Dress for Success: Increasing Self-Efficacy Baccalaureate Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602718
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Dress for Success: Increasing Self-Efficacy Baccalaureate Nursing Students
Author(s):
Fortier, Mary Elizabeth
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Nu
Author Details:
Mary Elizabeth Fortier, RN, CNL, mfortier@njcu.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: My research focused on the impact, if any, on novice nursing students’ perception of their self-efficacy when the intervention of requiring professional attire is utilized in their first clinical course? Novice nursing students’ are faced with many challenges when beginning a baccalaureate program. The challenges include time management, academically thought-provoking coursework, and learning a new skill-set for patient assessment. The purpose of this exploratory interventional study was to measure novice baccalaureate nursing students’ self-efficacy perceptions in their first clinical experience. “Does self-efficacy increase if given professional attire therefore increasing the students’ perception of their roles as nursing students and in turn their self-efficacy?”  A sample size of 8 for the experimental group and n=8 for the control group is realistic for this proposed intervention; consequently a pilot study format was utilized. A quasi-experimental research design is anticipated.  Demographics were obtained at the beginning of the study.  The General Self-Efficacy Scale was administered to both the control group and the experiemental group at the beginning and the conclusion of the pilot study.   Data was evaluated using the SPSS statistical package. Self-Efficacy is defined as: a personal judgment or belief concerning one’s ability to successfully perform a particular task or behavior (Bandura, 1986).  It has been theorized that self-efficacy may influence the likelihood of success.  The significance of this interventional research study that evaluated the advantage of requiring novice nursing students to dress in professional attire and the effect this intervention had on their self-efficacy perception.  The investigator anticipated and found that when given professional attire, a lab coat, the novice nursing student demonstrated a significant improvement in their self-efficacy perception.  Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
Keywords:
Self-efficacy; Success; Professionalism
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15CL2.25
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleDress for Success: Increasing Self-Efficacy Baccalaureate Nursing Studentsen
dc.contributor.authorFortier, Mary Elizabethen
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Nuen
dc.author.detailsMary Elizabeth Fortier, RN, CNL, mfortier@njcu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602718en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015 and Tuesday, November 10, 2015: My research focused on the impact, if any, on novice nursing students’ perception of their self-efficacy when the intervention of requiring professional attire is utilized in their first clinical course? Novice nursing students’ are faced with many challenges when beginning a baccalaureate program. The challenges include time management, academically thought-provoking coursework, and learning a new skill-set for patient assessment. The purpose of this exploratory interventional study was to measure novice baccalaureate nursing students’ self-efficacy perceptions in their first clinical experience. “Does self-efficacy increase if given professional attire therefore increasing the students’ perception of their roles as nursing students and in turn their self-efficacy?”  A sample size of 8 for the experimental group and n=8 for the control group is realistic for this proposed intervention; consequently a pilot study format was utilized. A quasi-experimental research design is anticipated.  Demographics were obtained at the beginning of the study.  The General Self-Efficacy Scale was administered to both the control group and the experiemental group at the beginning and the conclusion of the pilot study.   Data was evaluated using the SPSS statistical package. Self-Efficacy is defined as: a personal judgment or belief concerning one’s ability to successfully perform a particular task or behavior (Bandura, 1986).  It has been theorized that self-efficacy may influence the likelihood of success.  The significance of this interventional research study that evaluated the advantage of requiring novice nursing students to dress in professional attire and the effect this intervention had on their self-efficacy perception.  The investigator anticipated and found that when given professional attire, a lab coat, the novice nursing student demonstrated a significant improvement in their self-efficacy perception.  Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.en
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen
dc.subjectSuccessen
dc.subjectProfessionalismen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:35:13Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:35:13Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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