2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602806
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Eliciting the Childs' Voice in Patient Experience
Author(s):
Waldron, Mia K.; Hinds, Pamela; Hinds, Pamela
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Mu
Author Details:
Mia K. Waldron, RN-BC, CPN, mwaldron@childrensnational.org; Pamela Hinds, PhD, RN, FAAN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and Sunday, November 8, 2015: Practice problem – Patient satisfaction surveys have become a widely accepted measure of the quality of health care and are an important nurse sensitive indicator. However, these surveys have been focused on adults or the parents of children who receive care. To provide the best care for each patient, using a patient-family- centered care approach; the child’s voice must be considered. Purpose– The project goal is to determine the feasibility of obtaining the child’s perspective, in regards to patient satisfaction with the nursing care received. Patient satisfaction was evaluated utilizing a 5-item electronic survey. The survey documented the perspectives of three age groups: 6-8 year olds, 9-12 year olds, and 13-17 year olds. The survey response options were illustrated on a separate sheet with three faces that ranged from smiling fully, to a neutral (straight line), to a frown. Corresponding word response formats (TRUE, SOMETIMES, and NOT TRUE) were printed below each face for all participants. Children approached, were inpatients for at least 24 hours, or outpatients, at the conclusion of their PACU s stay. Summary of literature – Every year approximately 3 million children are hospitalized in the United States according to the National Center for Health Statistics 1. The well and ill child’s voice in reporting on subjective symptom and quality of life experiences is now well established in the literature with emphasis on children ages 8 years and older with selective examples of younger children, including 5 to 7 year olds 2-6.  The concept of children having a voice in their own health care has also gained credibility with children being included on inpatient rounds and in end-of-life decision making 7-9. Outcomes – The primary aim of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of querying children about their satisfaction with nursing care experiences here at a free standing Children’s Health system in Mid- Atlantic The children and families were all receptive to participation in this survey; we had no refusals from families or children. The anticipated time for completion of the introduction, instructions, and implementation of the survey was 15 minutes; however in practice the time spent was less than 10 minutes for each encounter, inclusive of instructions and reading questions aloud in certain cases. A total of 36 children were interviewed from the three clinical areas representing all age ranges. Outcomes for this project were overwhelmingly positive and demonstrated both the feasibility and lack of burden for this type of patient satisfaction survey. Conclusion and implications – Implications for pediatric nursing as a result of this project are the opportunity for patient experience recovery on occasions there are issues  with nursing prior to their discharge. Incorporation of the voice of children in planning care and decision- making is an important enhancement to nursing practice by eliciting the care experience feedback from the perspective of the child patient at the point of care in addition to only the parent. The further implications of this work will be the groundwork for establishing a link between patient experience perceptions of both parents and children, and post-hospital outcomes.
Keywords:
Nurse Sensitive Indicators; Child Voice; Patient Satisfaction
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15EB1.8
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleEliciting the Childs' Voice in Patient Experienceen
dc.contributor.authorWaldron, Mia K.en
dc.contributor.authorHinds, Pamelaen
dc.contributor.authorHinds, Pamelaen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Muen
dc.author.detailsMia K. Waldron, RN-BC, CPN, mwaldron@childrensnational.org; Pamela Hinds, PhD, RN, FAANen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602806en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and Sunday, November 8, 2015: Practice problem – Patient satisfaction surveys have become a widely accepted measure of the quality of health care and are an important nurse sensitive indicator. However, these surveys have been focused on adults or the parents of children who receive care. To provide the best care for each patient, using a patient-family- centered care approach; the child’s voice must be considered. Purpose– The project goal is to determine the feasibility of obtaining the child’s perspective, in regards to patient satisfaction with the nursing care received. Patient satisfaction was evaluated utilizing a 5-item electronic survey. The survey documented the perspectives of three age groups: 6-8 year olds, 9-12 year olds, and 13-17 year olds. The survey response options were illustrated on a separate sheet with three faces that ranged from smiling fully, to a neutral (straight line), to a frown. Corresponding word response formats (TRUE, SOMETIMES, and NOT TRUE) were printed below each face for all participants. Children approached, were inpatients for at least 24 hours, or outpatients, at the conclusion of their PACU s stay. Summary of literature – Every year approximately 3 million children are hospitalized in the United States according to the National Center for Health Statistics 1. The well and ill child’s voice in reporting on subjective symptom and quality of life experiences is now well established in the literature with emphasis on children ages 8 years and older with selective examples of younger children, including 5 to 7 year olds 2-6.  The concept of children having a voice in their own health care has also gained credibility with children being included on inpatient rounds and in end-of-life decision making 7-9. Outcomes – The primary aim of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of querying children about their satisfaction with nursing care experiences here at a free standing Children’s Health system in Mid- Atlantic The children and families were all receptive to participation in this survey; we had no refusals from families or children. The anticipated time for completion of the introduction, instructions, and implementation of the survey was 15 minutes; however in practice the time spent was less than 10 minutes for each encounter, inclusive of instructions and reading questions aloud in certain cases. A total of 36 children were interviewed from the three clinical areas representing all age ranges. Outcomes for this project were overwhelmingly positive and demonstrated both the feasibility and lack of burden for this type of patient satisfaction survey. Conclusion and implications – Implications for pediatric nursing as a result of this project are the opportunity for patient experience recovery on occasions there are issues  with nursing prior to their discharge. Incorporation of the voice of children in planning care and decision- making is an important enhancement to nursing practice by eliciting the care experience feedback from the perspective of the child patient at the point of care in addition to only the parent. The further implications of this work will be the groundwork for establishing a link between patient experience perceptions of both parents and children, and post-hospital outcomes.en
dc.subjectNurse Sensitive Indicatorsen
dc.subjectChild Voiceen
dc.subjectPatient Satisfactionen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:37:08Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:37:08Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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