2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602841
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Animal Assisted Therapy Effects on Quality of Life
Author(s):
Carroll, Jessica C.; Amack, Emily M.; Curry, Madeline P.; Cessarich, Amber M.; Beaver, Jenny D.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jessica C. Carroll, BLS, PEARS, jessicaccarroll42@gmail.com; Emily M. Amack, BLS, PEARS; Madeline P. Curry, BLS, PEARS, CNA; Amber M. Cessarich, BLS, PEARS; Jenny D. Beaver, PCT, BLS, PEARS
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and Sunday, November 8, 2015: Purpose: To see if animal assisted therapy improves quality of life in adult patients. PICO Question: In adult patients, will animal assisted therapy increase quality of life? Components/Processes: We searched CINHAL and PubMed using the terms "animal therapy,"� "inpatient,"� "quality of life,"� "pet therapy,"� "mood,"� "anxiety,"� "depression,"� "QOL,"� "animal assisted therapy,"� "loneliness,"� "dog therapy,"� "cat therapy."�� We selected five articles: two were experimental, two were quasi-experimental, and one was qualitative. Discussion of Results: Most of the studies supported animal-assisted therapy as a useful intervention for increasing quality of life in adults. One study (Johnson, Meadows, Haubner, & Sevedge, 2008) did not find significance, because it concentrated on the comparison between the effects of animal-assisted therapy versus other standard therapies. So, they concluded as well as another study (Nepps, Stewart, & Bruckno, 2011) that animal-assisted therapy was as effective as other therapies, but was not significantly more effective. Therefore, the answer to our PICO question was that animal-assisted therapy is beneficial, but the usefulness in comparison to other therapies should be researched further. Conclusions/Implications: All studies recognize the usefulness and potential benefits of animal-assisted therapy as adjunct therapy. Further research is needed to determine its effectiveness as a primary intervention, but all studies in this synthesis agree that it has benefits. Further research should include larger sample sizes, longer duration, follow-up quality of life measurements, and concentration on specific target populations.
Keywords:
animal assisted therapy; quality of life; adult population
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15RS1.19
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleAnimal Assisted Therapy Effects on Quality of Lifeen
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Jessica C.en
dc.contributor.authorAmack, Emily M.en
dc.contributor.authorCurry, Madeline P.en
dc.contributor.authorCessarich, Amber M.en
dc.contributor.authorBeaver, Jenny D.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsJessica C. Carroll, BLS, PEARS, jessicaccarroll42@gmail.com; Emily M. Amack, BLS, PEARS; Madeline P. Curry, BLS, PEARS, CNA; Amber M. Cessarich, BLS, PEARS; Jenny D. Beaver, PCT, BLS, PEARSen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602841en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and Sunday, November 8, 2015: Purpose: To see if animal assisted therapy improves quality of life in adult patients. PICO Question: In adult patients, will animal assisted therapy increase quality of life? Components/Processes: We searched CINHAL and PubMed using the terms "animal therapy,"� "inpatient,"� "quality of life,"� "pet therapy,"� "mood,"� "anxiety,"� "depression,"� "QOL,"� "animal assisted therapy,"� "loneliness,"� "dog therapy,"� "cat therapy."�� We selected five articles: two were experimental, two were quasi-experimental, and one was qualitative. Discussion of Results: Most of the studies supported animal-assisted therapy as a useful intervention for increasing quality of life in adults. One study (Johnson, Meadows, Haubner, & Sevedge, 2008) did not find significance, because it concentrated on the comparison between the effects of animal-assisted therapy versus other standard therapies. So, they concluded as well as another study (Nepps, Stewart, & Bruckno, 2011) that animal-assisted therapy was as effective as other therapies, but was not significantly more effective. Therefore, the answer to our PICO question was that animal-assisted therapy is beneficial, but the usefulness in comparison to other therapies should be researched further. Conclusions/Implications: All studies recognize the usefulness and potential benefits of animal-assisted therapy as adjunct therapy. Further research is needed to determine its effectiveness as a primary intervention, but all studies in this synthesis agree that it has benefits. Further research should include larger sample sizes, longer duration, follow-up quality of life measurements, and concentration on specific target populations.en
dc.subjectanimal assisted therapyen
dc.subjectquality of lifeen
dc.subjectadult populationen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:37:52Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:37:52Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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