2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602841
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Animal Assisted Therapy Effects on Quality of Life
Author(s):
Carroll, Jessica C.; Amack, Emily M.; Curry, Madeline P.; Cessarich, Amber M.; Beaver, Jenny D.; Amack, Emily M.; Curry, Madeline P.; Cessarich, Amber M.; Beaver, Jenny D.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jessica C. Carroll, BLS, PEARS, jessicaccarroll42@gmail.com; Emily M. Amack, BLS, PEARS; Madeline P. Curry, BLS, PEARS, CNA; Amber M. Cessarich, BLS, PEARS; Jenny D. Beaver, PCT, BLS, PEARS
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and Sunday, November 8, 2015: Purpose: To see if animal assisted therapy improves quality of life in adult patients. PICO Question: In adult patients, will animal assisted therapy increase quality of life? Components/Processes: We searched CINHAL and PubMed using the terms “animal therapy,” “inpatient,” “quality of life,” “pet therapy,” “mood,” “anxiety,” “depression,” “QOL,” “animal assisted therapy,” “loneliness,” “dog therapy,” “cat therapy.”  We selected five articles: two were experimental, two were quasi-experimental, and one was qualitative. Discussion of Results: Most of the studies supported animal-assisted therapy as a useful intervention for increasing quality of life in adults.  One study (Johnson, Meadows, Haubner, & Sevedge, 2008) did not find significance, because it concentrated on the comparison between the effects of animal-assisted therapy versus other standard therapies.  So, they concluded as well as another study (Nepps, Stewart, & Bruckno, 2011) that animal-assisted therapy was as effective as other therapies, but was not significantly more effective. Therefore, the answer to our PICO question was that animal-assisted therapy is beneficial, but the usefulness in comparison to other therapies should be researched further. Conclusions/Implications: All studies recognize the usefulness and potential benefits of animal-assisted therapy as adjunct therapy.  Further research is needed to determine its effectiveness as a primary intervention, but all studies in this synthesis agree that it has benefits.  Further research should include larger sample sizes, longer duration, follow-up quality of life measurements, and concentration on specific target populations.
Keywords:
animal assisted therapy; quality of life; adult population
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15RS1.19
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleAnimal Assisted Therapy Effects on Quality of Lifeen
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Jessica C.en
dc.contributor.authorAmack, Emily M.en
dc.contributor.authorCurry, Madeline P.en
dc.contributor.authorCessarich, Amber M.en
dc.contributor.authorBeaver, Jenny D.en
dc.contributor.authorAmack, Emily M.en
dc.contributor.authorCurry, Madeline P.en
dc.contributor.authorCessarich, Amber M.en
dc.contributor.authorBeaver, Jenny D.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsJessica C. Carroll, BLS, PEARS, jessicaccarroll42@gmail.com; Emily M. Amack, BLS, PEARS; Madeline P. Curry, BLS, PEARS, CNA; Amber M. Cessarich, BLS, PEARS; Jenny D. Beaver, PCT, BLS, PEARSen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602841en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and Sunday, November 8, 2015: Purpose: To see if animal assisted therapy improves quality of life in adult patients. PICO Question: In adult patients, will animal assisted therapy increase quality of life? Components/Processes: We searched CINHAL and PubMed using the terms “animal therapy,” “inpatient,” “quality of life,” “pet therapy,” “mood,” “anxiety,” “depression,” “QOL,” “animal assisted therapy,” “loneliness,” “dog therapy,” “cat therapy.”  We selected five articles: two were experimental, two were quasi-experimental, and one was qualitative. Discussion of Results: Most of the studies supported animal-assisted therapy as a useful intervention for increasing quality of life in adults.  One study (Johnson, Meadows, Haubner, & Sevedge, 2008) did not find significance, because it concentrated on the comparison between the effects of animal-assisted therapy versus other standard therapies.  So, they concluded as well as another study (Nepps, Stewart, & Bruckno, 2011) that animal-assisted therapy was as effective as other therapies, but was not significantly more effective. Therefore, the answer to our PICO question was that animal-assisted therapy is beneficial, but the usefulness in comparison to other therapies should be researched further. Conclusions/Implications: All studies recognize the usefulness and potential benefits of animal-assisted therapy as adjunct therapy.  Further research is needed to determine its effectiveness as a primary intervention, but all studies in this synthesis agree that it has benefits.  Further research should include larger sample sizes, longer duration, follow-up quality of life measurements, and concentration on specific target populations.en
dc.subjectanimal assisted therapyen
dc.subjectquality of lifeen
dc.subjectadult populationen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:37:52Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:37:52Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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