Being There: Undergraduate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Nursing Presence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602670
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Being There: Undergraduate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Nursing Presence
Author(s):
Van Denack, Jeanne; Kostovich, Carol Toliuszis
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Omicron
Author Details:
Jeanne Van Denack, RN, jvandenack@luc.edu; Carol Toliuszis Kostovich, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate nursing students’ perceptions of nursing presence during a medical-surgical clinical rotation. Significance/Rationale: Nursing presence is defined as the physical and emotional availability of the registered nurse to the patient. Technological advancements coupled with an emerging nursing workforce comprised of a technology-dependent millennial generation could potentially threaten the emotional connection between nurse and patient. Few studies have explored nursing presence from a student perspective. Methods and Analysis: The phenomenon of nursing presence was presented during an undergraduate junior level medical-surgical nursing theory course. Thirty-two students enrolled in this course participated in the study. On the last day of the semester, students responded in writing to 4 open-ended questions asking about their observations of nursing presence during their clinical rotation. Data were coded by two nurse researchers, first separately, then collaboratively. The 12 items from the Presence of Nursing Scale-RN “Being With” subscale, representing the emotional connection between nurse and patient, served as the codebook to guide the analysis. Results: Narrative comments by students represented all 12 items on the “Being With” subscale. Some elements of “being with” the patient were described frequently, while other elements were expressed less frequently. Conclusions: Junior-level undergraduate nursing students are able to recognize and recount their experiences of nursing presence during a medical-surgical clinical rotation. Implications: Teaching undergraduate nursing students to recognize nursing presence can serve as the foundation for teaching patient-centered nursing care delivery. Other methodologies for introducing this phenomenon to students, including simulation, should be explored.
Keywords:
undergraduate nursing; clinical course; nursing presence
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15SC2.95
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleBeing There: Undergraduate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Nursing Presenceen
dc.contributor.authorVan Denack, Jeanneen
dc.contributor.authorKostovich, Carol Toliuszisen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Omicronen
dc.author.detailsJeanne Van Denack, RN, jvandenack@luc.edu; Carol Toliuszis Kostovich, PhD, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602670en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate nursing students’ perceptions of nursing presence during a medical-surgical clinical rotation. Significance/Rationale: Nursing presence is defined as the physical and emotional availability of the registered nurse to the patient. Technological advancements coupled with an emerging nursing workforce comprised of a technology-dependent millennial generation could potentially threaten the emotional connection between nurse and patient. Few studies have explored nursing presence from a student perspective. Methods and Analysis: The phenomenon of nursing presence was presented during an undergraduate junior level medical-surgical nursing theory course. Thirty-two students enrolled in this course participated in the study. On the last day of the semester, students responded in writing to 4 open-ended questions asking about their observations of nursing presence during their clinical rotation. Data were coded by two nurse researchers, first separately, then collaboratively. The 12 items from the Presence of Nursing Scale-RN “Being With” subscale, representing the emotional connection between nurse and patient, served as the codebook to guide the analysis. Results: Narrative comments by students represented all 12 items on the “Being With” subscale. Some elements of “being with” the patient were described frequently, while other elements were expressed less frequently. Conclusions: Junior-level undergraduate nursing students are able to recognize and recount their experiences of nursing presence during a medical-surgical clinical rotation. Implications: Teaching undergraduate nursing students to recognize nursing presence can serve as the foundation for teaching patient-centered nursing care delivery. Other methodologies for introducing this phenomenon to students, including simulation, should be explored.en
dc.subjectundergraduate nursingen
dc.subjectclinical courseen
dc.subjectnursing presenceen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:34:11Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:34:11Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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