets, permit quick and easy access to vast amounts of information. With this in mind, it is understandable that international nursing organizations, including the International Council of Nurses (ICN) and Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society of Nursing (STTI), and many national nurses associations (NNAs), have written Position Statements calling for the integration of information technology into nursing curriculums since as far back as 1997. Nursing programs have begun to follow the above-mentioned directives to incorporate information technology, and the use of mobile devices, in teaching nursing students how obtain and utilize up-to-date information necessary for patient care. This process has been found to enhance nursing student learning and facilitate the nursing students’ preparation for evidence-based practice in the current healthcare environment. However, many drawbacks to the use of mobile technology including the high price of the devices, and the necessary applications, as well as IT issues, have emerged.  Faculty resistance to learning and implementing mobile technology in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical environment has also been proven to be problematic. Further, many clinical facilities are not permitting nursing students to use  their cellphones, personal digital assistants, or tablets in their institutions due to Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) concerns and other issues. The challenge now is: how can nursing education make this work in classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings despite the obstacles? Some of the current strategies to improve the utility of mobile devices in nursing education will be shared and ideas which may further enhance the integration of mobile information technology into nursing education will be discussed. Suggestions for future research in this area will be presented as well.
Keywords:
Mobile Technology; Nursing Students; Nursing Education
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15SC2.77
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleMaking It Work: Information Technology and Mobile Devices in Nursing Educationen
dc.contributor.authorRaman, Janeten
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Omegaen
dc.author.detailsJanet Raman, NP-C, RN, CEN, CNE, raman@adelphi.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602655en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Information technology (IT) and mobile devices have become a part of most everyone’s daily lives both personally and professionally.  IT and mobile devices, such as cellular telephones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and tablets, permit quick and easy access to vast amounts of information. With this in mind, it is understandable that international nursing organizations, including the International Council of Nurses (ICN) and Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society of Nursing (STTI), and many national nurses associations (NNAs), have written Position Statements calling for the integration of information technology into nursing curriculums since as far back as 1997. Nursing programs have begun to follow the above-mentioned directives to incorporate information technology, and the use of mobile devices, in teaching nursing students how obtain and utilize up-to-date information necessary for patient care. This process has been found to enhance nursing student learning and facilitate the nursing students’ preparation for evidence-based practice in the current healthcare environment. However, many drawbacks to the use of mobile technology including the high price of the devices, and the necessary applications, as well as IT issues, have emerged.  Faculty resistance to learning and implementing mobile technology in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical environment has also been proven to be problematic. Further, many clinical facilities are not permitting nursing students to use  their cellphones, personal digital assistants, or tablets in their institutions due to Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) concerns and other issues. The challenge now is: how can nursing education make this work in classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings despite the obstacles? Some of the current strategies to improve the utility of mobile devices in nursing education will be shared and ideas which may further enhance the integration of mobile information technology into nursing education will be discussed. Suggestions for future research in this area will be presented as well.en
dc.subjectMobile Technologyen
dc.subjectNursing Studentsen
dc.subjectNursing Educationen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:33:51Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:33:51Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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